Apr 16

Mets Game Thread: Looking Flat So Far

The Mets appear a little flat tonight, and that probably has a lot to do in that they’re not doing anything against the Marlins’ Jarred Cosart. Dillon Gee left one over the plate to Giancarlo Stanton and he crushed it.

He does that to a lot of people.

The Mets are going after their fifth straight win, something they haven’t done in almost two seasons.

By the way, Gee just retired the Marlins in the fifth inning, something he has done in a major-league high 48 straight starts.

Miami 3, Mets 0 (5th)

Apr 16

April 16, Mets Batting Order Vs. Marlins

The Mets will be going after their fifth straight victory tonight against the Miami Marlins. Not once last season did the Mets win five in a row, and only three times did they win as many as four straight games. Their last five-game winning streak was May 26-30, 2013.

The Mets were 11-8 against the Marlins last season, including 6-3 at Citi Field.

Here is the Mets’ batting order tonight:

Curtis Granderson, RF

Travis d’Arnaud, C

Lucas Duda, 1B

Michael Cuddyer, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Eric Campbell, 3B

Juan Lagares, CF

Wilmer Flores, SS

Dillon Gee, RHP

Gee is coming off a 5-3 loss in last Saturday’s 5-3 loss at Atlanta. He has worked at least five innings in his last six starts against Miami, going 3-1 with a 2.84 ERA.

ON DECK: Why I like Dillon Gee.

Apr 16

Mets-Marlins Rotation

The following are the starting pitchers for the Mets-Miami series, starting tonight at Cit Field:

Tonight: RHP Dillon Gee (0-1, 9.00) vs. RHP Jarred Cosart (0-1, 1.50), 7:10 p.m. ET

Friday: RHP Bartolo Colon (2-0, 2.77) vs. RHP David Phelps (0-0, 36.00), 7:10 p.m. ET

Saturday: RHP Jacob deGrom (1-1, 1.46) vs. RHP Mat Latos (0-2, 17.36), 7:10 p.m. ET

Sunday: RHP Matt Harvey (2-0, 2.25) vs. RHP Tom Koehler (1-1, 3.18), 1:10 p.m. ET

 

 

Apr 08

DeGrom A Most Intriguing Met

Of all the Mets’ young pitchers, I am most intrigued with Jacob deGrom, last year’s NL Rookie of the Year and Wednesday’s starter at Washington. Quiet and unassuming, unlike Matt Harvey, deGrom came out of the bullpen last season following an injury to Dillon Gee and never left the rotation.

Hopefully, he’ll stay in it for years.

Why deGrom over the others?

DeGROM: Captures the imagination.  (Getty)

DeGROM: Captures the imagination. (Getty)

Well, Harvey is Harvey, and despite his hype, all too often he leaves the impression he’s more interested in becoming a New York media darling instead of a Mets’ star. There’s a big difference.  Also, I can’t shake the feeling he’s just passing through Queens until he relocates to the Bronx.

Fair? Maybe not, but that’s the perception.

I get the feeling if deGrom stays healthy he’ll have a longer career with the Mets than Harvey.

The same applies with Zack Wheeler, but for a different reason.

Wheeler’s elbow injury went from bad to worse, and it won’t be until late in the 2017 season until we might really know something about him. By then, it is hoped he would have developed command to go with his natural stuff. So far, that lack of command lead to high pitch counts that stressed his arm.

But, for right now the main intrigue is his health.

As for Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz, yeah, there’s interest. However, the intrigue meeter won’t click on until Sandy Alderson forgets this Super Two nonsense and brings them up here. Until then, they are wishful thinking.

But deGrom?

Well, he’s here and now. He seems real; he’s not a diva. We saw what he did last year coming out of nowhere, and it whet our appetite for more. He went 9-6 despite an offense that provided little support and a shaky bullpen. What was eye-popping was a 2.69 ERA and 144 strikeouts in 140.1 innings. That’s dominating stuff. And it continued in spring training as he showed no signs of letting up with a 2.08 ERA, .167 opponent batting average and 0.73 WHIP in 26 innings.

What I also like is he’s not a know-it-all. He exudes confidence without being abrasive, and also a willingness to learn evidenced by working hard on his breaking pitches during spring training. He also took copious mental notes watching Bartolo Colon on Opening Day.

“I watched what Bartolo did,” deGrom told reporters in Washington. “He just located and kept the ball down and threw the ball really well. That’s always my game plan, to throw strikes and keep it down.”

As with Harvey, the Mets will carefully monitor deGrom’s innings early in the season.

“I’ll just go out there and go as long as they’ll let me go,” he said.

And, that might be good enough.

ON DECK:  More on the lineup.

Mar 30

Good Games From Montero And Duda Raise Questions

Two pertinent Mets’ issues surfaced in today’s 7-1 rout of the Marlins. The most urgent is the competition for a starter’s spot between Rafael Montero and Dillon Gee. The second is the idea of giving Lucas Duda a contract extension.

DUDA: Are Mets talking long-term? (AP)

DUDA: Are Mets talking long-term? (AP)

Coming on the heels of Gee’s strong outing Sunday, Montero was equally dominating today against Miami with six scoreless innings. He gave up two hits and no walks with six strikeouts.

The assumption is Gee would get the starter job, which is what Terry Collins said after Zack Wheeler’s season-ending elbow injury. However, the Mets have dragged their feet on making an official announcement, and now there are reports they are trying again to deal Gee.

Considering the fragility of starting pitching, and clear questions surrounding their bullpen – of which Montero would be more effective – the prudent decision would be to commit to Gee in the rotation.

As for the 29-year-old Duda, there are reports of a four-year, $31-million contract. Duda is coming off a 30-homer, 92-RBI season and will make $4.2 million this year. He went deep today and drove in five runs, so you might think Duda’s agents at the Beverly Hills Sports Council will be putting in a call to GM Sandy Alderson soon.

Reportedly, Duda’s people are interested in talking this week, but don’t want to negotiate during the season. The Mets don’t operate well when under the gun like that, which is probably a good thing.

Normally, I’d be in for signing Duda long term, but you must remember he’s only had one good season. I’m not sure one good year is worth a four-year deal.

If he does it again, then sure, but the price will go up.

ON DECK: Mets Matters: Today’s notebook.