Mar 24

Giving up on Beltran being ready

The more I think about it, the less I see the purpose of Carlos Beltran being ready by Opening Day.

BELTRAN: Why push it?

Today and tomorrow he’ll be in simulation games. Maybe another DH stint in a minor league game this weekend. That would leave less than a week’s worth of minor league games to get ready, and who knows how many would be in right field?

The Mets need Beltran healthy for the purpose of dealing him at the trade deadline because he won’t be re-signed, and realistically, will they really be a contender this year?

The plan they devised for Beltran yesterday makes sense to the degree that he won’t lose extra games on the DL because they would back date it only the last 10 days of spring training, but in actuality he won’t be ready regardless. Plus, with the wet turf and cold weather in early April, the odds are really good of him being re-injured.

The Mets are in position of trying to salvage what they can out of Beltran. He’s barely been healthy the past two years and won’t get much better in the next week.

Mar 23

Plan for Beltran; Emaus inside track at second.

Although not definitive, the Mets’ roster is taking shape as spring training approaches.

The Mets remain insistent Carlos Beltran will be ready for Opening Day and are pushing him, although they aren’t likely to play him in a major league game in case things unravel and he’ll be forced to open on the disabled list.

EMAUS: Second base frontrunner.

Beltran was hitless in five at-bats today as a DH in a minor league game. He will play as a DH tomorrow and Friday, but possibly this weekend he could play in the field and run the bases.

Possibly.

“I do think it is fair to say at this point there’s not a lot of wiggle room in that schedule between now and Opening Day if he’s going to be on the active roster,’’ GM Sandy Alderson said. “As of this point he’s still on track for Opening Day.’’

DL assignments are backdated 10 days into spring training, so if things stand as they are and Beltran were to only play in minor league games he would only miss the first three games of the season (the Mets have two off days among the first five games).

Assuming this plan works out, Willie Harris and Scott Hairston, the outfield depth, will right field. Should Beltran land on the DL, Lucas Duda will be the 25th man on the roster.

Today, Alderson told reporters to take a look at today’s lineup card and use their imagination. Standing out was Brad Emaus at second base and Daniel Murphy at third.

Emaus, a Rule 5 pick-up from Toronto, has a greater upside than Luis Hernandez, who is out of options and is being shopped because he probably won’t clear waivers. The Mets have a good idea of what to expect from Hernandez, but Emaus has potential working for him.

“I like my chances, but we’re not all the way there,’’ Emaus told reporters this afternoon about his chances.

Murphy started at third today and has been getting time and first and second. He’s the projected left-handed bat off the bench.

Justin Turner, as expected because of his options, was sent down.

Meanwhile, Oliver Perez signed a minor league deal today with the Nationals.

Mar 08

Beltran sidelined again.

BELTRAN: Not running any time soon.

The Mets say they aren’t worried, which considering the past two seasons is far from believable. Carlos Beltran will will be out at least was week with left knee tentinitis, presumably caused by compenstation for the pain in his chronic right knee.

Let’s see. He’ll be down a week. Then need at least four or five days to get ready to try it again, which puts us after March 20. Anybody else out there thinking he might start the season on the disabled list?

Beltran said this morning, “I’m going to continue to work and try to put myself in shape, but the field things, it’s going to be off [for] a little bit.”

The Mets have even eschewed minor league games where he could DH, but not run. Beltran said he’s been feeling discomfort since the start of spring training, which precipitated his move to right field.

There’s nothing you can do with injuries but look at them at the worst case scenario. There’s no indication Beltran will be a viable player anytime soon, and of course, this minimizes his trade value to next to nothing. The worse possible thing to happen to the Mets would be for Beltran to be sidelined and unable to play or be traded.

I hope I am wrong, but the odds aren’t looking very promising.

 

Feb 28

Beltran move to right official; best interest of all

BELTRAN: Makes move to right

In the end, Carlos Beltran acted with his head over his heart.

While still believing he could play center field, the 33-year-old Beltran doesn’t think he could play to the level he had grown accustomed to immediately and told manager Terry Collins this morning that it was in the best interest of everybody that he move to right field now and let Angel Pagan play center.

Beltran said he wanted to make the switch now because of his knees, although Collins was prepared to give the veteran until the middle of the month to see if he can still play center.

“I have to think about my health and how to be in the field for the team,’’ Beltran told reporters this morning in Port St. Lucie. “ I believe the best decision is for me to play right field. It’s going to be less active, and I am looking forward to saving my knees for the long run.

“I know if I am healthy and I can play more time in the field, I can help this team offensively, even in the outfield. I know it will be a different transition for me to make but I feel I will be able to go to that.’’

Continue reading

Dec 03

Letting Carter go explains a lot.

The decision to let Chris Carter go explains a lot about both the past and present regimes of the Mets.

Just to save a few dollars, the Mets traded Billy Wagner to Boston for Carter late in the 2009 season. The option would have been to pay out the balance of the contract, offer him arbitration and collect the compensatory draft choices when he declined.

Those draft picks would look good now for a team with a myriad of holes.

Then GM Omar Minaya didn’t want to take that gamble because of the fear Wagner might accept and saddle the Mets with a bad contract, albeit for one season. That fear was instilled in large part from pressure from the Wilpons to save money.

What Minaya didn’t realize, and therefore couldn’t relay to the Wilpons, was Wagner understood the Mets were a sinking ship and wouldn’t have wanted to come back anyway. In hindsight, the prudent decision would have been to pay out Wagner for 2009 and gamble on arbitration.

Tbat brings us to Sandy Alderson and the decision to cut ties with Carter.

There’s still pressure to save money where ever possible as the 2011 contract for Carter would be at least $200,000 (60 percent of last year’s contract) plus the minor league contract. Alderson can bring Carter back at a reduced rate in a new split contract.

The pressure is on Carter to accept because with Fernando Martinez (assuming he’s healthy) and Lucas Duda, the Mets already have left-handed bats off the bench.

Carter was productive as a pinch-hitter, but he’s strictly a one-dimensional player in that his defense and throwing are weak.

Alderson knows Carter doesn’t bring much to the table, at least not more than Martinez or Duda, so why pay the extra money that’s needed for a franchise that wants to pinch pennies?