Jan 06

Mets Will Likely Pick Up Salary To Deal Bruce Or Granderson

The Baltimore Orioles have a deep bullpen and are in need of a DH and/or a corner outfielder. Meanwhile, the Mets need relievers and it is no secret they are trying to trade Jay Bruce and/or Curtis Granderson.

So, why can’t these teams get together on a trade? They seem like logical trade partners.

Sure, it would be great to snag Zach Britton, but that’s a fantasy, and it would take a lot more than Bruce or Granderson. In the Orioles’ six-man bullpen, Odrisamer Despaigne, Vance Worley and Ubaldo Jimenez are the last three on the depth cart, so we can probably start from there.

Reportedly, the Orioles would like to trim from their 2016 payroll of $147 million, so it’s not difficult to conclude if a deal is worked out the Mets would have to pick up some of Bruce’s ($13.1 million) or Granderson’s ($15 million) salary.

Jan 03

My Hall Of Fame Ballot

The New York Times recently published a story claiming baseball writers softened their stance against voting for players connected with PEDs. Well, they didn’t contact me about my ballot that does not include Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa or Ivan Rodriguez, all of whom have been connected to steroids.

MUSSINA: Got my vote.(Getty)

MUSSINA: Got my vote.(Getty)

I always considered it a privilege to be a Hall of Fame voter; one I take very seriously. I always believed taking steroids was cheating.

The fundamental misconception of steroids is it enables a hitter to crush a ball 500 feet or adding a couple of feet to a fastball. That’s not it. Steroids enable a player continuing to work out when exhausted. The issue isn’t added strength but increased bat speed that generates to power. For pitchers, it heightens stamina allowing him to work longer into games.

And, for all users, there’s an increase in the confidence of better production.

There have been some reporters whose litmus test to detect cheaters was the back-acne test. Every voter has their own criteria, and I have three: 1) the player had to have failed a drug test and subsequently failed in the appeal process; 2) he had to have been mentioned in the Mitchell Report or any other MLB sanctioned investigation or report; and 3) he had to have been outed, on the record, by a player, coach or baseball official.

If the Hall of Fame changes its protocols and puts on the plaque a player used PEDs – after an admission by the athlete – then I will reconsider and vote for a user.

The following were on my ballot:

Mike Mussina:  Won 20 games for the only time in his 18-year career in his final season. Of course, he could have hung on to win 300. Won at least 15 games in 11 seasons. Won 270 games, falling 30 short of what traditionally has been automatic entry. His .638 winning percentage is sixth best among those who won 250 games. Received Cy Young Award votes nine times.

Jeff Bagwell: There have been rumors, but nothing substantiated. He garnered 71.6 percent of the vote last year – missing out by 15 votes – and every player who received at least 65 percent of the vote got in. Bagwell hit over 30 homers in nine of his 15-year career with Houston. He averaged over 100 runs scored and 100 RBI per season during his career.

Tim Raines: Is on the ballot for the final time before going to the veteran’s committee. He’s arguably one of history’s greatest leadoff hitters, joining Pete Rose, Lou Brock and Rickey Henderson. He was a lifetime .294 hitter with a .385 on-base percentage and stole 808 bases in 954 attempts (the best percentage in history at 84.7 percent).

Trevor Hoffman: A seven-time All-Star finished with 601 saves in his 18-year career. His career hits-per-innings ratio of 6.9 leads all relievers. Recorded at least 30 saves in 14 of 15 seasons and had over 40 nine times.

Lee Smith:  What is wrong with being a compiler? You have to pretty good to hang around for 18 seasons and have 13 straight years of 20-plus saves, 10 of 30-plus saves and three of 40 or more. He ranks 12th all-time in games pitched with 1,022. He ranks third all-time with 478 saves.

Edgar Martinez: Designated hitter is an official position, so why should he be penalized for playing the majority of his games there? MLB named its award for best DH in his honor. Martinez hit at least .300 in ten seasons and is one of nine players to hit 300 homers, 500 doubles, a career average over .300, a career on-base percentage over .400 and a slugging percentage over .500.

Fred McGriff: This one I call a testament for hitting clean. It used to be 500 homers was automatic entry into the Hall of Fame; McGriff hit 493 in 19 seasons. He hit over 30 homers ten times and drove in at least 100 runs eight times. No whispers about him doing it the right way.

Dec 05

Mets Vs. Nats At Winter Meetings

The Winter Meetings officially start today at the Gaylord National Harbor convention center in suburban Washington and the host Nationals are already trying to make a splash while our Mets are barely sticking their toes in the water.

imagesThe hot rumor has the Nationals in the market for both Andrew McCutchen and Chris Sale. They are also in it for reliever Mark Melancon. Rumors always swirl this time of year, but that one is a beauty.

That would obviously put Washington over the top in the NL East.

Meanwhile, the Mets’ order of business is to attempt to trade Jay Bruce or Curtis Granderson – and there are reports GM Sandy Alderson might listen to offers for Michael Conforto – and possibly convert Zack Wheeler to the bullpen.

The Wheeler item is interesting and I’ll have more on that later.

I’m not saying the Nationals will get both McCutcheon and Sale, or either of them, but clearly the Mets and Nationals aren’t shopping in the same aisle. They aren’t even shopping in the same store.

I’ll have updates on these and other items throughout the day.

For those of you who regard the Yankees as the Mets’ fiercest competition, they already made themselves better by acquiring Matt Holliday from St. Louis to fill their DH hole. It weakens the Cardinals, so that’s a good thing.

Photo credit: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Nov 21

Dodgers Could Be Major Players For Cespedes

Regardless of how fast the Mets and Yoenis Cespedes wants this process to go, nothing will be resolved until the Los Angeles Dodgers are heard from. If the Dodgers are able to deal Yasiel Puig – reportedly linked to the While Sox in a proposed trade involving Chris Sale – they will put on a full-court press for Cespedes.

CESPEDES: Where is he running to? (AP)

CESPEDES: Where is he running to? (AP)

It could come down to the Mets vs. Dodgers for Cespedes, and if that’s the case, Los Angeles has deeper pockets and a greater willingness to spend than the Wilpons.

They aren’t without their holes with the prospect of losing closer Kenley Jansen and third baseman Justin Turner – although they will talk to both about coming back – but they have a clear need for a right-handed bat.

Who knows about the Yankees, whether they are just posturing with their interest or are sincere in bringing Cespedes to the Bronx? It could be either, but I wouldn’t be surprised if they really wanted him. Cespedes, of course, is made to be a DH.

The Dodgers are more likely to acquiesce to Cespedes’ reported salary demands of up to $129 million over five years. Meanwhile, the Mets are in at four years and up to $100 million. Remember none of these numbers have been confirmed by the prospective teams or Cespedes’ agent.

The Mets, fearing a physical breakdown, don’t want to give the fifth year. Actually, I don’t think they want to go four, but three would force Cespedes to hop on the next flight to LA.

If Cespedes really loves New York and the Mets, he’ll sign for far less. However, if it is all about the money, he’ll go West.

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Nov 05

Cespedes To Opt Out Today

By midnight today, Yoenis Cespedes will tell the Mets he is opting out of his contract to pursue the riches of free agency.

The Mets have expected him to leave since they gave him the opt-out clause after one season of a three-year, $75-million contract. In reality, they never him to come back after he was close to signing a five-year, $110-million deal with Washington.

CESPEDES: Where is he running to? (AP)

    CESPEDES: Where is he running to? (AP)

Somehow, Cespedes eschewed that contract for the Mets. Perhaps he was overwhelmed by the World Series experience.

I’ve written several times how the Mets would be better off letting Cespedes go and spend the money elsewhere. I know that it is an unpopular position because we’re supposed to be enamored with Cespedes’ power, but frankly, he’s too high-maintenance for the money.

I’m annoyed he hustles when the mood strikes; that he played golf when he should have been rehabbing his quad; and he couldn’t play centerfield, which pretty much ended Michael Conforto’s play in left field.

If he comes back and has to play left, it stunts Conforto’s development. I certainly don’t want the Mets to fool around with Conforto at first base just to placate Cespedes.

The Mets will make a qualifying offer, which Cespedes will reject to accept a $100-million package with somebody else.

There are a handful of teams Cespedes where could land, but remember the Nationals were the only team to make an offer last year.

The Nationals could go after Cespedes again, which would entail Bryce Harper moving to center and Jayson Werth going to right. An outfield of Cespedes, Harper and Werth could be imposing.

San Francisco, which needs offense and with left fielder Angel Pagan to become a free agent, could be a player. Another possibility is Toronto, which might lose Jose Bautista, Edwin Encarnacion and Michael Saunders, will certainly have the money.

Another option could be the Yankees. They have long-term outfield commitments to Jacoby Ellsbury and Bret Gardner, but with Mark Teixeira and Alex Rodriguez gone, they have a designated-hitter opening.

Conventional wisdom has Cespedes seeking a five-year contract, but last year’s leg problems must concern the Mets, and a DH position has to be appealing to him.