Jun 30

Hot Mets still need David Wright.

I am not saying this hasn’t been fun to watch, but Justin Verlander will start this afternoon for the Detroit Tigers against the Mets.

WRIGHT: Still need his stroke.

The Mets have won four straight games – scoring a franchise record 52 runs in the process – and six of their last seven to climb to two games over .500.

All teams go through stretches like this where they seemingly score at will. They’ve been scarce for the Mets, who should be enjoying it while they can.

However, this is not to say the Mets have turned some kind of offensive turner and evolve into another Lumber Company or Big Red Machine. Amazingly, some suggest David Wright’s return might gum up the works.

Hardly.

Wright started swinging the bat yesterday in a pool and could hit off a tee today. If all goes well he could play rehab games in a week and possibly return after the All-Star break.

Yes, the Mets are hot now and playing with a degree of chemistry, but they are only two games over .500 and five games behind in the wild card. After Detroit, they have the Yankees for three games and a long West Coast trip to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

There’s a lot of season left, but an even smaller window where the Mets must prove they are players and worthy of not having the plug pulled from their season. A lot rides over the next 31 days, and it would be foolish to suggest the Mets would be better off without Wright in that span.

May 18

Who’s on first?

OK, for all of you who dissed me this winter about Adam Dunn, how would you like to have him now that Carlos Delgado is on the DL for who only knows how long? Word is Delgado could be out for a lot longer than two weeks, which only exposes what we already knew – the Mets had no contingency plans for first base.

It’s a reflection on the minor league system that there’s not a ready replacement for Delgado.

Unless the Mets know for sure Delgado will be out for an extended period, it makes no sense to unload the remaining blue chips on the minor league level for a first baseman. Besides, despite their recent run, the Mets’ rotation is due to expose itself as it did earlier this season and they’ll most likely be looking at acquiring pitching at the trade deadline. That’s where the chips should be spent.

Currently, the Mets are mixing according to the pitching match-ups between Jeremy Reed and Fernando Tatis. Neither are good enough to play fulltime, although Tatis has been playing well.

Moving Daniel Murphy to first – which also keeps Gary Sheffield’s bat in the line-up – has been discussed. But, should the Mets bite the bullet and stick in him there, or send him down to the minor leagues for a month at the position?

Delgado’s injury leaves a gaping hole in the middle of the batting order the Mets are trying to fill with the 40-year Sheffield, a player the Detroit Tigers were willing to pay millions of dollars to for just going away. Sheffield has been hot lately, but do you want to bet for how long it will last? If Delgado is gone for any length of time, David Wright will eventually assume the clean-up position in the order.

Oct 22

James: Mets’ core pretty good.

James: Likes Wright and Reyes.

James: Likes Wright and Reyes.

The young core some people would like to break up ranks high with analyst Bill James, who ranks David Wright fourth and Jose Reyes ninth in his list of the top major leaguers under 30 years old in his book, “Young Talent Inventory.”

Overall, the Mets are ranked 16th in terms of young talent, which is in the middle of the pack and nothing to get excited about.

Here’s James’ top 25:

?1. Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers first baseman, age 24
?2. Hanley Ramirez, Florida Marlins shortstop, age 24
?3. Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants pitcher, age 24
?4. David Wright, New York Mets third baseman, age 25
?5. Ryan Braun, Milwaukee Brewers left fielder, age 24
?6. Dustin Pedroia, Boston Red Sox second baseman, age 24
?7. Matt Kemp, Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder, age 23
?8. Francisco Rodriguez, Los Angeles Angels pitcher, age 26
?9. Jose Reyes, New York Mets shortstop, age 25
10. Nick Markakis, Baltimore Orioles right fielder, age 24
11. Joakim Soria, Kansas City Royals pitcher, age 24
12. Ryan Zimmerman, Washington Nationals third baseman, age 23
13. Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, age 24
14. Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado Rockies shortstop, age 23
15. Felix Hernandez, Seattle Mariners pitcher, age 22
16. Jon Lester, Boston Red Sox pitcher, age 24
17. Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay Rays third baseman, age 22
18. John Danks, Chicago White Sox pitcher, age 23
19. Adrian Gonzalez, San Diego Padres first baseman, age 26
20. James Loney, Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman, age 24
21. Stephen Drew, Arizona Diamondbacks shortstop, age 25
22. Brian McCann, Atlanta Braves catcher, age 24
23. Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers first baseman, age 25
24. Grady Sizemore, Cleveland Indians center fielder, age 25
25. Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds first baseman, age 24

Three other Mets’ prospects, reliever Eddie Kunz, catcher Josh Thole and outfielder Daniel Murphy were selected to play in AFL All-Star Game Friday night.