Dec 14

Cano: Good Player, But He Is Still What’s Wrong With Sports

Robinson Cano’s orchestrated dinner with the New York Mets was clearly transparent, made even more so after his introductory press conference in Seattle. It was only an indicator of things to come from this childish man.

Bottom line: Cano wanted to stay in New York, but at his price, and in the end his price is all that mattered to him. It is impossible to do business when you give nothing back in the negotiations. If you don’t give back they cease being negotiations.

CANO: Good riddance.

CANO: Good riddance.

Cano is a marvelously talented baseball player, but a flawed individual. He might be a five-tool player, but on the human level, none of his tools include discretion, loyalty, common sense or rational thinking. We do know Cano has streaks of arrogance, delusional thinking and greed in his persona. He also has an annoying sense of entitlement.

“I didn’t feel respect. I didn’t get respect from them and I didn’t see any effort,’’ Cano said with a straight face when asked about the Yankees.

Being offered $175 million over seven years was plenty of respect countered Yankees president Randy Levine. Look, Levine and the Yankees don’t need anybody to fight their battles, but Cano was shown respect and his hissy fit needs to be addressed, because if nothing else it is a display of all that is wrong with today’s professional athlete.

From the outset, $300 million over ten years, was over the top, but it never hurts to ask because somebody might bite. However, when it became apparent Cano didn’t want to budge, you knew he wouldn’t stay in New York and the Yankees would be better off without him.

With Derek Jeter at the end of this career, and Alex Rodriguez in PED limbo, Jacoby Ellsbury will not be the difference. They need pitching and to shed some of its unproductive payroll – Mark Teixeira for one – and start rebuilding. The money earmarked Cano will be better invested elsewhere.

It was a business decision for Cano to state his negotiating objectives of money and years. It is also a business decision for the Yankees to say they no longer want to give ten-year contracts to players over 30 years old. Cano wants us to respect his business decision, yet he can’t respect the Yankees’ right to do the same. Just delusional and out of touch with reality is Cano.

I don’t begrudge Cano the right to have money as his motivation, but distasteful is his attitude. The only party showing a lack of respect in this issue is Cano, towards the Yankees, to the fans, and to his profession.

You made a choice, now live with it and don’t bash the Yankees on the way out. They didn’t criticize your choice; don’t criticize theirs.

Perhaps the greatest complaints people have about athletes is their disconnect from reality, their disregard about others, and when they don’t hustle. Cano violates our sensibilities by doing all three.

I believe a player is worth what his employer is willing to pay him. In that vein, Cano is worth $240 million to the Mariners. He’s just not worth $240 million to the Yankees, which is their right to determine.

Nobody has the right to say $240 million is too much, because who among you would turn it down?

But, we have the right to be irritated at Cano’s lack of touch with reality, which is insulting to those struggling to make ends meet or have been out of work.

“I was looking for a contract where I would just be able play and focus on the game and wouldn’t wonder when I’m 37, 38 would I have a job one day,’’ was what he tried to pass off as logic for his decision.

Seriously?

If at the end of the $175 million he would have gotten from the Yankees, if healthy and had he not worn out his welcome, he would have had another deal. Please don’t tell us after $175 million you’d be that insecure as to worry about your future. It is insulting to all those who buy tickets to watch you play or purchase your jersey.

Also insulting is your agent, Jay Z, who operating on your behalf, after accepting $240 million from Seattle went back to the Yankees with the request of $235 million over ten years.

It says you really don’t want to be in Seattle. How should they feel about that?

The Yankees are better off without him, which is something Seattle will find out eventually. At 3,000 miles away, it isn’t far away far enough.

In New York, there are too many apologists for your style and attitude. They say you’re entitled to take plays off, to jog down to first base because you’re usually in the line-up and you’re a good player. But, you don’t have that right. Cano has been given a gift of talent, but when you half-ass it to first base, you insult the fan and your profession. Not hustling is never justified.

They let you get away with it, and in the end it had to figure in the Yankees’ thinking. Deep down, they don’t want a dog to be the face of their franchise. You got a pass on that in New York, but they know how to boo in Seattle, and you’ll hear them soon enough.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Nov 11

Yankees’ Curtis Granderson Spurs Offer; Mets Could Have Interest

Not surprisingly, many of the significant players of interest to the New York Mets who declined the qualifying offers from their respective teams. With the starting point at $14.1 million, the Mets know their beginning parameters.

One player is Curtis Granderson, who, because of several hand injuries, was limited to seven homers, 15 RBI and a .229 average and a .317 on-base percentage. During his 10-year career, Granderson has averaged 30 homers, 83 RBI, a .340 on-base percentage and a .828 OPS, numbers that would fill the Mets’ need for a power-hitting corner outfielder.

GRANDERSON: Could the Mets snare him?

GRANDERSON: Could the Mets snare him?

That includes two 40-homer seasons over the past three years, but a qualifier must be the cozy dimensions of Yankee Stadium and hitting in a line-up with Alex Rodriguez and Mark Teixeira. He won’t have nearly that kind of protection in the line-up.

Another red flag must be his hand injuries and if they snapped his wrist strength needed to turn on a pitch.

Granderson said in a radio interview last week he could accept a one-year deal and try again next winter. However, that doesn’t mean it would be for $14.1 million.

The Mets could have serious competition for Granderson from the Yankees, who need to upgrade their offense in anticipation of not knowing if they’ll have Rodriguez, questions about Teixeira’s health and wondering what they’ll get from Derek Jeter.

The Mets are reluctant to offer more than three years, but should they go four years – which appers the magic number for many players – Granderson would be 36 at the end of the deal which might have him still in his prime. Plus, Granderson has a track record of greater production than Chin-Soo Choo.

The dollars might not be a detriment to signing Granderson, but the red flags are his health and the wonder of what he could produce in a new league and at Citi Field. Another is if Granderson is only a left-handed hitting Jason Bay.

All legitimate concerns.

Nov 09

Yankees’ Brendan Ryan Could Be Stop Gap Answer At Shortstop

The New York Mets are in the market for a shortstop, but there are red flags with the biggest names on the market.

Stephen Drew, 31, was given the $14.1-million qualifying offer by the Red Sox, which might be too pricey for the Mets’ blood. Reportedly, Drew wants a multi-year deal, but the Mets are reluctant to get bogged down on a long-term deal, considering what they’ve gone through over the past few years.

The Mets will also get competition from the Yankees, who like Drew’s left-handed bat in that bandbox of a stadium. The Yankees also need a shortstop because of the uncertainty surrounding Derek Jeter. There’s also the possibility of Jeter moving to third base if Alex Rodriguez is suspended.

Rafael Furcal, 36, is coming off an injury and a two-year, $14-million contract with the Cardinals.

There’s also 32-year-old Jhonny Peralta, who is coming off a three-year, $16.75 million contract with Detroit. Peralta has an offensive upside, but as with outfielder Nelson Cruz from Texas, there’s the specter of using performance-enhancing drugs. How much of their production is from them or the chemicals? It’s a legitimate concern.

Finally, there’s the Yankees’ Brendan Ryan, who made $3.25 million last year. Ryan would likely come at a reasonable salary and might not ask for the length of contract demanded by Drew or Peralta.

The Mets don’t know if they’ll have Ruben Tejada, who is recovering from a broken leg, and even when he was healthy last season he didn’t produce at the plate or in the field.

 

Sep 28

Mets’ David Wright On Iconic Path

The New York Mets have had one iconic player in their history, that being Hall of Famer Tom Seaver.

Should he remain healthy and play out his contract at his current pace, they will have another in David Wright.

WRIGHT: On iconic path,

WRIGHT: On iconic path,

When Wright signed his mega-contract he did it with the idea of retiring a Met, just as Mariano Rivera is doing with the Yankees, and Derek Jeter will follow.

“I want to retire with the Mets,’’ Wright said. “That’s very important to me.’’

Wright isn’t boastful, but definitely proud of the way he’s perceived not only by his teammates and management, but the fans.

That is why, with nothing to play for, Wright worked hard to come back from his hamstring and hopes to be in the lineup tonight despite having a jammed thumb.

Wright, who has a Rivera jersey hanging in his locker, did not play Friday after being hit in the head the previous night and jammed his thumb as he fell.

With the baseball eyes of New York fixated on Rivera’s retirement and whether Robinson Cano will bolt the Yankees for the last dollar, Wright carries on almost unnoticed.

With the exception being his clubhouse, where Collins is most appreciative.

“I think when David Wright’s days are done here, he’ll be thought of in that light,’’ Collins said. “He’ll hold every record there is in this organization. He’ll have every offensive record there is.

“And I know one of the things you’ve heard and mentioned so many times [during the Yankee Stadium ceremony] was Mariano Rivera off the field, how he is in the clubhouse, how he is in real life. This guy is the same way.’’

You have two more days to enjoy Wright until next spring.

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Sep 22

Mets Wrap: Whether They Finish Third Or Fourth, Mets Have Plenty Of Questions

In the grand scheme, we won’t know for years to what degree finishing third or fourth will impact the New York Mets in regards to their draft position and subsequent pick. Will finishing third give them a lesser pick and deprive them of selecting the next Derek Jeter?

Nobody can project with any accuracy baseball draft picks. Even No. 1s have been busts. And, David Wright is right in his line of reasoning it really doesn’t matter where you finish if there are no playoffs?

COLLINS: One of many questions. (AP)

COLLINS: One of many questions. (AP)

However, considering the expectations, the abundance of injuries, and dreadful second-half offense which led from a slide of seven games under .500 to their current position of 13 under, finishing strong the last week, and in third, couldn’t hurt in laying the groundwork for next year.

However, whether it is third or fourth, it will not reduce the number of issues for the 2014 Mets. Sweeping the Phillies this weekend might give them a feel-good confidence heading into the offseason, but does not eliminate their immediate off-season issues:

1) How long will they string Terry Collins along, or will they do the right thing and make an announcement the day after the season finale, or that Sunday?

2) The Mets have been saying for years this is the offseason they will spend, if so, how much?

Will Matt Harvey opt for surgery or go into the season riding a gamble?

Regardless of Harvey’s decision, will the Mets add a veteran starter, because as of now they have just three plus Aaron Harang?

Is there something to worry about after Zack Wheeler was shut down for the year after tightness in his shoulder following Saturday’s start?

GM Sandy Alderson has been trying to build a bullpen for three years. Will this be a fourth?

Will they cut ties with Ike Davis or extend this torturous experiment into next spring?

Should they pass on tendering Davis a contract for 2014, how confident are they in Lucas Duda or do they need to add a first baseman?

Are they confident of Bobby Parnell’s recovery from surgery, or will they feel the need to add a closer?

Will they decide to see what they have in Ruben Tejada in spring training or add a shortstop?

Is their outfield plan to platoon Matt den Dekker and Juan Lagares in center field or have them both play in the outfield?

What is their satisfaction level with Eric Young, knowing if they replace him it will be in left field and as a leadoff hitter?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos