Mar 06

Mets’ Ike Davis, Lucas Duda Still Hurting

Recovery for New York Mets first basemen Ike Davis and Lucas Duda from leg injuries remain slow, with neither expected to play soon.

DAVIS: Still ailing. (AP)

DAVIS: Still ailing. (AP)

Davis hit against live pitching in an intrasquad game today, but did no running. He is dealing with tightness in both calves and said the prognosis of playing tomorrow is premature.

“The good thing is it doesn’t hurt to swing, so I can get at-bats and stuff like that,’’ Davis told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “I’ve just got to wait a little bit longer for running, so the point in my calves to the touch don’t hurt anymore.

“It’s both calves. My left one is better than my right. My right one is a little bit worse. But it’s getting better every day. Today it felt better than it did yesterday. `So hopefully in the next couple of days I’ll be able to start running. I’m trying to get as many at-bats so I don’t miss that part of it – like today. And then obviously as soon as I’m able to play, I’ll be playing a bunch.’’

Davis, who hit .205 with only nine homers last season, believes the injuries originated while lifting weights.

Davis believes it his better to miss time now than aggravate the injury further and miss more time.

As for Duda, also solid from the weight room, said he has soreness in the bottom of his left hamstring.

Duda said he’s feeling better every day, but isn’t ready to test it in a game.

ON DECK: Mets wrap

Mar 06

Mets-Astros Rained Out; Rotation Altered

Today’s rainout forced the New York Mets to alter their pitching rotation.

Fifth-starter candidate John Lannan was scheduled to start against Houston in Kissimmee, Fla. Instead, he will start Friday against St. Louis at Port St. Lucie.

Daisuke Matsuzaka will also pitch against the Cardinals. Rafael Montero and Steven Matz, also scheduled to pitch today, will go tomorrow.

ON DECK: Setbacks for Ike Davis and Lucas Duda

 

Feb 28

Updating Mets’ Injuries: Niese, Parnell, Young And Colon

It’s early, but the New York Mets already have several injury issues that don’t include Jonathon Niese.

PARNELL: To throw BP Saturday (AP)

PARNELL: To throw BP Saturday (AP)

There were reports Niese might throw this weekend, but that’s premature as he said he doesn’t know when he’ll get back on the mound. That could be determined later today.

Obviously, his exhibition start Tuesday against Houston is pushed back. Niese said he doesn’t expect to miss his Opening Day start, March 31, against Washington at Citi Field.

In addition:

* Closer Bobby Parnell is scheduled to throw batting practice Saturday. It will be his first time throwing to hitters since undergoing surgery to repair a herniated disk in his neck. Parnell was supposed to throw earlier in the week, but that was pushed back after sustaining a strained left quadriceps muscle.

Parnell’s status is considered one of the Mets’ most significant issues in spring training. If he isn’t ready to start the season, Vic Black will assume the closer role.

* Outfielder and leadoff hitter Eric Young isn’t expected to play this weekend because of a strained muscle in his side. Manager Terry Collins said the training staff wants to see Young in the field before letting him play. Collins said Sunday at the earliest, but indicated Monday or Tuesday are more likely.

* Bartolo Colon has been out with a strained calf, but is expected to throw today. He has been working out on a stationary bike.

ON DECK: Is Sandy Alderson kidding about 90 wins?

 

Feb 27

Syndergaard Stars In Intrasquad Game; Mets Shouldn’t Get Carried Away

The cheers were great, the performance was scintillating, but the New York Mets – and their often-frustrated fan base – shouldn’t get carried away and read too much into Noah Syndergaard’s performance in Thursday’s intrasquad game.

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

In Syndergaard’s first performance in the Mets’ camp, Syndergaard, throwing what manager Terry Collins calls “the hook from hell,’’ struck out five in two innings. He also gave up a run on four hits, but with no walks.

Not only was Syndergaard’s curveball working in fall-off-the-table fashion, but his 97 mph., fastball was sizzling.

“I felt pretty good out there. I kind of shocked myself a little bit,’’ Syndergaard told reporters Thursday in Port St. Lucie. “I wasn’t expecting that my first time out there.’’

Nor should the Mets expect that from him in Monday’s start against Atlanta; every time out at Triple-A Las Vegas; or when he finally is brought up in June. He’ll need time to develop into all what is expected of him.

“I didn’t think I was going to get the start, first of all,” Syndergaard said of Monday. “I’m excited, a little nervous at the same time. It’s the first time facing a real big-league lineup. I’m going to go out there and do what I can. It’s still a game. They’re still playing baseball out there.’’

Which is true, but baseball is also a game of emotions. Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler, despite their youth, have been able to keep their emotions in check. The Mets would like to see the same from Syndergaard.

That will be easier, of course, if he’s throwing that fastball in the upper 90s.

“How can you not like what you saw?’’ Collins said. “For heaven’s sake, I don’t know how hard he threw, but it was firm. Even in a game like this, you better get to the heater, because you don’t want to try to hit that curveball.

“Certainly everything you heard, you saw. You heard, ‘What a great arm.’ You got it. You heard, ‘He’s got a great presence,’ that he pounds the strike zone. He did that.’’

Of course, should Syndergaard cut down the Braves as he did his minor league teammates, there will be rumblings about cracking the rotation.

However, Collins and general manager Sandy Alderson should a turn a deaf ear and continue with the same plan they had last season for Wheeler.

ON DECK: Mets Wrap.

Feb 27

Jon Niese MRI Is Clean; Incident A Reminder Of Pitching Fragility

The New York Mets received good news Thursday when the MRI on Jon Niese’s pitching shoulder came back clean. Most times when a pitcher complains of a dead arm as Niese did, the issue is more weakness than injury, which is the diagnosis here.

This was the best possible news for the Mets, who have plenty of issues already without having to worry about losing their No. 1 starter.

This was a scare to be sure, but what it also serves as is a reminder starting pitching is scarce, meaning they better be careful if they are considering dealing a starter, even on the minor level, for shortstop Nick Franklin.

Reportedly, Seattle is asking for starting pitching for Franklin, an infielder who became expendable with the Mariners’ signing of Robinson Cano. The Mets turned down trade overtures for Niese in the past, but this time he wasn’t on the Mariners’ wish list.

Niese was examined Wednesday at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan after complaining of shoulder soreness the day after throwing batting practice. He wanted the exam for his peace of mind because he missed two months last season with a partially torn rotator cuff.

Niese will miss his first exhibition start, Tuesday against Houston, but could resume throwing this weekend.

Manager Terry Collins said Niese will be the Mets’ Opening Day starter, and didn’t back off that Wednesday.

ON DECK: Intrasquad game.