Dec 09

Alderson Says Davis Trade Not Imminent

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. - While the New York Mets would like to deal Ike Davis or Lucas Duda by the end of the week, general manager Sandy Alderson gave no indication today a move was imminent.

DAVIS: Not close to a deal.

DAVIS: Not close to a deal.

Teams are waiting out the Mets in the hope either might be released or that they’d be desperate and drop the price. Alderson said prospective buyers are exploring other options, whether it is in the trade or free-agent markets. Some teams could be offering the Mets little in return, while others want to explore the free-agent market first.

There are a lot of reasons why a trade doesn’t get done.

“That’s always the case,’’ Alderson said. “There’s always going to be an alternative. That’s what provides the tension of negotiating a deal. [Teams] are always looking at what their alternatives are. That’s what provides the tension of getting something done and not getting something done; simply there are other options.’’

Currently, James Loney and Corey Hart are in the free-agent market, while Miami is trying to deal Logan Morrison and Texas is attempting to trade Mitch Moreland.

Of course, it could take one phone call to change everything. A team could offer the Mets a sweet deal, or Alderson can cave just to make a trade.

The latter is highly unlikely.

“Could we do something?’’ Alderson asked. “Yeah, we have that ability. Whether we do it or not is a function of what we can get and what our other options are.’’

Working against the Mets in trying to trade Davis is that other teams are aware of his shortcomings and of the Mets’ overt desire to swing a deal. The Mets have not been subtle in this, and given the high probability Davis won’t be with the team next spring have teams being reluctant.

They aren’t waiting in line to talk trade about Duda, either.

“Everybody is aware of what we have. We don’t have to advertise that,’’ Alderson said. “As far as marketing, [other teams] do their own evaluations. If somebody is not inclined to make a deal for a particular player, it is difficult to talk them into it and get something in return.’’

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Dec 03

Why Mets Did Not Non-Tender Ike Davis

If the New York Mets don’t want Ike Davis, why didn’t they just non-tender him? That way the unproductive first baseman with the looping swing and high propensity for striking out would be gone. Davis would just them be another failure in Mets lore.

DAVIS: Mets playing waiting game, (Getty)

DAVIS: Mets playing waiting game, (Getty)

That’s the conventional wisdom, but there’s more to it under the surface. There always is.

As long as Davis remains on the Mets’ 40-man roster, he’s an asset capable of either producing on the field when the season starts, or as a trade piece.

Obviously, the Mets would like to find a trading partner, but might find they won’t be getting much in return. With a flood of free agents on the market, most teams would rather attempt that route first because all they would spend is money.

The smarter teams are waiting for the Mets to dump him during spring training, that way they could get Davis without having to surrender talent in return. Subsequently, the Mets are holding on to Davis to see if there’s a team that loses a first baseman to injury during spring training and finds itself in a bind.

If there’s no such opportunity, there’s always waiting for the July 31 trade deadline. That’s the Mets’ best hope of getting quality in return.

In addition, if the Mets take Davis to spring training, he might win the job if Lucas Duda doesn’t perform. There’s no given with Duda, so that has to be in the back of Sandy Alderson’s mind.

 

Nov 21

Ike Davis Doesn’t Want To Leave Mets; There Are Reasons Why He Shouldn’t

Supposedly, the New York Mets have a half-dozen potential trading partners for flawed first baseman Ike Davis.

However, based on service time, Davis has no ability to void a trade. Even so, that doesn’t mean he’s open to the idea of leaving.

DAVIS: Wants to stay.

DAVIS: Wants to stay.

Davis told the Mets’ website on MLB.com he doesn’t want to leave Citi Field for Milwaukee, Tampa Bay or the launching pad in Baltimore.

“I just want a chance to play,’’ said Davis, who hit .205 with nine homers and 33 RBI in a frustrating season punctuated by a lengthy stay in the minor leagues. “Honestly, I’ve loved my time with the Mets. I’m still a Met right now and I don’t want to get traded. But that part of the game is not up to us. You want to stay, but you don’t have any say in it.’’

There are several compelling reasons why the Mets could re-consider their stance to shop their once-future centerpiece slugger:

* He has shown an ability to hit with power evidenced by 32 homers in 2012, a season that featured a lengthy first-half slump.

* There might not be a good enough offer for him, or some other team might snag Lucas Duda in a trade first, leaving first base open.

* Duda might not prove to be the answer, either.

The arbitration process, considering Davis’ season, might be kind to the Mets (he made $3.1 million last year).

* At 26, Davis is a year younger.

* It has always been something with Davis, either a slump or injury, so he hasn’t had an uninterrupted season with the Mets. Giving Davis another year could give him time enough to figure it out for 2015, the year they pencil in to be competitive with the return of Matt Harvey.

If it happens, Davis said he would suck it up and accept what the baseball gods give him.

“That’s life, man,’’ Davis said. “You can’t just sit there and cry. You’ve just got to move on. Like this year: I’m not going to sit here and pout because I’ve been bad. No, I’m going to work my butt off and see if I can be better next year. That’s the only way to live life.’’

Both Duda and Davis have a high propensity for striking out, but the Mets might prefer the former because of a slightly better on-base percentage last season (.352-.326).

 

Dec 07

Mets Need Breakout Years From Davis, Duda, Niese And Others

DAVIS: Mets need breakout year from him. (Getty)

Let’s assume for a moment – and this isn’t much of a reach – the Mets don’t do anything for the remainder of the winter. How then, can the Mets be competitive if another assumption that R.A. Dickey won’t be back?

A lot of things must happen, beginning with David Wright regaining his power stroke. If he does, and Johan Santana has a good year, that’s only the beginning. So much else has to happen in terms of their young players having breakout seasons. It could happen. It has before.

JOSH THOLE: I won’t be going out on a limb if I said Thole would again be the starting catcher. As much as there’s talk of the Mets needing a catcher, they have more pressing needs, such as the bullpen and outfield. Those areas must be addressed first. Thole made a good first impression hitting .321 in 2009 with his bat control, ability to work a count and go to the opposite field. Maybe he was corrupted by watching others with no plate presence, but his average has declined every year since and he provides no power. Even worse, has been his defense. If the Mets are to open their wallets after 2013 – that’s what they tell us so it must be true – they will address catching so this is Thole’s last chance.

IKE DAVIS: Davis was a beast in the second half and finished with 32 homers. He must learn to put two halves together, and it begins by being more selective at the plate. His power production could soar if he cuts his strikeouts and increases his walks. Davis can be dangerous, but has too many holes in his swing and goes into long stretches where he tries to pull everything. Since the Mets are void of power, any trade talk involving Davis is ridiculous.

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