Nov 03

2012 Mets Player Review: Ike Davis


PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: After sitting out most of 2011 with what can best be described as a bizarre ankle injury, Ike Davis reported to spring training optimistic, only to be slowed by a virus that sapped his energy and strength. The Mets had always loved Davis’ power potential when he slugged 19 in his first season and finished seventh in the Rookie of the Year voting. He got off to a fast start last season and was on a 30-homer pace when he had seven by the time he was injured in an infield collision with David Wright in Colorado. When Davis first came up, he quickly impressed with his patience and ability to go to the opposite field. But, by the end of that season they were semi-concerned about his strikeouts (138) but more enamored with his potential.

2012 SEASON REVIEW: The 2008 first-round pick was anxious to put his injuries behind him, but got off to a miserable start, going hitless in his first five games and finishing April batting .185 with three homers and seven RBI. Davis was chasing everything out of the strikezone and barely sniffed a walk. The more he struggled the more he tried to pull and pitchers toyed with him. Davis didn’t reach .200 until June 27, and didn’t stay over it for good until July 4. Davis began to find his power groove after the All-Star break, ironically, at a time when the overall Mets’ offense went into a tailspin. Davis finished the season hitting .227 with a .308 on-base percentage and .771 OPS, 32 homers and 90 RBI. One has to wonder had he hit just .250 what that might translate into additional run production. Strikeouts were again a problem with 141 and only 61 walks.

LOOKING AT 2013: Last season ended with Davis the topic of trade rumors, particularly to Boston. The  Mets deny it, but Davis, 25, made only $506,690 last season. He’s affordable, young and still loaded with potential, making him one of the few marketable Mets. However, those reasons make him exactly the type of player the Mets should build around, so I don’t see him going anywhere, especially with Lucas Duda – his potential replacement at first – so unproven. There remain a lot of holes in Davis’ offensive game. He’s largely undisciplined and should add at least 50 points to his on-base percentage. By being more selective, he would invariably add to his power numbers. With Davis and Wright hitting back-to-back, the Mets have decent power in the middle of their line-up.

NEXT: Daniel Murphy

Oct 25

Reyes Campaigns For Wright

Maybe it is revisionist history on Jose Reyes’ part, but last night at the Nets-Knicks game he said he always wanted to stay with the Mets. I remember him saying that initially, but as the season progressed he rarely expressed that sentiment. Maybe he knew he was gone.

I don’t know and I don’t care anymore about Reyes. He received a $106-million, six-year contract from the Marlins. Good for him. He’ll be run down by the end and everybody knows it. Maybe he does, too.

Any way, Reyes is on-board with David Wright coming to play with him in Miami, calling it an honor, but added he should stay in Queens. Not that he should have, but Wright.

“They should sign David (long term),” Reyes told ESPN. “He’s been the face of the franchise for a long time. `If they let him go, that’s gonna be difficult to see the New York Mets without David Wright. I can’t imagine that. You never know in this game what’s gonna happen, but I wish all the best to David. He’s a good friend of mine.”

Mets GM Sandy Alderson said extending Wright’s contract is a priority, and sooner rather than later. The Mets have a $16 million option on Wright for 2013. He’ll be back next year, but it will be harder to extend him when he’s on the open market as he said he doesn’t want to negotiate during the season. Reportedly, the Mets already have a $100-million offer on the table.

Reyes said the same thing and held to it, and the Mets never made him an offer. The perception was the team was just waiting for him to go as they had no intention of matching the Marlins in money or years.

Reyes expressed no regrets in leaving the Mets, and the franchise, despite taking considerable heat from the public early on, has no regrets, either. The Mets were pleased with what Ruben Tejada gave them offensively and defensively, and considering Reyes’ health issues and their financial concerns, they didn’t want to be saddled down with a contract for a player they projected would break down.

Reyes stayed healthy, but underperformed this year considering the contract. It was a disastrous year for the Marlins, who just fired manager Ozzie Guillen. We knew Guillen’s future in Miami was in doubt when he opened up politically and was suspended. Despite the boasting Reyes and Hanley Ramirez would get along, apparently Miami never consulted Ramirez about moving to third and their supposed friendship became strained.

Miami is a mess, even worse than the Mets and will even listen to offers for stud pitcher Josh Johnson.


Oct 16

2012 Mets Player Review: R.A. Dickey, RHP


PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: R.A. Dickey had been a journeyman with a trick pitch his entire career, winning a career-high 11 games in 2010. Realistically, they had no right to expect more than that from him at age 37 and figured to be third or fourth in the rotation at best. Only injuries or poor performance from others could elevate his status, and was why he was in the Mets’ rotation in the first place. However, he pitched well in stretches the last two years and was a workhorse in 2011 with 208.2 innings. If he could log a comparable number in 2012, the pitching depleted Mets would be happy. Dickey had a solid ERA in 2010 and 2011 with hitters batting .251 and .256, respectively, against him. Since joining the Mets, for the most part Dickey pitched with composure and minimized damage. The Mets hoped he’d be a positive influence.

2012 SEASON REVIEW: Not only was Dickey a positive influence on the younger pitchers, he was arguably the team’s most important player. At 20-6 with a 2.73 ERA, he was 14 games above .500. Overall, the Mets finished 14 games below, so I’ll leave it to your imagination as to where the team would have been without him. Dickey threw 233.2 innings in 33 starts – he made one relief appearance – and limited hitters to an anemic .226 average, a career best by 30 points. Hitters had a .278 on-base and .640 OPS against him and he registered a 1.05 WHIP, easily his career best. Dickey’s All-Star season – it’s a shame Tony La Russa didn’t see fit to start him – included five complete games and three shutouts with back-to-back one-hitters. Clearly, in a game dominated by hard throwers, splitters and cutters, Dickey prevailed with the toughest pitch of all to control, walking only 54. He did this playing for a team in a free-fall for the second half and deserves the Cy Young Award.

LOOKING AT 2013: For all his numbers, it was only his third since 2001 with a winning record, which could make the Mets wondering if it was all done with smoke and mirrors. Dickey is on the books for $5 million next year, but it isn’t a given he’ll return, and if he does, stay for long. Dickey said his re-signing with the Mets is largely contingent on whether they also bring back David Wright. The two, on and off the field, represent the Mets and they would be taking a dramatic public relations hit if they traded or let them walk after 2013. An argument can be made if the Mets don’t see themselves as contenders next summer they could continue their rebuilding by dealing them for prospects. Any such deal, however, would be contingent on the other team being allowed to negotiate with them before making a trade. It would also be an admission they are a long way from being competitive.

TOMORROW: Jon Niese.

Oct 04

Has Wright Played His Last Game With The Mets?

Until something gets done, the David Wright situation will to be the central theme on Mets blogs everywhere for this entire offseason. I wanted to get things started by asking our staff the following most important question for the Mets moving forward.

Have we seen David Wright’s final game in a Mets uniform? 

Mitch: No. The reason why the Mets won’t be spending much in free agency is so they can bring both David and Dickey back. If a deal isn’t done this winter, it will be a major distraction in 2013, as everyone speculates about what the plans will be. I do believe David will be back, but that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t be surprised if he were traded mid-season in ’13. In fact, if a deal isn’t done his winter, I think there is a very good chance he gets traded.

Nick: No, no matter how people feel about the Wilpons and their lack of money and/or intelligence they understand David Wright is the New York Mets. He resembles to the fans everything Mets and is the face of the franchise and needs to be until he retires and into the foreseeable future.

Michael: No. I think Sandy has realized that this team can’t function without Wright or make any money, seeing as he is the only player the fans really pay to see play every day.

Gregg: I believe David Wright will be a Met for his entire career (of course I thought the Mets would have signed Jose Reyes). I think David wants to sign with Mets, it’s up to the Mets to make a credible offer. I also think if the Mets fail to re-sign Wright, 2014 will resemble 1977 at Citi Field.

Jim: Absolutely not. The guys wants to be here (surprisingly) and wants to be a part of the team that finally brings a championship back to Queens, whether that be next year, five years from now or 10-plus years from now. He’s now also the all-time leader in hits for the franchise. Ownership will somehow work out a deal for him for something like five years, $100 million. With Bay and Santana coming of the books in 2014, this will hopefully be a manageable contract.

Clare: After listening to David, it sure sounds like he wants to be a Met for his whole career. The Mets need to find a way to sign Wright long term. He is the face of our franchise and the fans are already dismayed with ownership. If Wright is allowed to walk like Reyes did, everyone better watch out! The fan reaction would be explosive to say the least

Jessep: No, because I do hope that the major financial issues of this franchise are behind them. Look, the bottom line is – if Wright is not retained past 2013, it tells you just how bad things really are. If he is signed, it gives hope that 2010 and 2011 are things of the past and yes there were some casualties from a terrible situation, but they are moving on.

Elliot: No, I’ve always felt that Wright, the Mets and New York had a different relationship than Reyes, the Mets and New York. The Mets know they need him for multiple reasons, and they’ll retain him beyond 2013. This could also be optimism blocking my sense of reason.

Fonzie13: No! David Wright will be extended over the winter. The Wilpons can’t afford the PR hit. Even they realize how important he is to the fanbase.

Satish: I think after the hit record, it would be an embarrassment to the franchise not to keep him. I think he will be around.

Rob Tie Dyed: This is a sad thought but a very real possibility. Sadly, I fear it will be. As David is in the midst of his most productive years, he needs to cash in. And to get to a team that actually wants to win, not just acts like it. Thanks for everything, David… See you in 20 years at Oldtimers Day. And go get that World Series ring. Ain’t happenin’ here any time soon.

XtreemIcon: No. His option will be picked up and the Mets will try to re-sign all the way up until he signs with another team. Coming to terms on money is an entirely different question.

Have the events and comments by Sandy Alderson in the last 24 hours given you more hope that a deal with David Wright will get done? Or did it only add to the uncertainty of the situation? Tell us your thoughts.

Fun with screenshots…

(Click to Embiggen)

(Click to Embiggen)

Sorry… Couldn’t resist… :-D

Sep 28

Dickey Relates To Fans The Way Few Have

It is in part because of his tell-all book that revealed both his flaws and his character. It is in part because of the road he has traveled – full of potholes – to get to 20 wins. It is in part because of his exuberance. It is in part because of his honesty.

Maybe, above hall it was the way he hustled down the line after hitting that dribbler down the line – against his manager’s orders. That’s the competitor in R.A. Dickey and why he’s related this year to Mets fans the way few have.

As he came to the plate that final time, the crowd responded by chanting his name. Dickey heard it and it moved him.

“I would hear this kind of growing surge,” he said. “And it was really neat. I don’t know if I’ve ever experienced that before, and maybe I never will again.”

Neat? Who but a kid at heart would say that? That relates to us on so many levels, greatest of all is the thrill of playing the game we’ve all played in our youth and dreamed of playing at the highest level and hearing in our imagination the chants Dickey heard.

It was why he swung.

“How can you not be motivated to go out there and give the fans and your teammates and yourself all that you have?” Dickey asked.

Dickey said he was gassed after six innings, but at Collins urging – who told him ride with the moment – that he kept going.

“I wanted to give them that gift,” Dickey said of the fans and why he staying in the game.

He wanted to give us a gift? What athlete has said that lately?

The Mets asked him and David Wright to record thank-you messages to the fans. They represent the heart and soul of the Mets and relate to us in a special way.

It is fitting Wright reached the club’s career hit milestone and Dickey won 20 games in this final homestand before the coldness of winter and the snows bury Citi Field and another poor season.

I wrote yesterday how it would have been good theatre for the Mets to announce extensions for them both prior to the finale. It would have generated an incredible buzz and sense of optimism for the future.

After this homestand, and seeing how the fans related to Wright Wednesday and Dickey yesterday, it is now imperative the Mets find a way to sign them both this winter and not drag this out into next season the way they did Jose Reyes.

Don’t play with the heart and soul of your team.