Feb 19

Bobby Bonilla And Jason Bay Are Highest Paid Mets Outfielders

Do you realize the two highest paid Mets outfielders are players no longer with the team?

That’s right; Jason Bay and Bobby Bonilla will make more this year than the Mets’ current outfield of Lucas Duda, Kirk Nieuwenhuis, Mike Baxter, Collin Cowgill and Marlon Byrd.

BONILLA: Will be cashing Mets checks for a long time.

BONILLA: Will be cashing Mets checks for a long time.

The Mets made both decisions to get out of bad situations and maintain cost certainty, but in this case it came back to bite them. The first thing a financial advisor tells you is previous success is not a guarantee of future success. The Mets didn’t consider that advice.

Add the $3 million buyout to what the Mets owed Bay (including interest) and it comes to $21 million, paid out in a lump sum and deferred payments over the next several years. The deal also made Bay a free agent and he signed with Seattle. That gave Bay the chance to collect from two teams. Nice deal for him.

The Mets liked the arrangement because the Bay signing was a bust and this freed money for GM Sandy Alderson.

As for Bonilla, the Mets wanted to release him prior to the 2000 season, but didn’t want to eat the $5.9 million on his contract. Instead, the Mets agreed to a 25-year, $29.8 million deferred plan that pays Bonilla nearly $1.2 million annually. Including his pension, income from the Players Association and whatever investments he owns, Bonilla has a great retirement package. Oh, I forgot, there’s also social security.

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Feb 18

Mets Matters: Daniel Murphy To Be Examined; Pitching Probables

The Mets’ first injury of spring training is Daniel Murphy, who is back in New York to have an intercostal muscle in his ribs examined and receive a possible cortisone injection.

Murphy complained of feeling a tugging feeling in his ribs and will be examined at the Hospital of Special Surgery.

This is not a new injury for the Mets, as David Wright and Scott Hairston had the same last spring, but both were on the Opening Day roster.

Murphy is thinking he’ll be down from a week to ten days. Murphy said he experienced similar pain last year and attributed it to a minor change in his stance.

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Feb 17

Delcos Sunday Column: Wright Being The Mets’ Jeter

As usual, David Wright was attempting to be modest when he downplayed owner Fred Wilpon’s comments this week that he “is the Mets’ Derek Jeter.’’

Statistically, there’s not a comparison, in that Jeter has over 3,000 hits and five World Series rings and is a slam dunk Hall of Famer if he didn’t play another game. Unquestionably, he’s in on the first ballot. There’s no denying is greatness as a player.

As for Wright, he hits for more power, but will have to turn it on for the remainder of his contract if he’s to catch Jeter in a number of statistical categories.

As a clutch player, Jeter has few peers.

Defensively, both are good at their positions. Both can run.

Of course, Jeter has played longer and with a better team, so his numbers would be superior.

However, Wilpon wasn’t talking about statistics. Wilpon was referring to the intangibles both bring to their respective teams. These are qualities that can’t be measured.

Jeter is the Yankees’ captain and I expect Terry Collins to make a similar appointment to Wright, although neither needs an official designation to know they are the leaders of their teams.

When something happens in baseball or with their teams, both are sought after as being the player spokesman. Writers know articles with quotes from Wright and Jeter seem to be more authoritative. When you want the temperature of the Mets, one talks to Wright. When you want it of the Yankees, Jeter is the guy.

Both are players the younger guys look up, and both have no problems calling out somebody who doesn’t hustle or makes a mistake. When a pitcher needs calming down, you’ll see both go to the mound.

Both are the respective faces of their teams. Both are their current identities. Unquestionably, both are the players the fans pay to see.

Both have the intangibles you can see and feel, but there is no statistical measure.

And, you can’t imagine either in another team’s uniform. That’s why free agency never really applied to either. Despite his coy references, you knew Jeter wasn’t going anywhere.

And, despite the Mets’ economic crunch, I never had the feeling Wright would leave on his own. Jeter will retire a Yankee and go to the Hall of Fame. Wright will retire a Met, and if he finishes the second half of his career like the first half, he too, should see Cooperstown.

That’s what Wilpon meant.

Feb 15

Jose Reyes Rips Marlins’ Owner Over Trade

I couldn’t help but laugh out loud when I read the ESPN story about Jose Reyes being angry with Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria for trading him to Toronto.

Mark Buehrle said the same thing after the trade months earlier.

REYES: Sees it from both sides now.

REYES: Sees it from both sides now.

“I was shocked, because Jeffrey Loria, he always told me he’s never going to trade me,’’ Reyes said. “He always called my agent and said, ‘Tell Jose to get a good place here to live.’ ’’

Reyes said he even met with Loria days before the trade and there was no mention of the trade.

Are you tearing up, yet?

Maybe everything Reyes said is true, but wasn’t there a time when he said he wanted to stay with the Mets and finish he career playing next to David Wright? There was also a time when Reyes said he would do what was best for him and the Mets would do what was best for them.

And, after signing a six-year, $106-million contract with the Marlins he never looked back on the Mets. It wasn’t a pleasant divorce for Reyes from the Mets, and also the fans here who greeted him with boos upon his initial return and mostly apathy later in the summer.

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Feb 14

Spring Wright Of Passage: Oh, Say Can You “C”

john franco captain

It’s been eight years since the last time a Met donned a “C” on his uniform. Met Hall of Famer John Franco was the last player to serve as a Mets captain; his reign lasting from 2001-2004.

In what seems to have become an annual ritual for the last 3-4 years, like placing a bet on Kentucky Derby, the subject of naming David Wright the team captain came up once again. This time it reared it’s head during manager Terry Collin’s state of the Mets address held on Tuesday at Tradition Field in Port St. Lucie.

Interestingly enough, Collins sounded like the whole matter was overblown and tried to make light of it. “He knows he’s the guy,” Collins said. “He knows he’s the man here. This is his team. He’s the face of it. He’s the captain.”

And then, with a twinkle in his eye, Collins said, “Does he need a ‘C’ on his jersey? Well No. 2 doesn’t have a ‘C’ on his jersey.”

I love this guy… Of course he was referring to Derek Jeter, but more importantly Collins seems to share the same disdain for that damned “C” as I do. I thought it looked ridiculous on Franco, and I thought it looked even worse on Gary carter and Keith Hernandez.

You want to ceremoniously name David Wright captain? Go ahead and do it, it makes no difference to me. But please, for God’s sake, no “C” on the uniform. I think it’s so cheesy ( I hate using that word) and it ruins the look of what I think are the best uniforms in baseball.

“Are we going to have a press conference to make David Wright the captain?, said Collins. “I don’t see one coming, but that’s not saying it’s not going to happen.”

O Captain. My Captain

O Captain. My Captain