Aug 16

Barring Collapse, Collins Deserves Multi-Year Extension

It was typical ManagerSpeak by Terry Collins when he recently told reporter he wasn’t thinking about his contract status.

Really? It’s only natural to wonder just little. He wouldn’t be human if he didn’t. I don’t think Collins wants to go the Walter Alston route and sign 24 consecutive one-year contracts although the Mets would love that scenario.

COLLINS: What's he really thinking? (AP)

COLLINS: What’s he really thinking? (AP)

I’m telling you, I don’t think about it,’’ Collins said.

O.K, if you don’t, then allow me.

GM Sandy Alderson’s are to: 1) keep going year-to-year with Alderson, which is probably the Mets’ preference, but not to Collins’ liking, 2) cut Collins loose, which would be blatantly unfair, especially if the Mets make the playoffs, and 3) sign Collins to a multi-year extension, which is the fairest option of all, especially with a playoff appearance.

The last few years Collins was extended despite coming off losing seasons, but was given a pass because of injuries and management’s inability to acquire serious talent in the offseason. Other teams might not have given him that benefit of doubt and would have cut him loose.

Injuries have definitely affected the Mets this season – David Wright, Zack Wheeler and several relievers – and it wasn’t until recently that Alderson went into the trade market.

Should the Mets’ playoff ship be scuttled with September’s schedule – which isn’t brutally hard – then I can see Alderson getting a new manager.

But, starting over isn’t what this club needs. It requires consistency, and that’s keeping Collins and his staff. Being swept by the Pirates over the weekend at Citi Field should have no bearing on Collins stature. But, what it should do is serve as a reminder there are no givens. If nothing else, the Mets should be grateful the Nationals are in a horrific slide.

Should the Mets make the playoffs – and it doesn’t matter how – Collins should be rewarded with a multi-year extension. I’m thinking two years, or two plus an option.

Through injuries and a minimal influx of talent, Collins has the Mets playing exciting, competitive baseball. They will “play meaningful baseball in September.’’

That’s what we’ve always wanted and it looks as if it will happen. Collins is part of that and should be rewarded.

Aug 09

A Lot Riding On Wright’s Return

I am cautiously optimistic as I post the following: Mets third baseman and captain David Wright will start a rehab assignment Monday with Class A St. Lucie.

Knock on wood. Don’t walk under a ladder. Throw salt over your shoulder. Cross your fingers. Do whatever it takes to get him back to Flushing soon and in one piece.

WRIGHT: A lot riding on rehab. (AP)

WRIGHT: A lot riding on rehab. (AP)

After winning seven straight, the Mets have dropped their last two to the Rays to fall a scant 1.5 games ahead of Washington. I said it yesterday and will say it again, forget the wild card and go for the division. Wright will help immensely in that regard.

Of all their position players, Wright is the one the Mets can ill-afford to lose the most because of what he represents: he’s their best hitter; he’s a team leader; he’s their biggest investment; he represents the Mets past, present and future.

Yes, there’s a lot riding on this.Wright sustained a right hamstring strain Aug. 14 against Philadelphia, and while on the disabled list was subsequently diagnosed with spinal stenosis, which is a narrowing of the spinal column. After spending most of the summer in Los Angeles undergoing physical therapy, Wright just spent five straight days of baseball activity, which is throwing, fielding grounders and taking batting practice.

What happens tomorrow is what realty counts as it best proximates what he’ll hopefully be doing the remainder of the season and into October – deep into October.

“There’s not much more preparation I can do other than games,’’ Wright told reporters last week when the Mets were in Miami.

Wright’s return is critical to the Mets on a number of fronts. First, if he’s close to form, it gives the Mets’ offense a jumpstart and deepens their bench and batting order.

That’s the most immediate impact.

Secondly, it should help determine the Mets’ offseason priorities: Will they need another third baseman? Will Wright need to change positions? Will a healthy Wright decrease the chances of keeping Daniel Murphy or Kelly Johnson, and possibly Juan Uribe? If Wright can’t make it, was his extension a waste and how will it effect their future spending?

No, this won’t be just a normal roster move when Wright returns. This could be roster, and possibly, franchise defining.


Aug 01

Of The New Guys, Who Stays?

Unquestionably, the Mets are a better team today than a week ago. They added depth with Kelly Johnson and Juan Uribe; strengthened their bullpen with Tyler Clippard; and gave their offense a tremendous boost with Yoenis Cespedes.

Do they have enough now – remember, they can always add more in August with waiver deals – to overtake Washington? Yes, they are good enough to not only compete, but to win.

CESPEDES: Mets get slugger. (AP)

CESPEDES: Short stay in NY. (AP)

The NL East is theirs for the taking.

They are also better because they get to keep Zack Wheeler and Wilmer Flores. Regardless of whatever else Flores does in his Mets career, he permanently carved out a space in franchise lore.

Flores gave us a rare peak into the personal, emotional life of a professional athlete. He showed up these guys are human beings and capable of hurting with something other than a sprained ankle. Flores showed us frustration and anguish, and although you are young and rich, you can also feel the sting of rejection and embarrassment.

The whole country saw his tears Wednesday night before it fell through. Then, it saw him enjoy raw exhilaration with his game-winning homer Friday night?

Just wondering, but did his feet ever touch the ground? Yes, there are times when reality trumps fantasy.

So, I figure Flores will stay for a while, and be joined by Wheeler a year from now. But, what of the others? Let’s handicap the four acquisitions as to who they could keep next year?

CESPEDES: He’s the big prize, of course, at 29. But, he’s also going to want a monster contract. The Mets are his fourth team, which has to tell you something. If he turns out to be a good soldier with no incidents, then maybe, but I think the Mets will balk at his asking price, which would have to be a package of over $100 million. LEAVES

CLIPPARD: With Jenrry Mejia out and Jeurys Familia struggling in the second half it wouldn’t be surprising if he muscles into a closer role. He won’t be cheap, but he’s probably worth considering. STAYS

JOHNSON: I don’t know what will happen with Flores or David Wright, but Johnson is a reliable, versatile bench player. He’ll have some value, but don’t be surprised if they dumpster dive. LEAVES

URIBE: He’s already made a positive mark, but he’ll be 37 in March and I believe the Mets will seek younger options, including Dilson Herrera. LEAVES


The Mets picked quality this week and got to hold onto Flores and Wheeler. The latter contacted Alderson after the deal fell through and asked to be traded.

We’ll see next July, but for now the Mets have done well, and Flores continues to walk on air.

Jul 28

Pointless Second Guessing Begins After Tulowitzki-Reyes Trade

In the wake of the Troy Tulowitzki-Jose Reyes deal comes the predictable second-guessing on why the Mets weren’t active for either. Reportedly, they asked about Tulowitzki, but we’ve been hearing that for years. Maybe the Rockies didn’t call the Mets for a last chance to make a deal simply because they knew they wouldn’t bite.

And, they shouldn’t have. And, they shouldn’t have gone after Reyes, either.

REYES: Reunion would have been bad idea. (AP)

REYES: Reunion would have been bad idea. (AP)

They were smart to pass on both and for similar reasons, primarily health and financial. Both have injury histories in recent years and the Mets already have a $20-million-a-year player who is breaking down in David Wright.

For a rebuilding team, why add another?

Nobody knows what prospects the Mets dangled, but they were wise not to spend their blue-chip pitchers. With the prime prospects off the table, it boiled down to lower-tier prospects and perhaps the Rockies liked what the Blue Jays offered over what the Mets were willing to spend. When it comes to prospects, it’s all subjective.

I know Mets fans are enamored with both players, and either would have been a good fit four or five years ago. Times change. Either player, healthy and in their prime, would have been terrific, but the Mets weren’t willing to pay the price. And, both are health risks and Reyes is past his prime.

Tulowitzki is having an All-Star season, but I keep waiting for the release he’s going back on the DL. He’s 30, but hasn’t played in as many as 150 games since 2009.

As for Reyes, there were a multitude of reasons why the Mets let him walk after the 2011 season: 1) it was a choice between him or Wright as to whom to give the $100-million contract; 2) Reyes, a player who makes his living with his legs, was showing break-down signs; 3) they knew Reyes wanted every last dollar.

Only once since 2008 did Reyes play in as many as 150 games, and that was 2012, his first year with the Marlins when he played in 160. The next year, because of another leg injury, he played in 93 his first season with Toronto.

You rarely saw Reyes run in the second half of the 2011 season, his last in New York. That’s because he went on the DL twice with leg injuries and was saving himself for the free-agent market. That he left his final game on his own after locking up the NL batting crown was indicative of how much he wanted to leave, and his whining the Mets never pursued him was just for show. Point is, Reyes only wanted to stay if the Mets broke the bank and begged him, and the Mets wanted him to leave. They did make a reasonable offer (less than $100 million) but didn’t chase him.

Reyes is 32 and his best running years are behind him, as including this year he has 61 steals in the past three years. He has a .322 on-base percentage with a 38-17 strikeouts-walks ratio, not good for a leadoff hitter.

I know Mets fans like Reyes, and for a time he put on a dynamic show. Yes, he’s the franchise’s best ever shortstop, but you have to wonder why he’s on his fourth team since 2011.

It has been said some of the best trades are the ones you don’t make and such is the case with both players.

Jul 23

Alderson Calls Into Question His Believability

He wouldn’t be Sandy Alderson if he weren’t snide and condescending. The Mets’ general manager told reporters this afternoon at Citi Field the team could add payroll.

“We have the ability to take on payroll,’’ Alderson told reporters, then added, “even though none of you will believe me.’’

ALDERSON: Holds court. (AP)

ALDERSON: Holds court. (AP)

Geez, Sandy, ever wonder why that is?

Could it be he’s gone back on nearly every player-acquisition comment he’s made? Could it be hardly any of his injury update statements have proven false? Could it be “Mr. Panic City” has made a habit of being flippant and rude? And, let’s not even start with the shortstop and leadoff decisions, not to mention talk of 90 wins.

Late last month Alderson was quoted in the New York Daily News saying it was within his budget to acquire a pricey, impact bat. Now, Aramis Ramirez – who is none of those things is reportedly on his way to Pittsburgh – there’s no interest in Justin Upton, and now even Oakland’s Ben Zobrist, who is making around $4 million, is too expensive.

I’m just wondering who this middle-of-the-order, inexpensive quality bat is and where he’s coming from?

It’s hard to tell if the Mets are buyers or sellers, considering they will still entertain offers for Jon Niese, Friday’s starter, who has been exceptional the past two months.

If the Mets are to contend they need hitting, but they’ll also need what Niese is giving them, which they apparently won’t get from Bartolo Colon or Dillon Gee.

Niese is under contract through 2016 and with the Mets holding a club option for 2017 and 2018. They would be open to dealing Niese if the contract they would take on has similar parameters.

So, I don’t see Niese leaving any time soon.

And, not coming any time soon is David Wright, who Alderson said would resume baseball activity next week in New York.

Of course, we’ve heard that several times since Wright went on the disabled list in April.