Sep 10

Mets’ Matt Harvey Wants To Avoid Surgery

Matt Harvey, the New York Mets’ best story of the season before an elbow injury sidelined him until, well, who really knows when?

Not Harvey, anyway. Harvey, speaking at an appearance at a Manhattan firehouse this afternoon along with David Wright, Zack Wheeler and CEO Jeff Wilpon, is insistent of eschewing surgery.

HARVEY: Doesn't want surgery.

HARVEY: Doesn’t want surgery.

“Everything feels fine. My arm feels great,’’ Harvey said. “I’m still very optimistic about everything. But I’m not a doctor, so we’ll see what happens.’’

Harvey is scheduled for a second opinion with Dr. James Andrews next week. Harvey said his arm feels “great,’’ but then again, he hasn’t pitched since Aug. 24 against Detroit, so it should feel good.

However, that time off hasn’t healed a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow. Harvey is hoping the tear will heal itself with rest, but there exists the risk of him going into next season and tearing it worse and possibly missing all of 2015.

As it is, if Harvey opts for surgery, there is a chance he could pitch at the end of next season.

“If we do go the surgery route, having it sooner so maybe I can get back in September next year if that’s an 11-month process, that’s a possibility,’’ Harvey said. “But, like I said, we haven’t gotten that far. I’m not an M.D., so I don’t really know those answers.’’

Andrews should be able to provide those answers next week. In the interim, Harvey said he’ll talk with as many people as he can, but ultimately the decision is his.

There are no guarantees with or without surgery, but the odds might be in his favor if he takes the knife.

General manager Sandy Alderson has long projected 2014 as the year the Mets could reach competitive status because the contract of Johan Santana will be off the books and the team should have the latitude to spend this winter.

Alderson said the plan, as it should be, is to plan for 2014 without Harvey, and that includes shopping for a veteran free agent in the off-season.

The Mets might consider the Yankees’ Phil Hughes, whose style might be better acclimated to the larger Citi Field than bandbox Yankee Stadium.

Hughes, battered this season, has been demoted to the bullpen.

However, he’s healthy, and at 28, is young enough to turn it around, and the Mets could provide that opportunity.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 10

What Is The Reason Why You Still Watch The Mets?

Once Zack Lutz became a New York Mets trivia answer, what was the reason to watch Monday night? What is the reason to watch, to listen, to read about the Mets anymore this season? Is the big attraction now to avoid sinking past the season-low 15 games below .500?

If you’re a reader of this, or any other blog, you’re a Mets fan and watch because that’s what you do. I’ve never liked the expression “die hard fan,’’ because it means you eventually give up and die. I also don’t like “long suffering fan,’’ because why would you do anything that makes you suffer? You might as well say “put my hand on a hot stove’’ fan.

BELIEVING

                                                                             BELIEVING

You  might be frustrated and disgusted by watching the Mets lose 9-0 to the Nationals, but it is far better than not having any Mets to watch at all.

October has to be the worst month because there’s baseball, but baseball without the Mets. At least in November there’s the start of the free-agent season, highlighted by the Winter Meetings, which is winter’s World Series.

January? You can see spring training from there, and February, regardless of the wind chill, gives us our first warming taste of summer.

It’s not like a greater force mandated you become a Mets’ fan. In some families you might be born into it, but eventually it becomes your choice to root for the Mets.

You rooted in the beginning when they lost 120 games. You rooted throughout the sixties until you were rewarded by 1969, the year of the Miracle Mets and when man first walked on the moon.

As a Mets’ fan you endured long periods of frustration and lousy ball, but once a decade you were rewarded by the postseason, in 1973, 1986, 1999, 2000 and 2006.

In a commercial David Wright said his greatest thrill was playing October baseball in New York, “that there’s nothing like it.’’

That’s the ultimate reason we watch our team, but there’s a greater, more intimate reason why you’re fascinated, enthralled or even consumed by the Mets. There was one incident, one moment, that made you into a Mets’ fan, win or lose, and lately it has been mostly losing.

If you’re willing to share, I’d be interested to know what was the defining moment, that despite a fifth straight losing season, makes you hang on for news about Bobby Parnell’s and Matt Harvey’s looming surgeries … about Ike Davis‘ situation … about the outfield for next season.

It is why we’d like to see just one more time before the leaves change Wright’s compact swing rip a ball into the gap and him running into second with a stand-up double.

I know that’s why he’s yearning for one more game in the Summer of 2013.

What are the reasons why you still hang on to the summer?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 09

Ike Davis Could Remain With Mets

ESPN reported the New York Mets would tender Ike Davis a contract for 2014, largely because not doing so would cost them a compensatory draft pick.

Davis is making $3.1 million this year, and through the CBA, can’t be offered anything higher than a 20 percent pay cut. Reportedly, the least Davis would make is $2.4 million, which isn’t bad for nine homers and 33 RBI.

The reason GM Sandy Alderson delayed sending Davis to Triple-A Las Vegas was because of the promise of a breakout second half, which, of course, never happened.

Non-tendering a contract would have meant no compensation, so what Alderson is doing is essentially buying an insurance policy, with the worst-case scenario being forced to endure another year of non-production.

In keeping Davis, the Mets would go into spring training of him and Lucas Duda competing for the first base job.

Currently, the Mets are about getting whatever they can, which is what they did in the John Buck-Marlon Byrd deal, their reasoning with Davis, and why, despite the foul taste it gave them, they recalled Frank Francisco.

Despite all accounts but Francisco’s, the Mets believed he dogged it during rehab, he was pitching in the major leagues Sunday.

It was a last ditch effort to showcase him to a contender desperate for bullpen help, even though Francisco would not be eligible for a postseason roster.

Francisco is owed $745-thousand for the remainder of the season, which isn’t much, but better than nothing.

METS MUSINGS: Among the Mets’ call-ups is 35-year-old pitcher Aaron Harang, who might get one or two starts to serve as an audition for a spring-training invite. Harang went 5-11 with a 5.76 ERA in 22 starts with Seattle. Harang will likely pitch Saturday in one of the games of the Mets’ doubleheader with Miami. … David Wright could be with the Mets this week, but he’s not ready to play. … RHP Matt Harvey will receive a second opinion this week from Dr. James Andrews on his elbow, and after which could decide on Tommy John surgery.

METS PROBABLES vs. Washington at Citi Field:

Tonight: RHP Carlos Torres (3-3, 2.89) vs. LHP Gio Gonzalez (9-6, 3.49), 7:10 p.m.

Tomorrow: RHP Dillon Gee (11-9, 3.53) vs. RHP Jordan Zimmerman (16-8, 3.30), 7:10 p.m.

Wednesday: RHP Zack Wheeler (7-4, 3.38) vs. RHP Dan Haren (8-13, 5.23), 7:10 p.m.

Thursday: LHP Jonathon Niese (6-7, 3.86) vs. RHP Tanner Roark (5-0, 0.94), 1:10 p.m.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 04

Could Be Time For Mets To Cut Tejada Loose

A team will often speak to a player through the media, which the New York Mets appear to be doing with the potentially talented, but often moody and sullen shortstop Ruben Tejada.

Appearing on WFAN, GM Sandy Alderson said it was “like pulling teeth’’ to get him to do extra work, which is absurd.

I, for one, will simply yawn when the Mets decide they’ve had enough of Tejada’s sorry act and cut him clean.

Remember, the Mets are a building team trying to establish a new culture, and that culture doesn’t include not hustling; not thinking about what you’re supposed to do when the ball is hit to you or about the hitting situation; or laziness.

What Tejada doesn’t understand, or care about, is the coaches are there for him. If he wants to field extra ground balls or work in the batting cage, all he has to do is ask.

I won’t insult David Wright or any other hard-working Met by comparing him to Tejada.

I wrote the other day the Mets should play Tejada for the rest of the season, but I was clearly wrong. If management still believes after his lengthy stay in the minor leagues that Tejada’s head isn’t on straight, there should be no more chances.

The Mets need production from Tejada, not for his mood attitude to pollute the atmosphere and culture the Mets are trying to establish.

I don’t want to hear anything about Tejada having a rough childhood, or a language misunderstanding. Playing major league baseball is not a right, but an earned privilege.

If Tejada doesn’t want to put the work in, get rid of him. It’s not as if the Mets will be losing anything. There are dozens of players who would be eager to take his spot, and one of them could be better.

Alderson also said Matt Harvey’s injury will have the team dipping into the free-agent market, which is an obvious sign the Mets aren’t expecting him back. Alderson also said the injury, which is up to Harvey to decide on surgery, could force the Mets’ hand and bring up prospects Rafael Montero or Jacob deGrom.

He didn’t say anything about innings counts.

Finally, it was reported the Mets will wait until the off-season before debating what to do with Davis.

Why?

The Mets have long known about Davis’ contractual status and should have an idea by know. Same with Tejada.

The winter isn’t that long.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 01

Ike Davis Injury Should Open Door For Wilmer Flores At First Base

With Ike Davis likely playing his last game with the New York Mets because of a strained right oblique sustained Saturday afternoon the Mets are presented a golden opportunity to further get answers for next season.

However, what Terry Collins said he’ll do and what he should do are two different things. Collins suggested Lucas Duda getting most of the time, with Josh Satin sprinkled in and Wilmer Flores to get a look once David Wright returns.

DAVIS: Frustration defines career with Mets.

DAVIS: Frustration defines career with Mets.

No, no, no, a thousand times no. If it is believed Collins retaining his job is predicated not on record, but other mitigating circumstances, Justin Turner should be playing third and Flores should be getting the lion’s share of the time.

One of the primary objectives of the Mets the last month should be determining where Flores could play, and we know it won’t be third base because of Wright. And, it shouldn’t be second because Daniel Murphy is a good enough option.

The only other place I would try is shortstop to evaluate his range. If not Flores, then reinsert Ruben Tejada to see if he learned anything in the minor leagues.

For the most part we know about Duda. He hasn’t shown us anything over the past two years to suggest he’ll give the Mets the consistent power the Mets hoped for.

Davis, it likely will be presumed, is done with the Mets as the team probably won’t tender him a contract and let him talk as a free agent.

First base is a position needing a bat, and if Flores can handle it, he’s the best choice.

Ironically, Davis was injured driving in a run with a sacrifice fly. I know, it’s cruel, but that’s what irony can be. For what Davis produced this season, he was not worth $3 million. He’s certainly not worthy of a raise.

GM Sandy Alderson would not speculate on Davis’ future with the Mets, talking yesterday in typical GM-speak: “You have to take into account the entire body of work, as abridged as it might be. It’s what we have available to us and what we’ll use to evaluate him and where we are going into next season.’’

Davis said the oblique had been bothering him for months, but subsided recently. He would not say if the injury had been reported and he was receiving treatment.

Considering the nature of Davis’ tenuous position with the Mets, one would understand him being quiet about an injury, but if true it wouldn’t be any less stupid.

Injuries, if you’re a Met, always come to the surface. In this case, if handled properly, it could give the Mets an answer looking ahead.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos