Nov 17

Collins Deserves Manager Of Year Award

The popular choice is Joe Maddon of the Cubs, but the right choice for NL Manager of the Year has to be the Mets’ Terry Collins. Considering all he went through this summer, and the preceding four years, how can it be anybody else?

Seriously, how can it be?

COLLINS: Deserves Manager of Year Award. (AP)

COLLINS: Deserves Manager of Year Award.

In normal seasons, Maddon is a great and easy choice, but the Cubs were consistently good this summer, and he is the popular, sexy pick because of the history of his team. But, what about Collins?

The Mets kicked away an 11-game winning streak to fall below .500. With David Wright out for over four months; Travis d’Arnaud also out for an extended period; there was a patchwork bullpen; and a team last in scoring in the NL at the trade deadline; and a young rotation, including Matt Harvey coming off Tommy John surgery, there were few that had the Mets finishing .500, much less reaching the World Series.

Yet, with their season crumbling and rumors Collins’ job was in jeopardy, he held his team together. Unlike other losing teams where players don’t hustle and point fingers, Collins’ players played hard for him, which is the ultimate sign a manager has their respect.

This award is voted on prior to the playoffs, so the Mets’ sweep of the Cubs can’t be considered. All too often, this is a popularity contest, which is why I can see Maddon getting this. But, the expectations of Collins’ Mets were low. He kept his team together and playing hard. He had the Mets overachieving, if there is such a thing.

Maddon and the Cardinals’ Mike Matheny also had outstanding years and normally would be deserving. But, this year, Collins deserves it most.


Nov 06

Mets Make Qualifying Offer To Murphy

The Mets’ first order of postseason business was extending manager Terry Collins for two years, and their second step was to make Daniel Murphy to a one-year, $15.8-million qualifying offer. He has a week to respond.

As with Collins, the Murphy deal was a no-brainer for the following reasons:

MURPHY:  Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

MURPHY: Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

1) If Murphy rejects the offer the Mets would receive a compensatory draft pick from the team that signs him.

2) The Mets are currently reluctant to give Murphy the reported figure of $50 million over four years. Before going long-term with Murphy, the Mets must first figure out if his post-season power run was an aberration or a sign of things to come.

3) That question could possibly be answered this year. Keeping Murphy around for another year could also enable them to figure out David Wright’s physical status and bide time for Ruben Tejada to heal.

If those two health issues are realized, Murphy would be a capable insurance policy.

If Murphy’s power surge is not a fluke the Mets will probably have to cough up more than if they signed him to a multi-year deal now, but that’s a gamble they would have to take.

Should the Mets be willing to go long-term on Murphy, he could give them a home-team discount.

“I like it here, and I’d like to come back,’’ Murphy said after the World Series. “I feel blessed to have been a Met this long.’’

Murphy was a 13th-round round pick of the Mets in 2006.

Among the teams that might have interest in Murphy are both Los Angeles teams, San Francisco and the Yankees.

NOTEBOOK:  The team said center fielder Juan Lagares will not require surgery on his right elbow. Lagares had a breakout season in 2014 and was rewarded with a multi-year contract, but regressed this season and had difficulty throwing. … Outfielder Michael Cuddyer underwent surgery to repair a core muscle injury. He will make $12.5 million in 2016. … LH reliever Josh Smoker was added to the 40-man roster. … A published report from Washington said the Mets could be interested in outfielder Denard Span, who was not given a qualifying offer by the Nationals.

Nov 02

Harvey Should Take Some Responsibility

There are a lot of reasons why the Mets aren’t in Kansas City today, why their unlikely season isn’t continuing. Terry Collins, being the man he is, took responsibility last night, but it’s not all on him.

Fingers are being pointed in all directions. At David Wright for cutting in front of shortstop Wilmer Flores on that grounder in the ninth. At Lucas Duda for his poor throw, and the bullpen and lack of hitting. All deserve responsibility, but nobody is blaming Matt Harvey, which is wrong.

HARVEY: Diva does it again (AP)

HARVEY: Diva does it again (AP)

Much of the storylines this season were about Harvey, and such was the case last night, when with the sporting world watching, he made it all about him. I don’t want to hear any of this Dark Knight crap. Hell, even Batman had to answer to Commissioner Gordon.

Harvey knew the cameras were on on him when pitching coach Dan Warthen told him he was done. He always knows where the cameras are it seems, and knew they would follow him to Collins.

I softened on Harvey lately, but not after last night. Not anymore, or to quote the Mets’ diva, “No way.’’

With the Mets desperately trying to prolong their season, Harvey made it all about him again.

“I want this game bad,’’ Harvey told his manager. Of course, the operative word in that sentence was “I.’’

Never mind his manager, who backed him and tried to protect him all year. Never mind his teammates. Never mind the frustrated Mets’ fan base. When a team wins a championship, it takes 25 players. All of them, but that’s not how Harvey sees it. He sees it as he being the superhero. He craves the glory.

We are in the ninth inning of the most important game of the Mets’ season and Harvey basically told his manager, “screw you … I am pitching.’’ He told his teammates he cared more about his personal glory than them.

Again, as he frequently has done, he made himself bigger than his team, and last night, bigger than the game.

He has that attitude because all his life people kissed his Bat Belt. In high school, in college, and now with the Mets. GM Sandy Alderson and Collins are to blame because they caved to his petulant demands, and the latter, to his dismay, did so again last night.

A hundred pitches is Harvey’s weakness. After 100 pitches opposing hitters are batting .373 off him with a .440 on-base percentage and .448 slugging percentage. Harvey was over 100 pitches when Collins sent Warthen to pull him.

Where Collins was wrong was not doing it himself and for waffling. Where Collins was wrong was in trusting Harvey more than his gut. Hopefully, Collins won’t make that mistake again.

I raised this point during the height of Harvey’s innings fiasco, and it is time to do so again. With Zack Wheeler coming back, and Yoenis Cespedes leaving, and Harvey being a selfish diva, it is time for the Mets to explore what they can get for him.

Yes, Harvey was sensational last night for eight innings, but in a flash his selfishness wiped that away and that’s my enduring image from this World Series.

I haven’t read any admission of taking responsibility from Harvey, but, I haven’t read The Player’s Tribune, yet. Surely, it is in there.


Nov 02

Collins Falls On Sword For Harvey

There are plenty of fingers to he pointed in defeat, but the only thing I can blame Terry Collins for was not following his gut. He wanted to pull Matt Harvey; he wanted to give the ball to his snake bit closer Jeurys Familia with a clean inning.

“No way,’’ Harvey screamed at the manager who tried to protect him all year. And in defeat, Collins trusted him again.

“He said, `I want this game. I want it bad,’ ’’ Collins said. “I let my heart get in the way of my gut. … It was inexcusable.’’

HARVEY: ``No way.'' Yes, way. (Getty)

HARVEY: “No way.” Yes, way. (Getty)

If Collins stayed with his gut and the Mets bullpen blew it, he would have been vilified. If Collins pulled Harvey after the walk and the bullpen blew it then, he would have been roasted for that.

“If you’re going to send him out there for one hitter, you shouldn’t sent him out there at all,’’ Collins said.

But, it wasn’t just that decision. The Mets’ defense played poorly; the bullpen was always on shaky ground; and the offense, well, it didn’t exist. Four hits tonight were not going to get it done.

Collins accepted responsibility, but there were others to share blame.

In the end, nobody expected the Mets to get this far, and I’m talking about more than reaching the World Series. Entering the season, the goal was to get to .500. They lapped that expectation.

As the Royals celebrated in the middle of the infield and Citi Field grew quiet, the TV cameras focused on David Wright, who stared blankly to the field.

All I could think about was how empty he felt, and I hoped he would feel that way for a long time as it is a feeling to build on.


Oct 30

Mets World Series Game 3 Lineups

Down by two games, the Mets will opt for greater offense in Game 3 tonight by starting Michael Conforto in left field and sit Juan Lagares. Here’s tonight’s lineups:

Curtis Granderson – RF

David Wright – 3B

Daniel Murphy – 2B

Yoenis Cespedes – CF

Lucas Duda – 1B

Travis d’Arnaud – C

Michael Conforto – LF

Wilmer Flores – SS

Noah Syndergaard – RHP

COMMENTS: Other than Conforto, there are no surprises tonight from manager Terry Collins. At this point of the season there’s no reason for switching things up on a major scale. … The issue isn’t where they hit in the lineup, but if they’ll start hitting. So far, Lucas Duda is the hottest. There’s been no show of power, but plenty of strikeouts.