Feb 23

Wrapping Up The Day: Exhibition Starters Announced; Flores To Get Shortstop Time

New York Mets manager Terry Collins announced the starting pitchers for the first cycle of exhibition games, beginning Friday against Washington.

Rafael Montero, John Lannan, Daisuke Matsuzaka, Noah Syndergaard and Jonathon Niese will start the first five games. The relievers weren’t announced.

In addition:

* Collins praised Wilmer Flores’ off-season conditioning and reiterated he will get a look at shortstop. Wilmer took grounders at shortstop and second Sunday.

* Collins also was complimentary of catching prospect Kevin Plawecki, especially with his off-season potential.

* David Wright, Curtis Granderson and Daniel Murphy aren’t expected to play much during the first week of games.

* Zack Wheeler threw batting practice.

Feb 22

Wrapping Up The Day: Matt Harvey Throws; Mets Re-Fi; Collins To Ease In Vets

Matt Harvey’s first throwing session and news of the New York Mets’ refinancing their debt incurred from the Ponzi ruling were today’s most significant developments from the Mets’ spring training camp in Port St. Lucie.

Harvey made 20 throws on flat ground from 60 feet Saturday morning and described his feelings as “awesome.’’

Harvey will continue to throw on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. He described it as part of a process and acknowledged he must resist the urge to throw harder.

In addition:

* The Mets’ application to refinance was accepted with the organization several weeks away from having to make a $250-million payment. The five-year loan was priced at Libor plus 3.25 percent.

* Saturday was the first day of full-squad workouts. John Lannan, Gonzalez Germen, Rafael Montero and Scott Rice were among the pitchers to throw live batting practice.

* Manager Terry Collins plans to “ease’’ his veterans into spring training games. Daniel Murphy, David Wright and Curtis Granderson aren’t expected to play the first week.

* Overall, Collins is pleased with the workouts. “I have never seen the drills done with more enthusiasm, with more energy without major mistakes than we have in the last six days. It’s incredible,’’ Collins said.

* Prospect Erik Goeddel will work as a reliever during spring training and the regular season, said general manager Sandy Alderson, whose reasoning is the Mets’ starting pitching depth in the minors.

* Alderson will delay the decision where Harvey will rehab this season. He prefers Port St. Lucie; Harvey wants New York. Since there’s no need to make a decision now, he’ll wait to later in camp.

* Alderson expressed no regrets in the Mets signing outfielder Chris Young and not waiting to sign Nelson Cruz, who just agreed to an $8-million, one-year contract with Baltimore. That’s $750-thousand more than they’ll pay Young.

 

Feb 21

Looking At Mets’ Leadoff Situation

The primary objective for the New York Mets in their quest for a leadoff hitter is the combination of speed, base-running ability and on-base percentage.

Eric Young has the first two, but manager Terry Collins wants him to improve his on-base percentage. Young’s career on-base percentage is .325, and Collins is thinking of at least 25 more points.

YOUNG: Should bunt more.

YOUNG: Should bunt more.

“Ideally, you’d wish he’d have a .350 on-base,’’ Collins said earlier this week. “I don’t know if he’s going to, but you hope he does.

“All I know is what an impact this guy made on our team when we got him. He got some big hits, made some great plays defensively in the outfield. And when he got on, exciting things happened and we scored runs.

“So we’re certainly going to focus a lot on trying to get Eric to bunt a little bit more, maybe be a little more selective at the plate.’’

Even at .350, that pales compared to Rickey Henderson (.401) and Pete Rose (.375), two of the greatest leadoff hitters in history.

The Mets want Young to improve his walks-to-strikeouts ratio, which was a poor 35-67 last season in only 418 plate appearances and to bunt more.

With his speed, if Young averaged one bunt hit a week, that would be 26 additional for the season. Give Young 26 more hits over the same number of at-bats last year and his average would have been .320.

Collins prefers Young in the leadoff role over Daniel Murphy (lacks speed), Chris Young or Juan Lagares (low on-base percentage and too many strikeouts), or Ruben Tejada (low on-base percentage).

 

Feb 10

Mets Who Could Be On The Trading Block In July

Realistically, the New York Mets could be a .500 team if everything breaks right. That’s an improvement of at least one more victory a month, which isn’t unrealistic. However, let’s say it unravels early for them and it becomes apparent they have no shot at a wild card berth much less finishing at .500 or better.

What then?

GEE: Could draw trade interest.

GEE: Could draw trade interest.

Should they opt to scuttle their ship, and go from buyers to sellers, they have numerous assets they might unload. And, none are their young pitchers.

Here’s where they could start:

Dillon Gee: He’s under appreciated, yet consistent and an innings eater. Last season he gave them 199 and overall was their most durable and consistent starter. If the Mets can’t appreciate |that, somebody else will. He’s attractive because of his consistency, willingness to take the ball, and reasonable contract. If he’s healthy and having good season, teams could be lining up for him.

Daisuke Matsuzaka: Should they bring up Noah Syndergaard and he pitches well and there are no injuries in the rotation, Matsuzaka could draw interest from a contender. Especially, if he’s pitching like he did in his final three 2014 starts.

John Lannan: The same applies to Lannan as Matsuzaka. He’s not in their long-term plans so get what they can.

Kyle Farnsworth: If the Mets are cooked by midseason and Farnsworth is pitching well, teams are always looking for a reliable reliever.

Taylor Teagarden: He has a contract clause that allows him to leave if he’s not on the major league roster by June. So, if both Travis d’Arnaud and Anthony Recker show the catching situation is in good hands. It makes sense to showcase him.

Ike Davis: The assumption is if he’s shown anything in the first half. If there’s some run production, somebody might bite. They certainly didn’t during the winter. Davis has to show some measure of progress because teams had no interest over the winter.

Lucas Duda: Pretty much everything that applied to Davis does for Duda. Also, if one is outperforming the other, they can keep the hot bat and deal the other.

Daniel Murphy: He will make $5 million this year, but over half will be eaten by the end of July. That’s a reasonable contract for a consistent hitter. Should Wilmer Flores demonstrate he can play the position, it might push the Mets to deal Murphy.

Eric Young: Another with a doable contract. He came to the Mets because they needed speed and a leadoff hitter. Surely, there might be another contender who would need the same.

Chris Young: I still don’t know why the Mets signed him to a one-year, $7.25 million contract. If he doesn’t play well it is a waste and there will be likely no interest. However, if he performs, the Mets won’t go high in re-signing him and with only a one-year deal teams could show interest.

So, there you have it. Out of a 25-man roster, the Mets have ten chips. Most are average, but the potential to help a contender. They probably won’t bring back much, but in the Mets’ position stockpiling players is a positive.

None of these players are untouchable or seemingly in their long-term plans. You might make a case for Davis if he’s broken out of his funk, but they’ve been saying that for three years.

Feb 05

Mets’ Latest Plan For Ike Davis

Recent news coming out of Port St. Lucie concerning New York Mets giving first baseman Ike Davis at least 90 at-bats is interesting.

The first being the Mets will have a short leash this spring with Davis. They’ll give him every opportunity to start strong to win and keep the job.

DAVIS: Still in Mets' plans.

DAVIS: Still in Mets’ plans.

Theoretically, this should eliminate the slow starts that defined his last two seasons and sent him to the minors last year. This shouldn’t be interpreted as Davis being handed the job as in the two previous years.

He’d better make good use of those 90 at-bats.

“In the past you look to get him 60-70 at-bats,’’ Collins told The New York Post. “Well, he’s going to get at least 90. Yeah, he might get a little tired, but he’s too big a piece. We have to know what we have there.’’

Davis, at 26, has an upside evidenced by 32 homers hit in 2012. They know what they could have. They also know what they have had, meaning a low on-base percentage and batting average, lots of strikeouts and little run production.

Lucas Duda moved ahead of Davis last season when he improved his on-base percentage, but his run production was miniscule. The knock on him is he became too selective and passed on money pitches.

The Mets will also be aware of giving Duda his at-bats during spring training unless Davis doesn’t pan out or can’t deal him.

GM Sandy Alderson has tied to deal Davis since the end of the season, much to the anger of his father, former Yankees pitcher, Ron Davis, who ripped the Mets for being too open about their intentions.

In doing so, their asking price was scoffed at as being too high.

That’s something they can’t go back on, so Davis still won’t bring much. Plus, if he has a hot spring, he won’t be going anywhere, making Duda the more likely one to be traded.

If both Davis and Duda have miserable springs, the Mets have options in moving Daniel Murphy from second base or possibly Wilmer Flores.