Aug 30

What Mets Are Available At Waiver Deadline?

Who do the New York Mets have of value that might help a contender? The player with the most is probably the guy I wrote about yesterday as unappreciated, and that is Daniel Murphy.

Understand, I like Murphy, but for the purpose of this exercise, you have to recognize what others might see in him.

He doesn’t have great power, but can drive the ball in the gaps. He also has a good on-base percentage and ability to extend rallies.

He can play second, first and third, and in the American League serve as a designated hitter.

Murphy said he wouldn’t mind sharing second base with Wilmer Flores, but let’s not kid ourselves, he wants to play. If the Mets are convinced Flores is able to play second and are determined to go in that direction, the Mets should try to get what they can for Murphy.

Another infielder capable of servicing a contender is shortstop Omar Quintanilla, who has more than made up for Ruben Tejada. At 31, he’s not in the Mets’ plans for 2014, so why not see what they can get?

Ideally, they should recall Tejada from the minors and give him the final month to get his act straight. I’d like to see Tejada play now, and if he doesn’t cut it look for somebody in the winter.

Also appealing to a contender might be any one of three veteran relievers, LaTroy Hawkins, Pedro Feliciano and Scott Atchison.

Lastly, the Mets should have been exploring the markets for Ike Davis and Lucas Duda. I can’t imagine the Mets keeping both lefty strikeout machines next season.

Davis has played better since he was recalled from the minors, while Duda has received very little playing time.

The Mets have roughly 24 hours to make a deal with a contender; with any of above players likely to help more than anybody they might recall when the rosters are expanded.

ON HARVEY SURGERY: I have no problem with Matt Harvey talking to players such as Roy Halladay on how they handled their elbow injuries, as long as he understands no two injuries are identical. What worked for Halladay might not work for Harvey.

Whatever he decides, it won’t be for at least another two or three weeks when the inflammation has gone down and he has another MRI.

The worst-case scenario for the Mets is for him to eschew surgery with the hope of being ready for 2014, and then completing the tear in spring training or next season. In that case, Harvey might not be ready until 2016.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 29

Mets Wrap: When Will They Appreciate Daniel Murphy?

When it comes to Daniel Murphy, the New York Mets always seem to think they might have a faster gun. Murphy, a natural third baseman, couldn’t find a home in left field or first base, but the past two seasons appears to have settled in at second base.

However, just as he seems to be taking to the position, the Mets haven’t been able to resist other options. Justin Turner has been there to give him a rest; Eric Young played when Murphy briefly replaced Ike Davis at first; Jordany Valdespin got a week audition after his tantrum; and Wilmer Flores got a chance as part of the Mets’ youth movement.

MURPHY: Huge game vs. Phillies. (AP)

MURPHY: Huge game vs. Phillies. (AP

“I’d like to think of myself as a young guy, too,’’ said the 28-year-old Murphy after today’s four-hit, two-RBI outburst in an 11-3 rout of the Phillies.

Manager Terry Collins said Murphy has been tired, hitting just .233 in August, with two extra-base hits – both homers – in his previous 31 games before two doubles today. Collins said yesterday’s start with Flores was to give Murphy a rest and not meant as his job was in jeopardy.

But, that’s not the thinking of others. In talking about finding a spot for Andrew Brown, Mets analyst Bob Ojeda suggested left field and moving Young to second. In where Flores might play, regardless of what Collins said, second is the spot first mentioned.

However, in analyzing the Mets’ holes needing to be filled for 2014, there are other positions ahead of ahead of Murphy at second that are more pressing. They’ll need another starter or two if Harvey can’t pitch, and the bullpen is always an issue, especially if Bobby Parnell isn’t ready.

The Mets also have questions at shortstop and the outfield.

As for Murphy, he was named in trade rumors at the end of July, and he’s still on the table as the waiver deadline nears.

But, in the end the Mets could do far worse than playing Murphy at second base.

WRIGHT REHAB: David Wright said he wanted to play again this season before leaving to Port St. Lucie to continue his rehab. Wright also spoke to the Phillies’ Michael Young about how he rehabbed his hamstring injury. Young stressed that regardless of his rehab, it’s different and tenuous when he gets into games.

“I don’t want the next time I’m on the field to be in spring training with the uncertainty,’’ Wright said. “This is what I do. I want to play. It’s against pretty much everything I believe in to shut the season down and get ready for next season. I want to get back and join my teammates and help them finish strong.’’

METS MUSINGS: GM Sandy Alderson said surgery hasn’t been determined on Matt Harvey‘s tear in his UCL. Harvey consulted with the Phillies’ Roy Halladay, who had a similar injury that didn’t require surgery. Harvey will get a second opinion after the swelling goes down. … Carlos Torres was terrific giving up one run on four hits in 6.2 innings with six strikeouts and no walks. … Reliever Vic Black was the player-to-be-named-later in the deal with Pittsburgh. … Young had three hits including a three-run triple. … Catcher Anthony Recker hit a two-run homer on his 30th birthday. … Matt den Dekker was hitless in five at-bats with two strikeouts in his major league debut.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 28

Losing Matt Harvey Not Mets’ Only Issue

Can we please have a reality check in the wake of the New York Mets losing Matt Harvey for the remainder of this season and possibly all of 2014?

In some ways the Mets overachieved this year, but not to the point where they should be considered favorites next summer, or the following one, even with Harvey.

HARVEY: Even with him, Mets have issues.

HARVEY: Even with him, Mets have issues.

The Mets are a flawed team, and considering they just traded their two of their top three home-run and RBI leaders in Marlon Byrd and John Buck, they are even more scarred.

Without Harvey, and with Jenrry Mejia and Jeremy to have surgery, Dillon Gee, Zack Wheeler and Jon Niese are the only givens in next year’s rotation. And, Niese is coming off a slight rotator cuff tear and Wheeler will have only half a season experience on his resume.

It is imperative the Mets go on with the belief Harvey will be out indefinitely and add one or two starters. Please don’t say Daisuke Matsuzaka is enough, and even in jest, don’t suggest bringing back Johan Santana.

The Mets like catcher Travis d’Arnaud’s future, but he’s only played a handful of games. They’ll miss Buck, not only for his bat, but his ability to handle pitchers.

First base has the unappealing options of Ike Davis, Lucas Duda and Josh Satin. There’s also a hole at shortstop, with Ruben Tejada fading into past tense and Omar Quintanilla a reserve.

Second baseman Daniel Murphy could be gone, especially if the Mets opt to go with Wilmer Flores.

Left and center, as of now, appear set with Eric Young and Juan Lagares, with neither having much power. Right field, as it was this spring, is wide open. Maybe they’ll bring back Byrd. Who knows?

The bullpen has pitched well for the most part in the second half, but with Bobby Parnell facing surgery on his neck, it will be patchwork all over again.

General manager Sandy Alderson has been pointing to 2014 since he got here, saying once several bloated contracts were off the books the team will have liberty to spend.

The timetable has been pushed back at least a year with Harvey’s injury, but that’s no excuse for him to sit on his hands this winter. The Mets have at least two winters of spending before they’ll have a competitive team around Harvey and Wheeler.

They must, even if it is just in keeping with the appearances of their 2014 timetable, be aggressive this off-season.

It’s the least they can do considering all the talking they’ve done.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 27

Loss Of Matt Harvey Leads To Purge; John Buck And Marlon Byrd First To Go

Not too long ago, I wrote the New York Mets should stand pat at the trade deadline to make a run at respectability, but with Matt Harvey gone for the year, that goal has been flushed. The gurgling sound you’re now hearing is the news the Mets sent John Buck and Marlon Byrd to Pittsburgh for infield prospect Dilson Herrera and a player to be named later.

The garage sale has begun and should not stop. With the Mets’ timetable for competiveness now 2015 instead of 2014, the Mets’ thinking should be to stockpile as many prospects and draft choices as possible, which means it shouldn’t end with Byrd and Buck.

BUCK: Gone.

BUCK: Gone.

Until the Aug. 31 deadline to make waiver deals, the Mets should be shopping Daniel Murphy, LaTroy Hawkins, Ike Davis and/or Lucas Duda, Scott Atchison and anybody else not fitting in their immediate plans.

Nobody will net a top prospect, such as what the Mets received for Carlos Beltran, but at this point it doesn’t matter. It’s garage sale time, so they should take what they can get.

Byrd was having a tremendous season, well enough for him to want – and warrant – a two-year deal, or one plus an option. Based on their history, the Mets would have offered one and he would walk without the team receiving compensation.

As for Buck, he evolved as Harvey’s personal catcher, but his playing time was reduced with the addition of Travis d’Arnaud. Buck played the good soldier, but realistically, he performed well enough to look for a full time job.

It won’t be with the Mets, and with Harvey likely done until 2015; Buck would not sit around. Catchers in a pennant race, especially those with a little pop in their bat, are valuable to a contender. The Pirates needed relief for Russell Martin, and it didn’t hurt Buck has a National League background.

Buck was terrific for the Mets, but they wouldn’t have gotten anything for him if he left after the season.

The Mets must now make a first base choice between Davis and Duda. It’s not likely they’ll tender Davis a contract, so get something now. That upside the Mets promised with Davis, well, we haven’t seen it.

Duda would be cheaper, so I’m inclined to believe they’d keep him over Davis. They can’t carry both, especially with Duda not playing the outfield.

Murphy is a reliable bat and could come off the bench as a pinch-hitter, and to an American League team, he has DH potential. And, does anybody believe they’ll bring back Hawkins?

Just a few weeks ago the Mets were thinking about .500 and second place. With Harvey and Wheeler, the future looked bright.

Not so much now.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 19

Mets Making Mistake Not Hitting Juan Lagares Second

If not for Major League Baseball’s inane scheduling policies, the New York Mets should be enjoying a day off following a lengthy road trip, not playing the Minnesota Twins with a starting line-up featuring just three players – Daniel Murphy, Ike Davis and starter Dillon Gee – who were on the Opening Day roster.

LAGARES: Let's see what he can do batting second.

LAGARES: Let’s see what he can do batting second.

Considering the influx in personnel, it is impressive they are in third place and only nine games under .500.

Quite simply, scheduling the Mets in Minneapolis in April was just plain dumb, but that’s another rant later.

Such a turnaround in personnel is astonishing as evidenced by today’s line-up, the 94th different penned by Terry Collins. If that’s not a record, it should be.

It is puzzling why a run-starved team like the Mets aren’t capitalizing on Juan Lagares’ speed and bunching him with Eric Young at the top of the order. There’s stolen base and run potential there. Even with the designated hitter, batting Lagares eighth does little good.

Here’s today’s head-scratching line-up:

Eric Young, LF: One of the Mets’ primary problems has been resolved.

Daniel Murphy, 2B: Should be hitting third, a better RBI slot. His patience helps Young, but he might have greater value hitting in a RBI position.

Marlon Byrd, RF: Murphy should be dropped down to third and Byrd should be clean-up. Byrd is also hot now, so I can see Collins’ reasoning.

Ike Davis, 1B: With his soaring on-base percentage, he should be hitting leadoff. Joking. Seriously, with the rate he’s getting on base he should be hitting ahead of Byrd to maximize the latter’s RBI potential.

Andrew Brown, DH: Good he’s getting a chance to play, but I would drop him behind Wilmer Flores.

Wilmer Flores, 3B: I’d bat Flores behind Davis to maximize his RBI potential. Prior to his injury, he was averaging also a RBI per game.

Travis d’Arnaud, C: We don’t know how he’ll hit on this level, so seventh is as good a slot as any.

Juan Lagares, CF: This one is puzzling. They need to bunch the speed of Young and Lagares to generate excitement and run-scoring potential at the top of the line-up. The concern might be Lagares’ ability to work an at-bat to protect Young, but that should come with the experience of hitting second.

Omar Quintanilla, SS: This is about right. No pitcher hitting today, but in the regular line-up eighth is his place.

Dillon Gee, RHP: Could tie Matt Harvey with nine wins today.

I don’t understand Collins’ approach in determining his line-up, which means the Mets will score nine runs today. Would anybody be surprised if they did?

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos