Dec 06

No Worries, Mets Land Curtis Granderson

Curtis Granderson got what he wanted, but the New York Mets got what they needed when the outfielder agreed to a four-year, $60-million contract.

Granderson, at 32, wanted an extra year, while the Mets, desperate to not only add a power bat to their outfield, but avoid the perception of inactivity, acquiesced on the extra year.

It is the largest deal the Mets have given an outfielder since they gave a four-year, $66-million contract to Jason Bay, who flamed out to such a degree general manager Sandy Alderson bought him out of the final year.

After repeated promises they would spend this winter to reach a competitive level, the Mets could not go back on their word, even with the loss of Matt Harvey for the 2014 season.

Even with Harvey this year the Mets wouldn’t be able to add all the pieces they needed to compete for a wild card. And, they certainly wouldn’t have been able to add them all next winter.

If nothing else, the Mets needed to show their frustrated fan base they were making an effort. The perception was the Wilpons were sitting on their wallets, but this dashes that notion to a large degree.

Yes, Granderson is a high strikeouts, low on-base percentage and low average player, but his game is driving the ball for extra bases and scoring and driving in runs. This is what the Mets have been lacking.

On the plus side, Granderson can run, and while he has hit leadoff during his career, he’ll likely bat behind David Wright to offer the protection he’s missed since Carlos Beltran was with the Mets.

Granderson also is a left-handed presence the team has needed because of the inability of Ike Davis and Lucas Duda to even come close to expectations.

The Mets have resolved their outfield holes, but with the Winter Meetings set for two days in Orlando, they have a considerable amount of work to do, beginning with their starting pitching.

With Harvey out, the Mets need two starters at the back end of the rotation. The Mets also don’t know if Bobby Parnell will be ready to move back into the closer role, and after him, still need to add to their bullpen.

The Mets are still in flux as to their first baseman, and want to trade either Davis or Duda. They also want to add a back-up catcher to Travis d’Arnaud.

The Granderson signing figures to push Eric Young out of the outfield and possibly to second base, which could make Daniel Murphy available in a trade. My first thought is they might offer him to the Yankees as a replacement to losing Robinson Cano.

Dec 06

Granderson Agrees To 4-Year Deal With Mets

GRANDERSON: Talking with Mets.

The Mets have agreed to sign free agent outfielder Curtis Granderson to a four-year deal according to Joel Sherman of the NY Post.

Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports reports that the deal is worth $60 million dollars or a $15 million annual average.

The Mets will lose their second round pick, but that’s no big deal if Granderson delivers 25-30 homers a season for the Mets as they believe he will.

Sandy Alderson apparently relented and gave into Granderson’s fourth year demand which came as a surprise to me. However, Sandy did what he needed to do and gave the 32 year old Granderson what he wanted to get a deal done. If he had let him go to Orlando unsigned, I doubt he would have been a Met.

Granderson suffered a couple of freak injuries last season and was limited to just 61 games with the Yankees, batting .229/.319/.407 with seven home runs and 15 RBI in 245 plate appearances while striking out 69 times.

The newest Met is expected to play left field I would suspect, pushing Eric Young Jr. out of a starting outfield job. If the Mets move him to second base, it could signal a Daniel Murphy trade which would free up about $5 million for the Mets.

I applaud the Mets for finally taking the plunge on a significant signing. Well done…

Dec 06

What If The Mets Can’t Get Curtis Granderson?

Let’s suppose for a moment the New York Mets don’t sign Curtis Granderson. What then?

There will undoubtedly be cries of the Mets not wanting to spend and others that they don’t have the resources they claimed they had. It is hard to say which is true.

As far as outfielders go, there aren’t a lot of remaining options. We know they won’t bring back Carlos Beltran or pay through the nose for Nelson Cruz or Shin-Soo Cho.

I’ve always like Nate McLouth, but heard nothing in that regard from the Mets. There was some reported interest in Corey Hart, but that has cooled.

What are they going to do, have an encore with Rick Ankiel, Xavier Nady, Jeff Francoeur or Jason Bay?

Honestly, if they don’t get Granderson and aren’t interested in McLouth, they might be better off going with Matt den Dekker, Juan Lagares and Eric Young in their outfield.

There’s some school of thought that if the Mets can’t be competitive this year, they might just wait until next winter to spend. This idea can’t be any worse.

The Mets have been pointing to this winter as one in which they would spend and the fan base bought into that promise. To come away empty again would be destructive and only increase the sense of distrust between the Mets and their fans.

Matt Harvey’s absence this summer isn’t the issue anymore. The Mets must accept that and put a representative team on the field, one in which they can develop for the future, because there’s still the matter of selling tickets and putting a product worthy of watching on television. Currently, they need starting and bullpen help; and outfielder with pop; a shortstop; a back-up catcher; and a decision at first base.

They’ve accomplished none of that with the Winter Meetings three days away.

Even with Harvey, they wouldn’t have filled all these holes this winter. They must fill some holes now because they won’t be able to fill them all next year.

It would have been great to see the Mets compete for the wild card this year. While that likely won’t happen, there’s no reason to believe there can’t be some improvement. They won 74 games in 2013, and for all the good Harvey did, he still had 13 no-decisions.

Surely, one more victory a month could push them to 80 victories or even reach .500. It is possible with some help.

That’s why getting Granderson is important, and even if they don’t, they can’t cash in their chips. It might not be the playoffs, but there is something to play for.

 

Dec 05

Three Years Won’t Be Enough To Get Granderson

The New York Mets are serious about signing Curtis Granderson. But, will the three-year contract that has been |reported be enough?

At 32, Granderson would likely want a fourth year considering what is going on in the market. If Carlos Beltran, who is four years older than Granderson is reportedly talking with Kansas City for a three-year, $48-million contract, it stands to reason Granderson would want an additional year.

GRANDERSON: Talking with Mets.

GRANDERSON: Talking with Mets.

General manager Sandy Alderson said the Mets must adjust to a “robust,’’ market, and that would include the ability to upgrade their initial offer.

The money sounds about right, but the Mets might have to jack up the annual salary if they are adamant about three years. Otherwise, they might have to go three years plus an option, or give in on the fourth year.

Either way, Granderson is the best available outfielder in the market that won’t cripple them financially. Texas’ Nelson Cruz and Cincinnati’s Shin-Soo Cho have reportedly sought deals in excess of $90 million and five years.

The Mets, understandably because of the long-term deals with Johan Santana and Jason Bay that flamed out, not to mention Oliver Perez and Luis Castillo, want to shy away from lengthy contracts. David Wright was the lone exception.

Granderson would be a definite upgrade to the outfield, and despite his propensity for striking out, has the production numbers to offset that problem. He could play left, with Juan Lagares in center and Chris Young in left.

Presumably, Eric Young would play off the bench, or as has been suggested, move to second base if Daniel Murphy is traded. It is also possible Murphy could return to first base depending upon what happens to Ike Davis or Lucas Duda.

A deal is not imminent and Granderson is sure to talk to other suitors. The Yankees said despite their signing of Jacoby Ellsbury they would entertain brining back Granderson.

There are positives to getting Granderson, and his strikeouts differ from Davis’ because he will give something in return.

Granderson knows what it takes to play in New York, so there wouldn’t be that adjustment process. He could even keep his apartment.

Signing Granderson would answer one of the Mets’ numerous questions. They still need to add two starters; build depth in their bullpen; resolve the first base question; and add a catcher to back-up Travis d’Arnaud.

So, even if the Mets sign him, their work won’t be close to being done.

Dec 04

Mets Make Three-Year Offer To Granderson

curtis-granderson_600

METS HAVE MADE A THREE-YEAR OFFER TO GRANDERSON

According to WFAN/CBS Sports baseball insider Jon Heyman, the Mets are believed to have offered free agent outfielder Curtis Granderson a three-year deal.

Heyman also reports that Granderson is looking for a five-year deal and that the 32-year-old outfielder is seeking $17 million per year.

It’s interesting watching how this is evolving.

About an hour ago I actually posted on Twitter than if I were Granderson’s agent, I’d probably advise him to wait until Carlos Beltran signs his deal and then demand a 4-5 year deal.

As was reported earlier, the Mets were only planning to offer three years.

That an offer was actually extended, indicates that talks may be settling down for now, while Granderson’s agents get back to some of the other teams that have reached out to him. This is what all agents do. They shop offers and try to get a better one.

No word yet if the Mets have asked for a right of first refusal, or even if three years was their final offer, but these things have a way of leaking out sooner rather than later.