Oct 04

Explaining What Went Wrong For The 2012 Mets

Other than a lack of overall talent, there’s never just one reason why a team fails to win. The Mets began the season projected for the basement, with some corners speculating 100 losses.

So, at 74-88, 14 games below .500, and in fourth place, the Mets did better than expected, but in the end were still disappointing and kicked a promising season away with a dismal second half.

The Mets were 46-40 at the break, but ended the first half on a sour note by losing two of three at Citi Field to the Cubs. This coming after losing two of three to the Cubs at Wrigley Field a short time earlier.

You can’t consider yourself a serious contender when you lose consecutive series to a team that lost 100 games. You just can’t do it.

So, what went wrong?

STREAKY BAD: The Mets’ longest winning streak in the second half was four, accomplished twice. Conversely, they had five such losing streaks, including dropping six straight three times. When a team is streaky bad like that players begin to press, which is what happened in July and August.

STAYING WITH A PAT HAND: GM Sandy Alderson said several times the team had the resources to add talent if they were in contention at the trade deadline. But, that doesn’t meaning waiting until July 31. The bullpen had shown signs of breaking down in late June and early July, and there was a woeful lack of power with Ike Davis, Jason Bay and Lucas Duda doing nothing, but Alderson was content to believe things would get better and was satisfied at the break with a 46-40 record. The Mets opened the second half with two losing streaks of at least five games and by that time it was too late.

INJURIES: All teams have them and the Mets were no exception. It’s hard to win when three-fifths of your rotation goes down. First, Mike Pelfrey, then Dillon Gee and Johan Santana. The Mets simply didn’t have the replacement parts they needed, although the got more from R.A. Dickey than they could have wished for and Matt Harvey made a good first impression.

THE BULLPEN COLLAPSED AGAIN: The wasn’t bad in April, but was non-existent in the second half. The pen’s failures can be summarized by just 36 saves, and a 20-22 record in one-run games and 3-7 in extra innings. Clearly, they couldn’t slam the door late. The problem wasn’t really the closer as much as it was the bridge leading to the closer.

NO OFFENSE: The Mets had three players with 20-plus homers, but that’s not enough. The Mets went 15 straight home games in the second half where they scored three or fewer runs which lead to a minus-56 runs differential. If Davis had any kind of a first half he might have finished with 40. David Wright couldn’t carry the team from July on and one wonders if he’ll be a 30-homer player again. The Mets received very little from Bay, Duda, Josh Thole and Andres Torres. Who would have thought Scott Hairston would lead the outfield with 20 homers?

 

Sep 27

Mets Matters: The Home Season Finale Today

There’s always a twinge of sadness prior to the last home game of the season. It represents finality and dreams lost.
There was little optimism coming out of spring training, but the Mets created interest, relevancy and excitement for the better part of three months. More importantly, they created optimism for a fan base that had none.
I don’t know why, but the off button was hit in the last series of the first half when they lost two of three to the Cubs, including getting pasted that last Sunday. Something just happened that was more than injuries to Dillon Gee and Johan Santana. It was as if a cloud of listlessness consumed them.
Sandy Alderson rattled off a bunch of numbers the other night. The one that was most important to me was pitches faced per at-bat. The Mets were no longer patient, no longer hitting with two outs, no longer using the whole field. They were consumed, top to bottom, with poor fundamentals.
Then the starting pitching became spotty for awhile and the bullpen imploded. As you watched July burn into August you could see on a daily basis the season slipping away. The low point? Perhaps that extra inning loss at Washington when they came from behind only to lose two leads late. By the time of the 16-1 Philly debacle, the competitive part of the season was long gone.
Once they dipped a couple of games below .500 I didn’t think they could recover. And, doing nothing at the trade deadline was another definite sign. Alderson wanted to wait and see, and what he saw was a team in decline. By then, it was too late.
The rest has been hell to watch, and I don’t need any statistics to know I was watching bad baseball. Really bad baseball.
Well, there are six games on the road after today, and it’s for Mets junkies only, much like the second half.
The Mets had a feel-good moment last night with a strong effort from Jeremy Hefner, who gave up seven runs in his previous outing. At least he leaves this season with a better taste in his mouth.
David Wright has the club hit record and today R.A. Dickey goes for 20. Wright, who had a great first half struggled in the second and is righting himself before winter. Dickey, except for a string of a few starts has been the most consistent player the team has had.
We’ll be watching today rooting for Dickey, but wondering how aggressive the Mets will be in bringing them back. If the Mets had a sense of theatre, they’d announce extensions for both today.
They won’t.
Jul 07

Mets Frustrating Again; Johan Santana Rocked

Didn’t we just see this movie?

Yeah, I remember. They beat the Dodgers three of four, then lose two of three at Chicago. If the Mets are as good as they claim they want to be, they can’t lose to teams like the Cubs. Championship caliber teams must beat up on teams with losing records.

This is something they must improve upon in the second half.

I am wondering a bit about Johan Santana, who was rocked with another big inning. Santana had been keeping trouble to a minimum, and that’s what he must do.

Jul 04

Jon Niese: One Of The Untouchable Mets

Sometimes it is better to hold a pat hand, which is what the Mets have done with Jonathan Niese over the past few years. More than a few times we heard Niese’s name mentioned in a possible trade.

NIESE: Untouchable (AP)

Whom the Mets would have received in return would not have lifted them from their 2007-2011 funk. At least, not as much as Niese is lifting them now. He’s 7-3 after last night’s 11-1 rout of the Phillies.

The players the Mets might have received could have given them a temporary spark, but they were in need of a deep rebuilding with their pitching and that begins with a stud left-hander, and Niese certainly fits that mold.

Niese was dominant last night with all his pitches, working quickly and staying ahead in the count. Give him a few runs and he’s golden. Last night he had more than he needed.

Niese is a major reason why the Mets, if the season ended today, would be in the playoffs. There’s nobody that could have predicted. Nobody.

At one time the Mets were eight games over .500 and poised to go on a roll. Instead, they faltered and threatened to go below .500. However, this has been a resilient team – perhaps its best attribute and they are seven over with two more games against the Phillies and three against the Cubs. Ten over by the break is very possible.

The Mets are doing what they should be doing against the reeling Phillies, and that is to beat up on them. When facing a down team go for the throat. While they are hurting, the Phillies still have that strong rotation and Ryan Howard due back. The season is not over for them. Other teams have made up more ground in less time, so putting as much space between them is essential for the Mets.

 

Jun 26

Terry Collins Saw It Coming; Calls Mets “Flat”

Terry Collins has been around the block more than a few times. He can see things others can’t and yesterday sensed a lack of energy from the Mets. Getting into Chicago at 4 a.m., after their adrenalin-sapping series with the Yankees can do that to a team.

WOOD: Mows down Mets (AP)

Offensively, Ike Davis’ two-out homer in the ninth averted a shutout. They couldn’t touch Travis Wood. Defensively, David Wright committed a crucial error that opened the door to a four-run Cubs seventh.

There was nothing good about the night.

“We were a little flat,” Collins said. “They’re human beings and the adrenaline knock out for a while, and the fact that they got about probably five or six hours of sleep didn’t help either.”

It was only one game, but how the Mets respond the rest of the series will be important. Contending teams, which the Mets now consider themselves, must be able to beat up on losing teams and the Cubs are MLB’s worst, now 23 games under .500.

ON DECK: Parnell gets closer job … again.