Jan 27

How Mets Answered Off-Season Questions

The New York Mets faced a myriad of questions entering the off-season. Now, with spring training staring us in the face. let’s see how have they answered them.

REBUILDING THE ROTATION

With Matt Harvey lost for the season following Tommy John surgery, the Mets needed to add two starters because they had no assurances of help from their minor league system that includes Noah Syndergaard, Rafael Montero and Jacob deGrom.

Bartolo Colon was signed to a two-year contract, theoretically to fill the void this season and in 2015 if there was a problem in Harvey’s rehab.

Within the past two weeks they signed John Lannan and Daisuke Matsuzaka, which should give them the promise of at least five innings from the fifth starter.

Colon is an upgrade over Aaron Harang, and if Matsuzaka pitches as he did in his final three starts last season, he will keep things in order until the prospects arrive.

Conclusion: They are better now than after the season, but not good enough to make them better than a .500 team without some help.

BOLSTERING THE BULLPEN

With Bobby Parnell recovering from neck surgery, the Mets’ Plan B is to make Vic Black the closer.

The Mets will bring back most of their 2013 bullpen, but there won’t be enough arms in camp to create widespread competition.

Conclusion: Things would be better if the Mets could depend on Parnell’s status, but the bullpen heading into spring training is no better than last year’s.

SETTLING ON A FIRST BASEMAN

Most Mets fans said the team should have done this last July and cut ties with Ike Davis. Unable to trade him – and initially showing signs of leaning toward Lucas Duda – it appears the Mets are back to square one by giving Davis another chance.

The Mets’ outward efforts to deal Davis only decreased his value. Duda doesn’t have much trade value, either. Neither does Wilmer Flores, who won’t be given a chance to compete for the first base job.

Conclusion: What was a season-long distraction lasted through the winter and will greet us in Port St. Lucie.

ADDRESSING SHORTSTOP

Acquiring a shortstop was a top priority during the winter, but the Mets were never in it for Jhonny Peralta and Stephen Drew is well out of their price range.

Prior to the Winter Meetings, GM Sandy Alderson suggested Ruben Tejada would get another chance. The Mets also brought back Omar Quintanilla as Tejada’s back-up.

Conclusion: Instead of upgrading, the Mets are reduced to hoping for Tejada to play better than he had ever been before.

ADDING POWER TO THE OUTFIELD

Curtis Granderson was signed to a four-year contract and Chris Young was given a one-year deal. Granderson is coming off an injury prone, non-productive year.

Granderson is young enough to give the Mets hope he can bounce back, although nobody expects him to duplicate his Yankee Stadium numbers at Citi Field.

Conversely, Young is several years removed from his best seasons. The Mets are hoping for lightning in a bottle from him.

Conclusion: A productive Granderson will upgrade the offense, improve the outfield and protect David Wright in the batting order. No guarantees, however.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Oct 18

Alderson is front runner for Mets GM job

The Mets have a second interview scheduled this week for Sandy Alderson, who is the only candidate so far with a second interview planned. He is the front runner, and arguably the name with the most potential impact.

The Mets are asking about Texas’ Jon Daniels, who is a hot property, but Alderson has done it consistently and I believe would bring the highest degree of respectability to the organization. What the Mets need now is a fresh start, a sign of legitimate change and Alderson provides that variable.

The Mets have said they’d like to wrap this up by the start of the World Series. After acting decisively right after the conclusion of the season we are closing in on three weeks. Other teams have already hired quality managers and the Mets need to do the same before the end of the month.

They need to show they have a plan in place and are heading in a positive direction to show their season ticket holders before renewals and whatever free agents they might have on their radar.

Jan 14

Jan. 14.10: Beltran undergoes surgery …. out 12 weeks.

BELTRAN: Out 12 weeks.

BELTRAN: Out 12 weeks.

Twelve weeks is roughly the beginning of the start of the season. It will also be the time when Carlos Beltran starts working out. Mid-April at best when he starts to play. The Mets announced late last night Beltran’s knee has gotten worse, he underwent surgery and it will be at least 12 weeks before he assumes baseball duties. Beltran had the surgery in Colorado by his own physician.

The Mets statement read: “Carlos Beltran had worsening of osteoarthritis of the right knee during the offseason. He had not been experiencing pain following the conclusion of the season and into his early offseason conditioning. The symptoms returned to the point where pre-spring training conditioning became too painful. He elected to undergo arthroscopic clean out of the arthritic area of his knee by Beltran”s personal physician Dr. Richard Steadman today in Colorado. He is anticipated to return to baseball activities in 12 weeks.”

The statement did not answer the following questions:

1) If Beltran’s knee was so bad why wasn’t surgery performed earlier?

2) Did Beltran apprise the Mets of his condition? If so, when?

3) If so, why was there a delay in surgery?

4) If Beltran did not inform the Mets of his condition, then why not?

5) Why does this stuff only seem to happen with the Mets?

Beltran suffered a bone bruise last June and was limited to only 81 games.

Believe me, fingers are going to be pointed in the coming days. This is inexcusable. If Beltran’s condition was a deterioration, then it was progressive and something should have been done earlier because somebody should have known. As an injured player, the Mets should at all times be aware of his progress.

This nonsense about “should be ready for spring training,” is nuts to me. They’ve got to examine him on a regular basis, and if Beltran was progressive, he shouldn’t been more diligent in informing his employer about his condition.

Neither Beltran nor the Mets look too sharp in this. So much for all the changes.

NOTE: Please vote in the new poll on who should take the hit for this.