Jul 02

Resilient Mets Show Something; Josh Satin And Andrew Brown Star

No, Matt Harvey doesn’t get a partial credit for a win last night, but even so it was fun to watch the New York Mets turn aggravation to something to shout about.

They left 20 runners on base for the second time this season, but nonetheless came from behind twice to beat Arizona, 5-4 in 13 innings, before another sparse crowd at Citi Field.

BROWN: Coming through. (AP)

BROWN: Coming through. (AP)

`If you’re going to be out there that long you might as well win the game,’’ manager Terry Collins told reporters. “We were out of pitching, I can tell you that.’’

Actually, the Mets were out of everything, even using Anthony Recker as a pinch-hitter.

The Mets won largely from the contributions of three players – Josh Satin, Andrew Brown and Omar Quintanilla – and reliever David Aardsma, who weren’t on the Opening Day roster.

Factoring prominently was Satin, whom the Mets had to place on their 40-man roster to promote him when Ike Davis was finally sent down to Triple-A Las Vegas.

Satin has been on a tear, batting .444 (12-for-27, including back-to-back three-hit games) in the last seven games.

Not to dump on Davis, but there’s no rush to bring him back with how Satin is playing.

“Josh deserves some at-bats,’’ Collins said of Satin’s increased playing time. “He’s getting some big hits. It doesn’t matter if they’re left-handed or right-handed. He’s getting big hits for us.

“I’ll tell you what: Every team has somebody that surprises you and saves you. And right now, he’s our savior `cause this guy has come up and filled a big hole for us.’’

Savior is a bit much, but he is playing well.

Down 3-0, the Mets scored single runs in the seventh, eighth and ninth innings, with Satin driving home Marlon Byrd to force extra innings.

Met killer Cody Ross homered to give Arizona a 4-3 lead, and you could imagine TV sets across the tri-state area turning off. After all, it was past midnight.

But with one out, Satin doubled to the opposite field – something we rarely see from Davis. Instead of trying to strike him out for a fourth time, the Diamondbacks intentionally walked John Buck. Enter Harvey, who bunted the runners to second and third. Quintanilla was intentionally walked to load the bases, and Brown singled to erase the sour taste of the weekend.

Quintanilla had three more hits and walked twice; Brown also delivered a sacrifice; and Aardsma pitched two innings for the win. It was the seventh time this year the Mets won in walk-off fashion.

“Walking a team off at the end – there’s no greater feeling,’’ said Satin, who unlike Harvey, is not dating a supermodel.

Even so, he had a point.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 22

Mets Outbid For Liriano And Ross

It has come to this, the Pittsburgh Pirates and Arizona Diamondbacks have outbid the Mets.

The now pitching-deficient and long-time outfield void Mets had their sights on left-hander Francisco Liriano and outfielder Cody Ross, but lost them to the Pirates and Diamondbacks, respectively, who offered multi-year deals they wouldn’t have dreamt of giving.

The Pirates, who were a feel-good story for much of the season before fading late because of their pitching, gave Liriano a two-year, $14-million deal.

Ross, who hit 22 homers with 81 RBI last year for Boston, was given a three-year, $26-million contract.

The Mets are interested in retaining outfielder Scott Hairston, but are reluctant to go longer than two years or more than $2 million, so there’s no chance they could have signed Ross.

As far as Liriano, they could have easily signed him with the money they saved by not bringing back R.A. Dickey.

But, neither happened, and signing Hairston probably won’t happen, either.

Nov 05

Cody Ross To The Mets? Don’t Bet On It.

According to Mike Puma of the New York Post, The Mets could target free agent OF Cody Ross this winter.

“The Mets have a glaring need for outfield help”, Puma points out, and “multiple baseball officials yesterday pointed to Cody Ross as a possible free-agent target for the team.”

The righthanded hitting Ross batted .267/.326/.481 with 22 home runs and 81 RBI in 476 at-bats for the Red Sox this season. He was particularly effective against lefthanded pitching against whom he batted .295/.373/.636/1.010.

Ross, 32, signed a one-year deal with Boston last season for $3 million dollars.

While the Mets had shown interest in Ross last season, when he was coming off a poor .240 campaign with the San Francisco Giants. I simply can’t see that level of interest now when he will be much more costly and is lobbying for a 3-year deal, although I’m betting he won’t get more than two years guaranteed. Click to view odds. If Ross does get a third year it most likely will come in the form of a vesting or team option.

They way things stand now, the New York Mets can’t even afford to bring back Scott Hairston who proved to be the only productive player in their outfield. It’s a shame that a team that plays its game in the sports mecca of the world, New York City, are not only going to let an outfielder like Scott Hairston walk, but that they are still grappling with extending their face of the franchise David Wright and their ace R.A. Dickey as we speak.  How palling and frustrating is that?

Anyway, getting back to Cody Ross, I just don’t see how he can fit into the team’s budget unless a significant player was traded to make room for him on the payroll.

It’s common knowledge that the Mets have only about $10 million or less to spend this offseason which makes it difficult to see how they can net someone like Ross who will cost in upwards of $5-6 million per season and that he’s looking for a multi year deal.

Then there’s the other question of whether Ross would even choose to play for the Mets over the 6-7 other teams who are said to be very interested in him including the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies and Atlanta Braves.

I think this is a great rumor to entertain Mets fans, Ross would certainly fit in very nicely. But unfortunately it’s a rumor that has no legs.

Nov 03

The market is open.

The free-agent market is open for business and the Mets’ exclusive window for Jose Reyes has slammed shut without an overture from GM Sandy Alderson, which isn’t good business.

Alderson did not meet with Reyes, which is surprising. Why not take the guy and his wife out to dinner and tell him they would like to keep him. If this is a negotiating ploy, I don’t see it.

Reyes’ camp reportedly is not interested in a home team discount, so the interpretation is this will be a cool parting.

The Mets’ have their reservations on Reyes’ health, which is obvious, and do not want to set the market for their shortstop. I maintain they want to see how much the market will shrink to see if Reyes will come back to them as Johan Santana did several years ago.

The Red Sox, Yankees and Cubs won’t be players, leaving San Francisco, the Angels, Philadelphia if it doesn’t sign Jimmy Rollins, and NL East Rivals Washington and Miami.

If I were Alderson, I’d be more concerned about Miami and the Nationals than I would Philadelphia. With or without Rollins, and even without Ryan Howard at the start of the season, the Phillies are better than the Mets. You can throw a blanket over the Mets, Miami and Washington.

One must ascertain from their stance on Reyes that Alderson doesn’t consider the Mets to be as close to contention as their flirtation with .500 would indicate. If he truly believed the Mets were close, even for a wild-card, it would seem they would be more aggressive in retaining Reyes.

According to a variety of sources, the following is the list of the free-agents on the market (ages in parenthesis):

Catchers

Rod Barajas (36) – Type B
Josh Bard (34)
Henry Blanco (40)
Ramon Castro (36)
Ryan Doumit (31) – Type B
Jake Fox (29)
Ramon Hernandez (36) – Type A
Rob Johnson (28)
Jason Kendall (38)
Gerald Laird (32)
Jose Molina (36) – Type B
Dioner Navarro (28)
Ivan Rodriguez (40)
Brian Schneider (35)
Kelly Shoppach (32)
Chris Snyder (31) – Type B
J.R. Towles (28)
Matt Treanor (36)
Jason Varitek (40) – Type B

First basemen
Russell Branyan (36)
Jorge Cantu (30)
Michael Cuddyer (33) – Type A
Prince Fielder (28) – Type A
Ross Gload (36)
Brad Hawpe (33)
Casey Kotchman (29)
Mark Kotsay (36)
Derrek Lee (36) – Type B
Xavier Nady (33)
Lyle Overbay (35)
Carlos Pena (34) – Type B
Albert Pujols (32) – Type A

Second basemen
Clint Barmes (33) – Type B
Willie Bloomquist (34)
Orlando Cabrera (37)
Jamey Carroll (37)
Alex Cora (36)
Craig Counsell (41)
Mark Ellis (35) – Type B
Jerry Hairston Jr. (36)
Bill Hall (32)
Aaron Hill (30) – Type B
Kelly Johnson (30) – Type A
Adam Kennedy (36)
Felipe Lopez (32)
Jose Lopez (28)
Aaron Miles (35)
Nick Punto (34)
Drew Sutton (29)

Shortstops
Clint Barmes (33) – Type B
Yuniesky Betancourt (30) – Type B
Orlando Cabrera (37)
Jamey Carroll (37)
Ronny Cedeno (29)
Craig Counsell (41)
Rafael Furcal (34) – Type B
Alex Gonzalez (34) – Type B
Jerry Hairston Jr. (36)
Cesar Izturis (32)
Nick Punto (34)
Edgar Renteria (35)
Jose Reyes (29) – Type A
Luis Rodriguez (32)
Jimmy Rollins (33) – Type A
Ramon Santiago (32)
Jack Wilson (34)

Third basemen
Wilson Betemit (30) – Type B
Casey Blake (38)
Jorge Cantu (30)
Eric Chavez (34)
Craig Counsell (41)
Mark DeRosa (37)
Greg Dobbs (33)
Jerry Hairston Jr. (36)
Kevin Kouzmanoff (30)
Andy LaRoche (28)
Felipe Lopez (32)
Jose Lopez (28)
Nick Punto (34)
Aramis Ramirez (34) – Type B
Omar Vizquel (45)

Left fielders
Travis Buck (28)
Pat Burrell (35) – Type B
Johnny Damon (37)
Mark DeRosa (37)
Jake Fox (29)
Jay Gibbons (35)
Jonny Gomes (31)
Carlos Guillen (36)
Scott Hairston (32)
Bill Hall (32)
Willie Harris (34)
Raul Ibanez (40) – Type B
Conor Jackson (30)
Reed Johnson (35)
Fred Lewis (31)
Ryan Ludwick (33) – Type B
Jason Michaels (36)
Laynce Nix (31)
Wily Mo Pena (30)
Felix Pie (27)
Juan Pierre (34) – Type B
Marcus Thames (35)
Josh Willingham (33) – Type A

Center fielders
Rick Ankiel (32)
Willie Bloomquist (34)
Mike Cameron (39)
Endy Chavez (34)
Coco Crisp (32)
David DeJesus (32) – Type B
Scott Hairston (32)
Andruw Jones (35)
Nate McLouth (30)
Corey Patterson (32)
Cody Ross (31) – Type B
Grady Sizemore (29)
Dewayne Wise (34)

Right fielders
Carlos Beltran (35) – Type A, cannot be offered arbitration
Willie Bloomquist (34)
Milton Bradley (34)
Michael Cuddyer (33) – Type A
David DeJesus (32) – Type B
J.D. Drew (36)
Kosuke Fukudome (35)
Willie Harris (34)
Brad Hawpe (33)
Jason Kubel (29) – Type B
Ryan Ludwick (33) – Type B
Xavier Nady (33)
Magglio Ordonez (38) – Type B
Cody Ross (31) – Type B
Josh Willingham (33) – Type A

Designated hitters
Milton Bradley (34)
Johnny Damon (37)
Vladimir Guerrero (37) – Type B
Carlos Guillen (36)
David Ortiz (36) – Type A
Jason Kubel (29) – Type B
Hideki Matsui (38)
Wily Mo Pena (30)
Jorge Posada (40)
Jim Thome (41)

Starting pitchers
Erik Bedard (33)
Mark Buehrle (33) – Type B
Chris Capuano (33)
Bruce Chen (35) – Type B
Bartolo Colon (39)
Aaron Cook (33)
Kyle Davies (28)
Doug Davis (36)
Zach Duke (29)
Jeff Francis (30)
Armando Galarraga (30)
Freddy Garcia (36) – Type B
Jon Garland (32)
Aaron Harang (34) – Type B
Rich Harden (30)
Livan Hernandez (37)
Hisashi Iwakuma (31)
Edwin Jackson (28) – Type B
Hiroki Kuroda (37) – Type B
Rodrigo Lopez (36)
Paul Maholm (30)
Jason Marquis (33)
Kevin Millwood (37)
Sergio Mitre (31)
Roy Oswalt (34) – Type A
Brad Penny (34)
Joel Pineiro (33)
Mitch Talbot (28)
Javier Vazquez (35)
Tsuyoshi Wada (31)
Tim Wakefield (45)
Chien-Ming Wang (32)
Brandon Webb (33)
Dontrelle Willis (30)
C.J. Wilson (31) – Type A
Chris Young (33)

Closers
Heath Bell (34) – Type A
Jonathan Broxton (28)
Matt Capps (28) – Type A
Francisco Cordero (37) – Type A
Frank Francisco (32) – Type B
Ryan Madson (31) – Type A
Joe Nathan (37)
Jonathan Papelbon (31) – Type A
Jon Rauch (33) – Type B
Francisco Rodriguez (30) – Type A

Right-handed relievers
David Aardsma (29)
Jeremy Accardo (30)
Luis Ayala (34)
Danys Baez (34)
Miguel Batista (41)
Shawn Camp (36) – Type B
Todd Coffey (31)
Juan Cruz (31)
Octavio Dotel (38) – Type A
Chad Durbin (34)
Jeff Fulchino (32)
Juan Gutierrez (28)
LaTroy Hawkins (37)
Aaron Heilman (33)
Ryota Igarashi (33)
Jason Isringhausen (39)
Brad Lidge (35) – Type B
Scott Linebrink (35)
Mike MacDougal (35)
Guillermo Mota (38)
Pat Neshek (31)
Ramon Ortiz (39)
Vicente Padilla (34)
Tony Pena (30)
Chad Qualls (33)
Jon Rauch (33) – Type B
Fernando Rodney (35)
Takashi Saito (42) – Type A
Dan Wheeler (34) – Type B
Kerry Wood (35) – Type B
Jamey Wright (37)
Michael Wuertz (33)
Joel Zumaya (27)

Left-handed relievers
Mike Gonzalez (34)
John Grabow (33)
Damaso Marte (37)
Trever Miller (39)
Darren Oliver (41) – Type A
Arthur Rhodes (41) – Type B
J.C. Romero (36)
George Sherrill (35)
Brian Tallet (34)

 

Jun 07

Takahashi needs shorter leash

Hisanori Takahashi will get another chance partly because he deserves it, but also because the Mets don’t have much choice.

TAKAHASHI: Raked again.

Takahashi has started four games; two sparkling and two stinkers. What the Mets have learned is when the unraveling starts it comes quickly, and trouble usually comes around the fifth and sixth innings.

He began to tire at this time against the Yankees and Phillies, and yesterday. However, he lost it early against the Padres, when he never had command.

The memory of the Yankees and Phillies starts, plus how strong he was until the Cody Ross homer yesterday, is what will keep him in the rotation for now.

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