Aug 01

Mets Matters: Rosario Makes Good First Impression With Fan Tweet

I recently took a shot at Amed Rosario about Twitter, but this time he must be praised for his open letter to Mets fans on Twitter:

mets matters“Dear Mets fans,

We’ve grown and made it together! To God be ALL the glory. I’m grateful to share this moment with ALL of you, specially #Mets fans who have showered me with support. Things won’t always be perfect, but expect me to give you ALL of me, each and every day. Lets create long lasting memories in out CITI.

The kid from Los Mameyes,

Amed’’

Simply terrific. I’ve seen players write letters to fans when they leave a team, but never before his first game. A tremendous first impression.

Rosario will wear No. 1.

Joining Rosario is pitcher Chasen Bradford. To make room, Matt Reynolds was optioned and, of course, Addison Reed was traded to Boston.

Rosario was the Mets No. 1 prospect according to Baseball America at the beginning of the season and was currently ranked as the second-best prospect in all of baseball by MLB.com in their mid-season rankings. He was hitting.328 (129-393) with 19 doubles, seven triples, seven home runs, 58 RBI 19 stolen bases, and 66 runs scored in 94 games at Triple A Las Vegas.

He is among the PCL leaders in hits (129, second), stolen bases (19, tied for third), triples (seven, tied for ninth) and batting average (.328, 10th). He had two 17-game hitting streaks with the 51s.

Rosario was signed by the Mets in 2012 out of the Dominican Republic. He was selected to the mid-season Pacific Coast League All-Star team as the starting shortstop, and has participated in the last two Futures Game at the All-Star Game.

REYES OUT: Shortstop Jose Reyes isn’t in tonight’s lineup, partly because of Rosario and partly because of a bruised left forearm from getting hit by a pitch Sunday in Seattle.

X-Rays were negative and it is hoped he can play tonight as a pinch-hitter.

The Mets will send Reyes’ X-ray results to New York for further evaluation.

Reyes is batting .226 with nine home runs and 13 stolen bases in 100 games.

TONIGHT’S LINEUP

Michael Conforto – CF: Is batting .333 with four homers and 33 RBI with RISP. … Is tied with Bryce Harper, Giancarlo Stanton, J.D. Martinez and Justin Smoak for the most homers since the break with seven.

Asdrubal Cabrera – 3B: Is batting .297 with six RBI and 12 runs scored since break. … Has 17 RBI with RISP.

Yoenis Cespedes – LF: Is hitting .278 with 15 RBI with RISP. … Has one homer in last 110 at-bats.

Jay Bruce – RF: Is hitting .307 with nine homers and 48 RBI with RISP. … Has reached base in 85 of 97 games played.

Neil Walker – 2B: Is hitting .392 with 24 RBI with RISP. … Lifetime .331 hitter vs. Rockies.

Wilmer Flores – 1B: Is hitting .204 with 19 RBI with RISP. … Has four homers and seven RBI in last 11 games.

Amed Rosario – SS: Makes ML debut after hitting .328 at Las Vegas. Will wear uniform No. 1.

Travis d’Arnaud – C: Is hitting .302 with six extra-base hits and 25 with RISP. … All of his nine homers have been hit on the road.

Steven Matz – LHP: Has lost three straight decisions, and has a 14.18 ERA in last four starts.

Dec 03

So Far, Harvey Buying Into Mets’ Plans

Since it’s only December, everything must be taken at face value when it comes to Matt Harvey. You want to take him at his word, but I wouldn’t be me if I weren’t skeptical after hearing him say at this afternoon’s press conference he was on board with the Mets’ decision to limit his innings this summer.

HARVEY: It is early.

HARVEY: It is early.

Harvey bucked the Mets before, so it wouldn’t be a surprise if he did again.

GM Sandy Alderson said there’s a soft cap on Harvey, which is to say there’s no definitive plan. I prefer something more concrete. Even Harvey conceded 200 innings won’t happen, nor should it 17 months after surgery.

“You know what? I’m going to be happy to throw an entire year,’’ Harvey told reporters at Citi Field. “Whatever they decide, it’s in the best interests of both the team and me moving forward. I can’t wait to throw every five days and just be healthy for a full season.

“Looking forward, if you were to map out a whole season, you’re going to have to figure out some changes throughout the year in order to get to a certain point. I mean, if you make 33 starts and seven innings a start, obviously doing the math that’s over what I’m probably going to throw.’’

That’s logic talking, not the usual emotions we get from him. Alderson said the plan is to limit Harvey during the season, but have no restrictions should the Mets reach the playoffs. However, if the Mets are eliminated early, bet on Harvey being further cut.

What the Mets pledge to do is not just yank the plug on him the way Washington did Stephen Strasburg in 2012.

Harvey has been throwing on flat ground six days a week at Citi Field and plans to report to spring training Feb. 1 and face hitters right away.

All this is optimistic, but if Harvey buys into the Mets’ plans this should go smoothly.

One can only hope.

Nov 18

Alderson Defends Moving In Fences

We knew the New York Mets were moving in the fences. This afternoon we learned by how much. Common sense dictates moving in the fences benefits the hitters more than the pitchers, but speaking like any politician you’ve ever heard, GM Sandy Alderson says that’s not the case.

“These modifications are a refinement of previous changes made to the Citi Field fences and continue to be fair to both pitchers and hitters,’’ Alderson said. “A lot of analysis went into this decision. We believe these modifications will increase the number of home runs without adversely affecting our pitchers.’’

Of course, that’s impossible.

In its first three seasons, Citi Field measured 415 feet at its deepest point in right-center. In the last three years the wall was 390 feet. It will now be 380 feet.

Had the Mets played with these dimensions last season, they would have hit an additional 17 home runs while the opposition would have hit 10 more.

It is impossible to project those numbers because it doesn’t into account: 1) wind conditions, and 2) the game situation, which would dictate how hitters are pitched.

Making such a declaration means every fly ball hit last year at Citi Field would have to be analyzed, and quite frankly I don’t believe that was done.

Alderson said the goals in moving in the fences were two-fold: 1) making the more Mets more competitive at home, and 2) increasing offense, which he says increases the entertainment value of the Citi Field experience.

Then again, if the altered fences make the Mets more competitive, it stands to reason the opponents would also benefit. And, it’s not guaranteed the Mets will score most of those additional runs.

The Mets were out-homered by the opposition 71-59 last year at Citi Field. That’s 12 more. Now, if the Mets would have hit 17 more, that’s only a net of five more home runs. That’s less than one a month.

The bottom line is there’s no guarantee the both teams would benefit equally to the fences being moved in. However, one can only surmise if the opposition was 12 homers better than the Mets last season, they enter this year 12 homers better.

Also not being taken into consideration is that the Mets are building their team on young pitching. Why make things harder for them?

Nov 08

Mets Hope Shortening Outfield Walls at Citi Will Prove Succesful

Citi-Field-New-Fences-2014

For the second time since moving into their new home in 2009, the New York Mets will be moving the outfield walls at Citi Field, reportedly bringing the right field wall closer to home plate, in an effort to help boost their overall homerun production, particularly power hitters such as David Wright and Curtis Granderson.

Following the 2011 MLB season, the Mets made significant changes to the ballpark dimensions at Citi Field, bringing in the left field wall by as much as 13 feet and right center field by 17 feet, and lowering the wall height to eight feet throughout the outfield.

In 2012, the first season played in their modified home, the Mets’ homerun production jumped from 108, 26th overall in the majors, to 139, with the biggest beneficiary being lefty first baseman Ike Davis, who hit a career-high 32 dingers to lead the team.

Although the Mets, who are pegged as 40/1 longshots to win the 2015 World Series in MLB Betting at sportsbooks available through www.bettingsports.com, have yet to comment on any planned modifications to the ball park, recently published aerial pics indicate that significant work on the outfield wall is already underway with the primary focus on the right center field area.

The upcoming changes are expected to be formally unveiled by the ball club in late November, and should provide a boost to the Mets’ power production, once again among the lowest in MLB in 2014, 20th overall with just 125 total. But shortening the porch also means changes are likely in store for the Mets’ pitching staff.

Veteran hurler Bartolo Colon and right hander Dillon Gee, who gave up 18 home runs in 22 appearances for the Mets this season will likely be moving on due to their susceptibility to give up long fly balls, many of which would carry as homers in the newly modified park. But with young hurlers Zack Wheeler and Matt Harvey, both ground ball pitchers, looking ready to take on bigger roles in Queens, the timing could not be better for the Mets.

New York is not the only ball club that has modified its ballpark’s dimensions in recent years in an effort to increase power production.

The Seattle Mariners significantly shortened the left field wall at Safeco Field prior to the 2013 MLB season, from 390 feet to 378 feet, while the right field fence was shortened by 11 feet as part of a major renovation at the San Diego Padres’ Petco Park.

The moves produced immediate dividends for both west coast clubs with the Padres jumping from a MLB third-worst 121 dingers in 2012 to 146 in 2013, while the M’s jumped from a middling 149 long balls in 2012 to 188, second best in the majors in 2013.

Oct 11

Moving Fences In Not A Good Move

If we were playing one of those games where you match a word to an action, you might choose “embarrassing,’’ for the Mets’ decision to change the dimensions for the third time since Citi Field opened in 2009.

Three times in six years is a clear indication this team doesn’t have a grasp as to its desired identity.

When Citi Field opened, the Mets wanted to build on pitching, defense and speed. Even so, their first signing was Jason Bay, who turned into an $80 million bust.

When David Wright was injured, Bay floundered and Ike Davis failed to hit management moved in the fences. Bay and Davis are gone, Wright is still injured and last year’s signing Curtis Granderson came up with a mediocre year, they are moving the fences in again.

That seems counterproductive considering the Mets finally have some good, young pitching, and there’s the speedy Juan Lagares in center field. The Mets don’t have significant power outside of Lucas Duda, but there’s potential with Travis d’Arnaud.

The Mets have some speed, but traditionally lack patience and ability to hit in the clutch. Those two attributes are more important than pure power.

However, this doesn’t mean home runs can’t be hit in Citi Field. There were 130 homers hit there last season, of which 59 were hit by the Mets and 71 by the opposition.

Assuming a healthy Wright, a full season from Duda, and improvement from Granderson, d’Arnaud and Wilmer Flores, it is reasonable to expect that gap to close. And, the Mets are expecting Matt Harvey’s return and the continued development from Zack Wheeler and Jacob deGrom.

The opposition also gets to hit, so whatever advantage gained by the Mets’ offense is neutralized by what it takes from their pitching. Moving in the fences is designed to jack up the home run numbers, but in the end that’s not what gets a team into October.