Jan 02

From Wright To Alderson To Davis, Mets’ 2013 Resolutions

With the beginning of the year for making plans for improvement, let’s take a look at some of the resolutions the Mets should be making today.

THE WILPONS: You are the proud owners of a major league baseball team worth close to a billion dollars – that includes Citi Field and SNY – so act like it. With attendance steadily declining along with the yearly win total, the Wilpons should resolve to start spending to upgrade their team of sell it. Enough is enough. Start writing checks to clean up this mess.

WRIGHT: Just ease up when it gets tough. (AP)

SANDY ALDERSON: You were brought in to straighten out the Mets’ financial problems. Now it is time to bring in the talent to make this team competitive. You did it in Oakland and San Diego, now comes your biggest challenge. Reportedly, Alderson has been given a bigger budget, now don’t treat it like it is your money.

TERRY COLLINS: You were brought in change the culture, but that hasn’t been the case. Collins has been a little spotty in the accountability department and that has to change. He must resolve to kick some butt when it comes lapses in concentration, thrown-away at-bats and poor pitch selection from his pitchers. The culture can’t change if Collins doesn’t demand more from his players.

DAVID WRIGHT: OK, you’re getting your long term commitment and enough money to last 100 lifetimes. There have been too many times when Wright takes it upon himself to carry the Mets on his shoulders when the team slides. When things are going to hell for the Mets, Wright needs to resolve to shorten his swing, shrink his strike zone and go the opposite way. Wright must realize he’s little help to the Mets when he’s trying to hit a five-run homer.

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Dec 11

Mets Should Be More Active Hawking Tickets For 2013

First of all, this is not a plug to buy 2013 Mets tickets. It is simply something I am wondering about: Why aren’t the Mets doing more to plug tickets for this season?

You can buy them at Mets.com, and I suppose you might see them advertised on SNY – but that’s more a house ad – but other than that I don’t see much plugging and stumping for next summer.

Why?

Other than the obvious, that advertising costs money, there’s not a good reason, especially this time of season, when tickets should be finding their way under the tree.

In all probability, a baseball fan is a sports fan, but I haven’t seen any commercials during the Giants, Jets, Knicks or Nets. If I missed one, I am sorry, but overall I am surprised at the lack of stumping.

One thing the Mets used to do was a winter caravan, where players made appearances throughout the tri-state area. You don’t see that anymore. It was replaced by one big event in Manhattan prior to Christmas at the library, but you don’t see that, either.

Why?

Enough players live in the area, or could be flown in, to make it work. The Mets should be making us think about baseball now, not just the week prior to spring training.

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Nov 27

Mets Make Wright An Offer He Can Refuse

Multiple news agencies report the Mets finally have an offer on the table for David Wright, one that will likely be rejected. The numbers are $100 million over six years, and that’s on top of the $16 million option the team already picked up for 2013.

Contemporaries Evan Longoria of Tampa Bay and Ryan Zimmerman of Washington have signed $100-million contracts. Based on that, the Mets believe they are making a fair-market deal.

CEO Jeff Wilpon said the preference is to have both Wright and R.A. Dickey play out next season and become free agents rather than trade them. The thinking is the compensatory draft picks would be more valuable than a handful of mid-level prospects and major league caliber reserves. Let’s face it, the Mets certainly won’t get players comparable to Wright.

On a related note, the Mets want to avoid the potential public relations disaster of having Wright and Dickey leave, only to come back as All-Stars with another team at the 2013 All-Star Game at Citi Field.

Such an occurrence would be far more damaging public-relations wise than letting Jose Reyes go last winter without an offer.

Wright’s agents are expected to reject the offer, as most first offers are. This will be Wright’s last chance for a big payday because he’ll be 36 or 37 by the time the new contract expires.

Ideally, Wright wants a contract long on years, similar to the one the Rays gave Longoria. However, Wright’s numbers haven’t been what they were earlier in his career and the last four seasons have included a variety of injuries. That would create some question from the Mets about his durability, although he played a full season in 2012 (156 games).

The average yearly salary would be $16.6 million, which represents a slight raise from the $16 million he’ll get this season. That certainly won’t fly with Wright’s agents.

Nov 25

Mets’ Alderson Graded Highly By Ownership

I have been hearing how Sandy Alderson will be held accountable for the Mets’ performance this summer and I don’t believe that to be the case, regardless of what happens with David Wright and R.A. Dickey.

Alderson is getting A’s across the board, because those handing out the grades aren’t the fans or the press, or even his colleagues. Grading Alderson are the Wilpons, who are passing him with gold stars because he is doing exactly what is expected of him.

Alderson was brought in here at the urging of Wilpon’s friend, Commissioner Bud Selig, with the purpose of bringing some stability by slashing payroll for a floundering franchise.

To that degree, he has done his job.

Alderson acted to clean up the Mets’ toxic contracts by cutting Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo, and despite it being too late, finally Jason Bay.

He also traded Carlos Beltran for prospect Zach Wheeler, and got rid of Francisco Rodriguez, who embarrassed the team by getting into a fight with his father-in-law outside the family lounge at Citi Field.

Best of all for the Wilpons, is he took the Mets into the 2012 season with a $100 million payroll, some $43 million less than in 2011. A good part of that was because of the decision to let go of Jose Reyes, thereby shedding the Mets of another potentially burdensome contract for a player with an injury history.

Doing so might help the Mets extend the contracts of Wright and Dickey, that is, if the team wants to make that call. As of now, talks seem stagnant.

The Mets have a myriad of holes and issues, with few immediate answers. On the plus side are young pitchers Jon Niese, Matt Harvey and Wheeler to give them a promising rotation from which to build.

Losing Wright and Dickey would be damaging to the Mets on the field, but they will benefit from compensatory draft picks. At worst, the Mets restart their rebuilding program, but they would further reduce payroll.

There are voids in the bullpen and outfield, and also questions in the rotation and at catcher.

Clearly, they are several years away, and based on that Alderson should be strongly judged.

However, the criteria the Wilpons are using to evaluate Alderson is in reducing payroll and toward that end, he is passing the test.

Alderson has already been evaluated by the people whose opinion of him matter most.

Nov 19

What Should The Years Limit Be For David Wright?

I like David Wright and want the Mets to sign him to an extension.

However, the question is: For how long?

The other day I wrote the Mets should get going and sign him and R.A. Dickey. What I should have said is they should put their best offer on the table, and if nothing else, be creative. My thoughts were the longer this drags on – especially after saying they wanted to get something done quickly – the more their price rises, as does the chances of losing them.

WRIGHT: How much? How long?

Contracts over five years are in vogue for superstars, Derek Jeter, Albert Pujols, Prince Fielder and Alex Rodriguez all received them based on past and future performance. However, most of these teams have, or will, regret the decision. The Yankees certainly do with Rodriguez. Pujols likely gave his best to the Cardinals.

These deals are precarious, as evidenced by the contract Johan Santana signed with the Mets. Then again, the Mets regretted four with Jason Bay. Injuries are always a risk, but seldom do players produce as they did in the seasons leading up to the payday.

The Mets didn’t want to give a long-term deal to Jose Reyes because they feared him breaking down physically. The Mets had plenty of signs about Reyes’ durability, and are now getting the same indicators with Wright.

From 2005-2008, when the Mets played in Shea Stadium – and for the most part he was surrounded in the line-up with sluggers Carlos Beltran and Carlos Delgado – Wright was an offensive force, never hitting below .300 and never having an on-base percentage less than .388. He never hit fewer than 26 homers, drive in less than 100 runs, or have a .912 OPS.

Those numbers would have been worthy of a $100-million plus deal.

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