Jan 21

Sandy Alderson’s Odd Sense Of Humor

A message to Sandy Alderson: Stop with the jokes and sign an outfielder.

Under normal circumstances, he might be funny, but Alderson’s sense of humor is getting a little thin. From joking about driving to spring training to his speech at the Baseball Writers’ Association of America when he cracked wise about the Mets’ outfield, Alderson’s humor strikes a nerve.

The other night he said: “A message to Mets fans: There’s been a lot of talk about our outfield. And I want you to know that I’m in serious discussions with several outfielders I met on the Internet. There’s one I really like. He says he played at Stanford.’’

A not-so-veiled reference to Manti Te’o, but not funny. Everybody is a comedian, but the Mets are a team looking at another losing season and are demonstrating an unwillingness to spend much, if anything, to change that conclusion.

I understand Alderson wants to lighten things up a bit, but the Mets are asking their dwindling fan base to spend a lot of money to come to Citi Field to see their team and they want something worth watching. With the joking, Alderson leaves the impression Mets fans’ concerns aren’t all that serious.

At least that would be the first thing that would come to mind is I were spending thousands to watch the Mets.

Jan 18

Santana Wants To Pitch In WBC

I understand Johan Santana’s desire to represent his native Venezuela in the World Baseball Classic, but that doesn’t make it a good idea. And, not because I’m not crazy about the whole WBC concept.

The Mets have been burned by players being injured in the WBC before – Oliver Perez – and who is to say the fragile Santana won’t come up lame?

Santana is currently on the WBC’s injury-disqualified list because he ended last year on the disabled list, not having pitched after Aug. 17 because of lower back problems. Even so, he wants to push this through.

Santana made his full complement of starts, 34, in 2008, his first season with the Mets, but hasn’t done so since. He didn’t pitch in 2011 following shoulder surgery and made only 21 starts (117 innings) last year.

For this, he has been paid over $100 million and will make $31 million this season (including a $5.5 million buyout for 2014).  For this, he won just 46 games for the Mets and only once game them at least 200 innings.

For Santana to be declared eligible the WBC must clear him physically and then be insured so the Mets aren’t stuck with the entire bill if he does get injured. Privately, Santana getting hurt in the WBC and the Mets not being stuck with his entire salary would be a plus.

SANTANA: Should stay away from WBC this spring.

I realize in today’s world this is an outdated thought, but considering all he has made and stands to make from the Mets, and considering a healthy Santana could make going to Citi Field a good thing this summer – if not for the remote trade possibility – I would have hoped Santana would show the Mets some loyalty.

They made Santana rich beyond his wildest dreams, but never pitched one playoff game for them.

Santana is a smart guy and knows the Mets won’t pick up his option for 2014, but one would hope he’d be smart enough not to risk anything in the WBC. Since he won’t be thinking he owes the Mets to be at his physical peak, if nothing else he should be thinking about staying healthy for somebody else in 2014.

After all, this is all about him.

Jan 14

What Would A Successful 2013 Look Like For Mets?

Here we are, a month away from spring training, and really last summer’s collapse doesn’t seem that far away.

The winter is for expectations, grandiose in some cities that fell short last year and tepid in others. In Flushing, what would a successful season look like?

On paper, it’s not even close, the Mets aren’t as good as they were when the season ended with them 14 games under .500. And, they were struggling to get that kind of record.

Let’s look at the progress they’ve made:

* Their Cy Young Award winning 20-game winner, R.A. Dickey was traded for prospects – one of which is coming off back and knee injuries, which aren’t good for a catcher – at least two years away.

* Another starter, Dillon Gee, is a health issue, as is their $25 million investment in Johan Santana. That makes Jon Niese, with a career-high 13 victories, their de facto ace.

* There have been no significant additions to a “Let’s-see-what-they-can-do’’ outfield. I guess it is better by the subtraction of Jason Bay, who’ll hit at least 20 homers for Seattle (Who can’t feel that?).

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Jan 04

Mets Matters: Chris Young Again?

I’ve written it several times, and it could be true: The Mets might add Chris Young to fill the void left by the trade of R.A. Dickey. For those scoring at home, Young won four games last year while Dickey won 20.

Yeah, that should be enough.

When contemplating bringing back Young, the key numbers are 20 starts and 115 innings, important because he is coming off surgery to repair a torn anterior capsule in his right shoulder.

Should Young stay healthy he’s worth it, but nobody knows for sure. Of course, if he’s healthy and pitching well at the break, he could be a chip that could be traded.

SOCCER AT CITI FIELD: You know things aren’t going well when soccer doesn’t want to deal with you.

Reportedly, the Mets want to bring an expansion MLS team to Citi Field, but the league prefers building its own stadium at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. That’s a pretty arrogant stance considering where soccer rates in this country.

Unless the MLS wants to fund the project 100 percent, New York City should tell the league to take a hike. There are so many other priorities for New York, and this was prior to the damages caused by Sandy that a soccer stadium shouldn’t even be left open for discussion.

“An MLS team at Citi Field is a nonstarter for us,’’ MLS spokesperson Rita Heller said. “A soccer stadium in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park is a win for soccer fans, a win for the Queens community and a win for economic development.’’

What else would you expect her to say?

When a team begging for public funds talks about “economic development,’’ for the community it is time to run.

DUDA SAYS HE’S ON TRACK:  Lucas Duda, two months removed from surgery on his right wrist, said he would be ready for spring training.

He already has started throwing in California and plans to begin hitting in the next week or so.

Duda, projected to the left fielder, is already throwing and should start swinging the bat next week.

Currently, the Mets’ outfield is Duda, Kirk Nieuwenhuis in center and Mike Baxter in right. One bench option is Collin Cowgill, who was acquired from Oakland. The Mets are also thinking about using reserve infielder Justin Turner off the bench.

The Mets don’t have any plans to re-sign Scott Hairston, who is seeking two years on his contract extension. The competition for another right-handed hitting outfielder could fall between Andrew Brown and Brian Bixler.

 

Jan 02

From Wright To Alderson To Davis, Mets’ 2013 Resolutions

With the beginning of the year for making plans for improvement, let’s take a look at some of the resolutions the Mets should be making today.

THE WILPONS: You are the proud owners of a major league baseball team worth close to a billion dollars – that includes Citi Field and SNY – so act like it. With attendance steadily declining along with the yearly win total, the Wilpons should resolve to start spending to upgrade their team of sell it. Enough is enough. Start writing checks to clean up this mess.

WRIGHT: Just ease up when it gets tough. (AP)

SANDY ALDERSON: You were brought in to straighten out the Mets’ financial problems. Now it is time to bring in the talent to make this team competitive. You did it in Oakland and San Diego, now comes your biggest challenge. Reportedly, Alderson has been given a bigger budget, now don’t treat it like it is your money.

TERRY COLLINS: You were brought in change the culture, but that hasn’t been the case. Collins has been a little spotty in the accountability department and that has to change. He must resolve to kick some butt when it comes lapses in concentration, thrown-away at-bats and poor pitch selection from his pitchers. The culture can’t change if Collins doesn’t demand more from his players.

DAVID WRIGHT: OK, you’re getting your long term commitment and enough money to last 100 lifetimes. There have been too many times when Wright takes it upon himself to carry the Mets on his shoulders when the team slides. When things are going to hell for the Mets, Wright needs to resolve to shorten his swing, shrink his strike zone and go the opposite way. Wright must realize he’s little help to the Mets when he’s trying to hit a five-run homer.

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