Jul 17

Matt Harvey Effectively Wild In Audition

A no-hitter would have been too much to ask for, but Matt Harvey took one into the sixth. Harvey walked four, hit a batter and gave up three hits, but pitched with poise as he passed his audition Monday night in Buffalo.

HARVEY: Kept his head (Mets)

Expect him to pitch this weekend against the Dodgers. Does he believe he’s ready?

“I do,” he told reporters. “Today I obviously wasn’t happy with as many walks. I feel like my last couple of starts have been pretty good. And I’m feeling confident with all of my pitches.”

Of course, what else is he going to say?

As I watched, I didn’t care too much about the walks – he’ll have to do better Saturday – but instead paid attention to how he kept his composure in pitching out of trouble. He did an admirable job.

The Mets made no announcement after the game, but I’d bet on seeing him at Citi Field this weekend.

Jun 15

Mets’ Appeal Denied

As it should have been, the MLB denied the Mets’ appeal on R.A. Dickey’s one-hitter. The Mets’ argument was it should have been a no-hitter because they believe David Wright committed an error.

The denial came down shortly before tonight’s game against Cincinnati at Citi Field.

Manager Terry Collins said the process allowed an appeal so he rolled the dice.

“We didn’t win,” Collins said. “We didn’t expect to win it. We gave it a try. If we had won it, we would have had another no-hitter and we wouldn’t have to wait another 50 years.”

It was the proper call by MLB, which would have opened a Pandora’s Box if it allowed the appeal.


Jun 15

Mets’ Lineup Tonight Against Reds

The Mets, losers of six of seven before their sweep of Tampa Bay, will attempt  to stay on their roll tonight against Cincinnati at Citi Field. Here’s tonight’s lineup against the Reds:

Kirk Nieuwenhuis – CF

Daniel Murphy – 2B

David Wright – 3B

Lucas Duda – RF

Ike Davis – 1B

Jason Bay – LF

Josh Thole – C

Omar Quintanilla – SS

Dillon Gee – RHP

LINEUP COMMENTS: Glad to see Terry Collins sticking with Kirk Neiuwenhuis instead of sending him to the bench. Collins must stay with Jason Bay for now since he had a few hits the other day. If Bay get hot, it might be a good idea to slot him between Lucas Duda and Ike Davis.

May 27

R.A. Dickey, Mets Cap Banner Weekend

When the Mets’ schedule came out today was a game I circled on my calendar.  Banner Day at Citi Field and the revival of one of the Mets’ great traditions. I used to love Banner Day simply because of its uniqueness. No team had anything remotely as close.

DICKEY: Has Padres guessing all day.

Speaking of uniqueness, what’s more unique than R.A. Dickey’s knuckler? Maybe it burst onto the Mets’ lore as an aberration and a gimmick, but it is getting better and better, damn near unhittable.

After today, Dickey is 7-1 and you tell me anybody more deserving to be named to the All-Star team? As of now, he should start. He along with David Wright.

This last week as been rough for me physically, but the Mets have made the time fly, and it has been fun. Loved watching Dickey toy with the Padres today. Looking forward to tomorrow afternoon’s holiday game with the Phillies. Wish it was a doubleheader.

This is developing into a compelling and interesting baseball season, and the Mets are making a lot of positive headlines. Six games over .400 with June days away. I couldn’t have asked for more.


Apr 25

It Was Wright Or Reyes

Jose Reyes received cheers last night. He also heard boos from the largely uninspired Citi Field crowd. Reyes didn’t exactly pack them in last night, did he?

REYES: Smiles before the boos.

David Wright wasn’t surprised by the lukewarm ovation, saying some people would never forgive Reyes while others understood why he left.

Reyes simply said the Mets never made him an offer, which he took to mean they didn’t want him. There can be no other explanation.

In retrospect, despite lip service to the contrary, the Mets were never going to be in it for Reyes. This is a player who makes his living with his legs, but missed considerable time the previous two seasons with assorted muscle pulls. The first years of his career were the same.

Reyes is a breakdown waiting to happen. He is a high maintenance sports car frequently in the shop.

What Reyes didn’t say last night, was he was in it for the last dollar and the Mets knew they couldn’t swim in that end of the pool. No, the Mets didn’t go out of their way last year to keep Reyes, but he didn’t exactly go out of his way to say he wanted to stay.

It was an inevitable divorce; two parties seeing the end and doing nothing to stay together. Passive aggressive? Not committing is a statement.

The Mets, not knowing their future finances, did know they couldn’t keep Reyes, then re-sign Wright, and then fill in the rest of the pieces. It just wasn’t going to happen. It couldn’t happen with Johan Santana and Jason Bay on the payroll, and after all that money wasted on Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo and others. Even with Carlos Beltran and Francisco Rodriguez gone, the Mets couldn’t afford to keep both. Not with what they knew at the time.

The choice was Reyes’ flash and speed against Wright’s power and consistency. While both had sustained injuries, the Mets decided Wright might last longer at the top of his game than Reyes, even with the latter having a stellar year and winning the batting title.

Reyes had injuries the previous two years and had already been on the disabled list twice last summer. When he returned the second time, he turned it off as to not risk hurting himself and his chances in the market. In doing so, they had to wonder if this decline would continue and what he would be like at the end of his contract.

Conversely, Wright hurt his back, but it was in making an aggressive play. These things happen. Wright lost his power stroke hitting 14 homers last year, but after 29 the season before. The Mets’ gamble, enhanced by moving in the fences, was Wright could sustain being a power hitter longer than Reyes could be a speed threat.

Power is more marketable, and so is Wright’s personality and grit. Reyes tweaks a hamstring and is out for two weeks; Wright played a month with a small fracture in his back and this year with a broken pinkie.

Wright plays with passion; Reyes plays with flair. Which would burn out first?

The Mets might have gotten their answer when Reyes took himself out of the season finale after bunting for a hit to preserve his batting title. I can’t imagine Wright pulling himself from a game for such a me-first motive. Reyes turned his back on the fans who supported him and came out to say good bye.

Maybe the Mets and Reyes weren’t loyal to each other, but the fans were loyal to Reyes and he dissed them. Mets fans have, and always will have, an inferiority complex. It comes from being the second team in town. And, in leaving, Reyes reinforced that insecurity and told the public Miami’s millions were more important than the Mets’ millions.

He was saying New York wasn’t good enough. Meanwhile, Wright has been saying New York is all he wants.

It really wasn’t a hard decision after all.