Oct 05

Something with your morning coffee ….

This Day in Baseball History

This Day in Baseball History

One of the greatest catches in World Series history took place on this date in 1947. It was the bottom of the sixth inning in Game 6 at Yankee Stadium when Joe DiMaggio launched a long drive to deep left.
GIONFRIDDO: Robs DiMaggio.

GIONFRIDDO: Robs DiMaggio.


With two runners on it was certain the Dodgers’ three-run lead would be erased. However, Al Gionfriddo, acquired from Pittsburgh earlier in the season, closed the gap and reached over the wall to rob DiMaggio. The catch brought a rise out of the normally dour and unemotional DiMaggio, who kicked at the dirt out of frustration.

The Dodgers would hold on to win Game 6, but the Yankees won Game 7 to clinch the series.

TODAY’S SPORTS BIRTHDAY

1937 – Barry Switzer, football coach (Oklahoma).

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They Said It

They Said It

With their season over from a competitive standpoint, there were those – myself included – who believed Carlos Beltran should’ve shut it down for the remainder of the season.

Beltran said he needed to play to prove his health to himself, and yesterday indicated he doesn’t anticipate his knees would become a problem.

Said Beltran: “People asked me, ‘Why are you coming back?’ But, as a player you have to come back and I did. Now I can go in to the off-season feeling good about myself. I can get ready, be in the best condition I can be in, and get ready for spring training.’’

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ON TAP FOR TODAY

Today the lockers at Citi Field start to get cleared out. Players will be drifting in for the next few days. Some who don’t think they’ll be a part of the Mets next season, could come early and leave before the media is brought to the clubhouse.

Manager Jerry Manuel said there could be some announcements regarding his coaching staff. Third base coach Razor Shines, who waved on over 20 runners that were eventually thrown out at the plate, could be gone. Pitching coach Dan Warthen could be dismissed because of a staff that walked over 500 batters, and regressions by Mike Pelfrey and Oliver Perez.

ELSEWHERE IN SPORTS

The Tigers and Twins will have a one-game playoff tomorrow in the Metrodome. The stadium couldn’t be used tonight because the Packers-Vikings Monday night game is scheduled. ESPN is expecting huge ratings as the game pits Minnesota quarterback Brett Favre against his former team.

THE WEEK AHEAD

In addition to what news comes out of the Mets, I will also be reviewing the season and analyzing who will be available in the free agent market. I will also be handicapping and previewing the Division Series, and, of course, live blogging the playoffs as I did last year. … I also hope you’ll be with me tomorrow night for the Monday night game between Minnesota and Green Bay.

Oct 04

METS CHAT ROOM: Game #162; A sadness about the day.

In each of the past two seasons, the Mets faced their season finale with hope and a definable tension. The Mets would either extend their season or see it end in a frustrating ball of fire. They flamed out both in 2007 and 2008 to suddenly face the winter.

There’s none of that today.

This afternoon at Citi Field comes the official death of a season long since dead. It is a parent or relative who succumbs after a long illness. There’s almost a sense of relief at the death, that most of the grieving has been done and it is time to for a new chapter.

The end of a sports season marks a passage of time, and like many passages there’s a sadness because it represents unfulfilled dreams and the leaving behind of something special. There’s nothing quite as sad as the death of dream.

MANUEL: He didn't inspire.

MANUEL: He didn't inspire.


Despite how each of the last two seasons ended, there was hope and optimism this spring in Port St. Lucie. This was Jerry Manuel’s first full season as Mets manager and with it a return of hope this summer would be different.

There was attention paid to fundamentals, which was to provide a security blanket that even if there would be no power the team would somehow score, and with their pitching that would be enough. Surgery was to have healed John Maine’s aching shoulder and Mike Pelfrey would continue his progress.

Most importantly from a pitching perspective, the bullpen, the Achilles heal the past two years, was fixed and was to be stronger with Francisco Rodriguez than it ever was with Billy Wagner.

PELFREY: He took a step back.

PELFREY: He took a step back.


Offensively, Carlos Delgado was back hitting home runs and Daniel Murphy was to be the answer in left field. David Wright and Jose Reyes, the homegrown part of the core, were to get better. Carlos Beltran would simply produce as usual.

The Mets entered the season with a chip on their collective shoulders after Cole Hamel’s choke comments. Yes, this was to be a turnaround season for the Mets, and it was going to unfold in a brand new home.

It didn’t happen that way.

The seasons of Maine, Pelfrey and Oliver Perez were a combination of ineffectiveness and injury, and injury also caused the unraveling of the bullpen. Bobby Parnell was good and bad in a variety of roles, and it remains to be seen whether his psyche is a permanent casualty. Rodriguez was not as good as advertised, and those who accepted his signing with caution were unfortunately rewarded in perhaps being right. We do not know how healthy he is and who doesn’t anticipate unsettling offseason news?

Of all the injuries, losing Reyes was the most harmful as it took away the team’s offensive catalyst. What should have been a few days on the bench turned into a lost season. It’s still not over for Reyes as he faces surgery and an uncertain recovery program.

WRIGHT: Was off before the beaning.

WRIGHT: Was off before the beaning.


Beltran and Delgado were lost for large chunks of time, as was Wright’s power stroke in a frustrating twist. Wright was never with us mechanically this season from a run production standpoint, but somehow he managed to hit over .300. He also managed to strike out over 130 times. He faces a long road in trying to become the player he once was. As far as Delgado is concerned, well, we’ll never see him in a Met uniform again.

Unless the Mets hit five home runs today, they will be the only team in the major leagues to hit less than 100 homers this season. And, about those fundamentals that was supposed to keep the team afloat? We didn’t see them and that is a reflection on Manuel.

There have been several crushing defeats this season, with the first being Murphy’s dropped fly ball in Florida that cost Johan Santana a game. It also represented the failure of Murphy as an outfielder. Only after Delgado was injured did Murphy find a defensive home, and even then he was tenuous.

There were others.

Luis Castillo’s return as a productive offensive player was tempered by his poor defense, with the dropped pop-fly at Yankee Stadium the signature loss to this season.

REYES: The injury that hurt most.

REYES: The injury that hurt most.


The Mets also lost a game on Sean Green’s wild pitch in Philadelphia, a sign the bullpen wasn’t quite fixed. There was also the game in which they blew a five-run lead to Pittsburgh and Rodriguez’s disastrous five-run ninth at Washington. Rodriguez blew seven save opportunities, but was forever pitching on the edge. For good measure, twice in one week the Mets lost games on late-inning grand slams.

No, the bullpen is not fixed.

However, to me, the game that summed up the wreck that was the Summer of 2009 was Ryan Church’s failure to touch third base in Los Angeles. Physical errors happen. But, this was a mental thing. Stepping on a base is as simple and fundamental thing a player can do in the sport and the Mets couldn’t even do that right.

All that misery comes to an end this afternoon at Citi Field. The Mets will try to end their season with a sweep with a win. A win in each of the last season finales could have meant October fun. If they get it today, it will be hollow as winter will still come.

Oct 04

About Yesterday ….

Yesterday’s victory over Houston assured the Mets of winning their final series of the season and a winning record at home in their first year of Citi Field. Oh boy!!!!

Pat Misch pitched well again, giving up a run on five hits in five innings before the rains came. He won for the third time this month and is meriting consideration for the fifth starter job next spring. He’s left-handed, which is always a plus. But, remember, before this stretch he was a journeyman.

A 2010 rotation with Misch in it could be interesting, but maybe not in a good way.

After a torrid start, Josh Thole hit the skids, and his triple broke a 1-for-22 slide. It was probably a good thing Thole went into a slump as to not ratchet up the expectations. He does have a presence about him, but it’s premature to say he’s ready.

Sean Green had pitched well lately, but three walks in 1 2/3 innings to force a save situation served as a reminder of his inconsistency this season. So much more was expected of him. The walks, however, brought on Francisco Rodriguez for his 35th save.

Oct 01

Mets to give fans a break on 2010 tickets ….

The Mets sent the following letter to season ticket holders:

“Everyone at the Mets – our Ownership, GM Omar Minaya, Manager Jerry Manuel, the coaches, players, front office and staff – shares your disappointment with the 2009 season. You soon will hear from Ownership and Omar about how we plan to improve the ball club through a combination of player signings, trades, enhanced player development and continued commitment to one of the highest player payrolls in MLB.

“We are currently finalizing our ticket pricing for 2010. Season Ticket prices will be reduced by an average of more than 10 percent, with several seating areas being adjusted by more than 20 percent. Every Season Ticket Holder invoice for 2010 will be less than 2009.”

Well, I would hope so. There was a lot of promise for this season, from the expectations on the field to Citi Field itself, that went unrealized. It was a terribly disappointing season and it wouldn’t be unrealistic to think this might not be a one-year thing, that the Mets are on a downward spiral they won’t be able to pull themselves out of.

What the Mets are doing is thank the public for its support. This is a good gesture, one which should dispel some of the talk of the team being in financial distress because of the Ponzi scam. Let’s face it, if the Mets were really hurting financially they wouldn’t cut prices.