Dec 03

Matsui?

Omar Minaya is seeking the medical records of Hideki Matsui. Just informational. Doesn’t mean they are about to sign him to a three-year deal. Even so, it says the Mets could be thinking in that direction. I like Matsui, but his time has come and he’s a DH-type now. He’s not going to be able to cover that left field at Citi Field without some kind of breakdown.

Nov 22

“Toto, there’s no place like home.”

I don’t know why it took criticism and a year to do these things, but better late than never. Even so, the Mets made three announcements Saturday reflecting the ties to their past that should have been announced when Citi Field opened.

CITI FIELD: Missed the link to the old.

CITI FIELD: Missed the link to the old.


First, various VIP entrances were named after: Gil Hodges, Tom Seaver and Casey Stengel. The outfield bridge will be named Shea bridge.

Secondly, there will be a Hall of Fame, which should have been in the original blue prints. It will be next the Jackie Robinson Rotundra.

Lastly, there will be banners of Mets players on Mets Plaza in front of the Jackie Robinson Rotunda and the light poles in the parking lots will be adorned with the team’s logo.

Yes, this is something that should should have been done in the beginning, but better late than never. I love it when a team acknowledges its past. The Mets history isn’t as successful as several teams, say the Yankees, Dodgers and Cardinals, but it is colorful and rich and closing in on 50 years.

There’s no question the fans honor Mets history. The team should do the same.

Oct 26

Mets’ nightmare comes true ….

The worst case scenario for Mets’ fans of a World Series between their two greatest rivals – the Yankees and Phillies – has reached fruition.

The Mets were left eating the dust of both, and they don’t appear to be in position to challenge either any time soon.

New York City, which some have argued is a National League town, belongs totally to the Yankees, who are in their 40th World Series seeking their 27th championship. Four World Series; two titles for the Mets.

YANKEES: Always the Mets' yardstick.

YANKEES: Always the Mets' yardstick.


The National League, for the second straight season, is owned by Philadelphia, seeking to become the first repeat champion since the Yankees, 1998-2000.

Many fans I speak to say they won’t watch, saying they don’t know whom to hate more. Selfishly, that’s not good news for me and the blog. Hopefully, the “baseball fan” in them will tune in.

However, the Mets and their fans, instead of lamenting their closed window, which slammed shut after a second straight September collapse in 2008, should step back and learn from their two tormentors.

The Mets, and probably nobody else, will match the October success the Yankees built over the last century. So what? What’s important is now.

Both teams opened new stadiums this summer, but the Yankees brought with them a revamped and retooled team. The Yankees took care of multiple needs last winter and added power in Mark Teixeira and pitching in CC Sabathia and AJ Burnett. The Mets, also having multiple needs, but addressed only the bullpen with the belief things will get better with a veteran closer.

Rarely does it work that way, as building one area of a team doesn’t address the other voids. Watch, win or lose over the next week, the Yankees will address their team aggressively in the offseason. They know they don’t have enough starting pitching; they know there are bullpen questions; the outfield is an issue with the possible departures of Hideki Matsui and Johnny Damon.

The difference between the Yankees and Mets is that the team in the Bronx has a mission statement every season of WINNING the World Series. Getting there is not enough. And, please, let’s not hear about the Yankees’ unlimited resources. The Mets’ payroll is also formidable, but their approach is not nearly as aggressive.

PHILLIES: The team to beat.

PHILLIES: The team to beat.


As for the Phillies, they’ve also been more aggressive in filling holes than the Mets. The Phillies have a home grown core (Ryan Howard, Cole Hamels, Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins) as do the Mets (David Wright and Jose Reyes), but Philadelphia has been superior in filling its holes (Shane Victorino, Jayson Werth, Raul Ibanez and Cliff Lee).

The Phillies will not stand still, even should they repeat. Unlike the Mets, the Phillies have the minor league resources to package should they decide to pursue Roy Halladay. The Yankees, of course, have always been known to be willing to part with minor league talent to win immediately.

Compounding the Mets’ dilemma with the Phillies, is that they aren’t their only competition in the National League East. Both Florida and Atlanta improved this season to overtake the Mets.

Both the Phillies and Mets, from the front office to the dugout, have a mindset beyond that of the Mets’ thinking, which gives the appearance of settling to become competitive.

The Mets had a good year at the gate, drawing 3.1 million (averaging 38,000), which was seventh in the majors (the Yankees and Phillies finished 2-3). However, rave reviews for Citi Field aren’t what’s important in the big picture. To keep drawing, and even increasing attendance is dependent on the quality of the product on the field.

Eventually, Citi Field will stop becoming a fan magnet, which is what happened in Baltimore and Cleveland when the Orioles and Indians hit the skids. Citi Field is too expensive, and New York City offers so many other diversions, for fans to keep coming out of curiosity.

Right now, Mets’ fans should only be curious about one thing: What is their team going to do to close the gap on the Phillies and Yankees?

Oct 18

No big names coming ….

The names are enticing with Matt Holliday and Roy Halladay, Jason Bay and John Lackey. Any, and all would make the Mets a better team in 2010. Except, I don’t believe any will be playing in Citi Field next summer in the home whites.

Bay appears to be staying in Boston and Holliday will be costly. The Mets don’t have the prospects package, nor the inclination to pay a package similar to the one they gave Johan Santana, to acquire Halladay. And, reportedly Lackey doesn’t want to play in New York.

More and more I believe the Mets are hoping their injured players return and the best they’ll get in a middle-tier free-agent pitcher to plug into their beleaguered rotation.

It is premature to say the Mets don’t have a plan, but there isn’t a lot of reason to be optimistic right now.

Oct 16

It’s about heart ….

In watching the Phillies play, I would think Mets fans would fall in love with this team if they played in Citi Field. They show the heart and hustle and spunk Mets fans demand from their team, but haven’t received in a long time.

The Phillies make things happen, and as powerful as they are, it isn’t always with the long ball. In that regard, they and the Angels are the playoff teams having the grit Mets fans desire for their team.

The Yankees?

The Yankees are the Yankees, they’ll always be good because they can’t accept losing. Mets fans would love that mentality from their management. But, the Yankees, and their fans, also carry a sense of entitlement with them that is annoying.

I believe, that after the disappointment of the 2006 season, the Mets carried with them a sense of expectations of winning. That’s good, but the reality was they overestimated themselves and believed they were better than they were, which isn’t good.

Hopefully, and I have my doubts, the Mets learned from the 2009 train wreck. If they believe that just being healthy will put them over the top, they are mistaken. This team has talent, but not enough. It lacks the pitching, the fundamental base, and all too often, the heart of a champion.

There were far too many times this season when they mailed it in.