Jun 29

Mets Selling Team Memorabilia Shameful

First, it was Mike Piazza‘s game-worn jersey from the night of his post 9-11 homer against the Braves that went up for auction. Now, it is his helmet. What next, his jock?

Then again, we shouldn’t be surprised. People will buy anything, and if you read the Joe DiMaggio biography you will realize how corrupt and sleazy the sports memorabilia industry can be.

iSeveral Mets minority owners purchased the jersey for $365,000 and display it on a rotating basis at the Mets’ Hall of Fame at Citi Field, the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, and the September 11 Museum in Lower Manhattan. All good places.

Goldin Auctions will accept bids for the helmet unless another white knight rides in. The auction house said ten percent of the sale price will be donated to Tuesday’s Children, a charity supporting first responders.

The Mets were blistered over the jersey and deservedly so. They should be torched for the helmet. They should be singled out every time this happens, and you know it will. The team issued a statement to ESPN: “This item was sold in 2013. In April this year, we instituted a new process with internal controls to prevent something like this from happening again in the future.”

The “what next?” question is a legitimate one. Surely, the Mets have a list of the items they sold – and for what price – to collectors, if for no other reason to report on their taxes. The Mets do pay taxes, don’t they?

To sell memorabilia, especially of a sensitive nature as the post 9-11 variety is cold, callous and totally disregards their history. I’d like to know what other items the Mets sold off to pay down their Ponzi scheme losses.

It is shameful it came to this. Major League Baseball has enough policies, but it would be good to institute a blanket rule no franchise can secretly sell off its history. If a team won’t donate it to Cooperstown or display it in its own museum, it should be given to the player involved.

It shouldn’t that hard, but for the Mets and Major League Baseball, it always is.

Jun 27

Mets Must Give Us Reason To Care

Sometimes listening to Terry Collins makes me want to scream. I know I’ve written that before, but Collins keeps making “I want to throw my shoe at the TV” type of comments. The Mets’ manager said several things over the weekend in preparation for tonight’s game in Washington that were simply puzzling. He means well, but it becoming clearer with each press briefing he can’t think on his feet.

First, after Jacob deGrom‘s start – his tenth straight without a win – Collins said he was looking forward to coming out of the break so he could set up his rotation. Well, what about setting things up now for the next two weeks, which includes seven games in two series against the Nationals. three with the Marlins and four against the Cubs?

COLLINS: Facing toughest stretch of season. (AP)

COLLINS: Facing toughest stretch of season. (AP)

I would begin by skipping Noah Syndergaard tonight in Washington because of his second complaint of soreness in his right elbow. Would I sacrifice a game in Washington to preserve Syndergaard for the second half? Damn straight I would.

After Monday’s butt whiping, the Mets are now four games behind the Nationals – who won’t have Stephen Strasburg for either series – because Washington’s seven-game losing streak kept them in the race. If the Nationals had any killer instinct they could be up by eight games or more with a chance to put away the Mets. Who knows, maybe they were waiting for the Mets to come to town to do it.

Collins told reporters Sunday in Atlanta in preparation for the Nationals series: “The worst-case scenario is: Go to the break no worse than we are sitting right now. Right after the Nats we’ve got the Cubs – arguably the best team in baseball right now. We’ve got to be ready. We’ve got to get the `A’ game going and maintain it. Right after them you’ve got the Marlins, who are playing very, very well right now. And then back come the Nationals again. I think the next 14 days are very, very important to us.”

Good for Collins; he can read a schedule. But, with |these games so important, why send the message of mediocrity? We watched the Mets pull things together and get to the World Series last year. Now their manager is talking about treading water until the break. At least that’s the perception.

Standing pat in the standings for the next two weeks and at the trade deadline aren’t acceptable for a World Series team. I don’t want Collins to panic, but a sense of urgency would be nice. The disadvantage of getting to the World Series is the expectation to go every year. That’s pressure, but also why they play.

We’ll watch Syndergaard tonight with crossed fingers and the hope we won’t get Antonio Bastardo. I don’t trust the bullpen now, with even Addison Reed and Jeurys Familia giving me pause. The offense is beyond awful. No homers, no wins. Manufacturing runs and playing fundamental baseball seem beyond their comprehension. There were more than a few times in June when they didn’t hustle.

As far as their `A’ game, we haven’t seen it since the end of April. Nothing has been reported as to what Collins has said to his team behind closed doors. Evidently he hasn’t read the riot act or we would have heard about it. Somebody always talks.

Yes, there are injuries, but championship caliber teams overcome them. Otherwise, they are just excuses. There were holes in the batting order even before David Wright and Lucas Duda were hurt and Michael Conforto was sent down. Hopefully, there will be more stability when Jose Reyes is activated and Curtis Granderson can hit lower in the order. But, whether Granderson bats first, second, third or fourth, will it really matter if he doesn’t hit?

The remaining two weeks could determine whether Citi Field experiences October. You and I both know the Mets won’t run the table from until the All-Star break, but I want more than 7-7, for which Collins – at least publicly – seems willing to settle.

I want a sense of urgency. I want hustle and heaven forbid, their hitters to manufacture runs. I know Collins cares, but dammit, show some fire. Kick your players in the ass, because they need it. And, that includes Yoenis Cespedes. If your “star” can get away dogging it, it’s a license for everybody else to drop it down a gear.

Playing .500 for the next two weeks or the rest of the summer isn’t acceptable. It’s like going to school hoping for a `C’ grade. It’s average, which is the worst of the best or best of the worst. Being average gives us little reason to care.

Damn, I want to care about this team again.

Jun 20

Not A Fan Of Demoting Conforto

It’s a good thing the Mets are off Monday because playing games doesn’t seem to be good idea. Citi Field is quiet today, except for the buzz in manager Terry Collins‘ office, where he is presumably huddling with GM Sandy Alderson and his coaching staff about what to do next. At the top of the list is the decision whether to demote Michael Conforto in Triple-A Las Vegas to work on the swing that deserted him.

CONFORTO: Not of fan of demoting him. (AP)

CONFORTO: Not of fan of demoting him. (AP)

Most likely the corresponding move would be promoting Brandon Nimmo. As much as I’d like to see Nimmo – much the way I wanted to see Conforto last year – I’m not a big proponent about this move. Not yet, anyway.

I realize that’s contradictory considering I advocated sending down Matt Harvey and Ike Davis. However, these circumstances are different. With Davis, he resisted changing or his style, and had been with the Mets long enough for them to believe nothing would change. With Harvey, he was coming off

Davis resisted changing his style and had been with the Mets long enough for them to believe nothing would change. Harvey was coming off Tommy John surgery and injuries are always more complex.

Conforto doesn’t fit into any of these boxes. For one, he’s been bothered by a sore wrist, but nothing to where he needs to go on the disabled list. If he is hurt, then why is he playing? Also, reports are unlike Davis he’s very coachable and is tenure with the Mets has been short.

Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle all went down to the minors, so nobody should be immune. However, I don’t see where a Conforto for Nimmo swap is a good thing. If Conforto goes down and regains his stroke and is brought up in two weeks, what becomes of Nimmo? Theoretically, they would simply send him back down, but how does that help anybody?

If Nimmo is hitting, wouldn’t they want to keep him up here? If so, where would he play? He certainly wouldn’t replace Yoenis Cespedes or Curtis Granderson, and as is the case with most young players the Mets wouldn’t want him to ride the bench.

Conforto isn’t hitting, but neither is anybody else. I would keep Conforto on the major league level and give him an opportunity to work things out with the Mets.

Jun 19

Collins Suggests Changes Coming For Mets – But What?

The Mets had just finished being swept out of Citi Field by the Atlanta Braves on Sunday when manager Terry adamantly suggested changes were in order, if not imminent.

COLLINS: What's he going to do? (Getty)

COLLINS: What’s he going to do? (Getty)

“You don’t want to panic early, but right now with what’s going on, we may shake some things up,” Collins told reporters after the Mets had lost for the sixth time in eight games. 6-0 to the Braves and dropped into third place in the NL East.

He wouldn’t specify, but it isn’t hard to speculate what options the Mets have, or don’t have.

TRADES: There are so many Mets, who based on their contracts, health and performance are difficult to trade. With the trade deadline roughly six weeks away, conventional thinking is it is too early to be making trades because the sellers and buyers haven’t yet been defined. In the Mets’ case, they care clearly buyers now, but if this slide continues that could change.

The Mets’ biggest trade chips are their young pitching, which they don’t want to deal, primarily because they will likely need those arms if they are to contend.

The minor league pitching bait is Zack Wheeler, whom the Mets nearly traded last year for Carlos Gomez.

THE VEGAS SHUTTLE:  There’s been much speculation the Mets might sending Michael Conforto to the minor leagues. Considering the Mets pinch-hit for him the other night indicates a growing lack of confidence by Collins in the player whom he said would be the team’s long-term No. 3 hitter. Conforto is on a 7-for-56 slide and has seen his average drop over 100 points since April.

Collins said Conforto would not stay with the Mets coming off the bench, so that means if he stays he plays. If Conforto goes down, coming up would probably be outfielder Brandon Nimmo.

THE DISABLED LIST: Travis d’Arnaud is expected to be activated this week. However, if the Mets continue to form and use Rene Rivera to catch Noah Syndergaard on Tuesday, we might not see d’Arnaud until the next day,

However, there’s no timetable for Lucas Duda and we might not see Wright for the rest of the season.

THE BATTING ORDER: Yoenis Cespedes and Neil Walker will continue to hit in the middle of the order. Collins toyed with using Curtis Granderson batting third, but that didn’t last long. Asdrubal Cabrera seems best as the second hitter, although I might take a shot at him leading off and dropping Granderson ahead of Cespedes. It couldn’t hurt.

At this point, the Mets might as well try anything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 28

Mets Wrap: Plenty Of Deserving Fingers To Be Pointed In Syndergaard Fiasco

The Mets ignored the ancient Chinese proverb, “when pursuing revenge remember to dig two graves.”

The Mets finally chose Saturday night to seek retribution against Chase Utley for his hard take-out slide during last year’s NLDS against the Dodgers that resulted in a broken leg for their then shortstop Ruben Tejada.

SYNDERGAARD: Payback is a bitch. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Payback is a bitch. (AP)

The only grave filled was by the Mets and Noah Syndergaard.

The Mets eschewed retaliation against the Dodgers for the rest of the playoffs; during the four-game series in Los Angeles earlier this month; and Friday night. One school of thought was the Mets would continue to let Utley wonder, which would have been the best choice.

Instead, Syndergaard threw behind Utley’s back with one out in the third. Plate umpire Adam Hamari booted Syndergaard before the ball stopped rolling at the backstop. Utley calmly kept his head down and smoothed the dirt with his foot.

Utley homered in the sixth. If that wasn’t enough to rile Mets’ fans, then surely his grand slam in the seventh that sealed the Dodgers’ 9-1 blowout win should have been.

Utley maintained a stoic look throughout the game showing zero emotion. None.

Hamari had no choice but eject Syndergaard because whenever a pitcher deliberately wants to hit a batter he throws behind him, the thinking being the hitter will step back into the pitch.

Please, let’s not insult our intelligence by saying the ball got away because he had only walked nine hitters entering the game. Please, also don’t blame our intelligence, as SNY did, by saying Hamari didn’t have a handle on the situation because he is only a third-year umpire.

Since it’s all about blame these days, my finger is pointed at three parties for Syndergaard’s ejection.

First, let’s look at Syndergaard, who should be smart enough to know that after the buildup there would be no way he could go after Utley and skate. He’s young, but not naïve.

Second, there’s manager Terry Collins, who is not having the good start to this season. Collins has to understand the ramifications of losing Syndergaard. He made a big deal of wrongly justifying his poor decision to bring in Jeurys Familia in a non-save situation Friday because he wanted to win the game.

Don’t you think the Mets’ chances to win are enhanced with Syndergaard? When the teams played in Los Angeles, Collins warned his team about retaliation, saying he didn’t need to have anybody hurt or suspended. He didn’t have a similar message prior to this series.

For his efforts, Collins was also tossed. Collins said he was “surprised” Syndergaard was ejected so quickly without a warning. Seriously? Hasn’t he been paying attention?

Finally, Major League Baseball needs to take a bow for totally screwing up this whole situation. Here’s how:

* The umpires have discretion for ejecting a player they believe intentionally tried to injure a player. They did not.

* In response to the uproar from media and Mets fans about the play, MLB feared an incident at Citi Field when the NLDS moved to Citi Field. MLB suspended Utley for two games not because they judged it a dirty play, but because they feared an ugly scene. Joe Torre, who handles these decisions for MLB, should know more than most that is not the basis for a decision.

* When Utley’s appeal was heard this spring the original suspension was not upheld. MLB would say it was because of a new rule change, but the incident was committed under the old format.

* Finally, knowing the tension heading leading into the series – surely, the Commissioner’s office reads the New York papers – it would have been prudent to issue a warning.

This has been a total screw up from the beginning, and if Syndergaard is suspended – as Collins fears – it will only get worse.

METS GAME WRAP

May 28, 2016, @ Citi Field

Game: #48          Score:  Dodgers 9, Mets 1

Record: 28-20     Streak: L 1

Standings: First, NL East, four percentage points ahead of the Nationals.  

Runs: 187    Average:  3.87   Times 3 or less: 23

SUMMARY: Syndergaard’s retaliation attempt at Utley failed and resulted in his ejection. The Dodgers homered five times, including two by Utley, who drove in five runs.

KEY MOMENT:  Syndergaard’s ill-fated attempt to put the hammer down.

THUMBS UP:  At least they didn’t need Familia. … Juan Lagares homered for the second straight game. … Nobody got hurt. … The Nationals also lost.

THUMBS DOWN:  The whole night. … Now they have to face Clayton Kershaw. … Just three hits. … They gave up four homers. … They still don’t have a clue as to how to pitch to Utley. … The bullpen gave up nine runs and the hitters struck out ten times.

EXTRA INNINGS: David Wright did not play because of pain in his neck. There exists a possibility he could be placed on the disabled list Sunday. … Wilmer Flores could be activated from the DL Sunday. … The Mets sent cash to San Diego for first baseman James Loney.

QUOTEBOOK:  “It would be fair.’’ – Collins on if he was upset with the decision to eject Syndergaard.

BY THE NUMBERS:  34: Pitches thrown by Syndergaard.

NEXT FOR METS:  Bartolo Colon against Kershaw Sunday night.

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