Sep 22

What Should Be Alderson’s 2017 Regrets

“I always think of things I could have done differently.’’ – Mets GM Sandy Alderson, Today at Citi Field

Yeah, me too, Sandy. There are plenty of things I wish you had done differently when it came to building the 2017 New York Mets.

ALDERSON: Regrets for 2017. (AP)

ALDERSON: Regrets for 2017. (AP)

The following decisions are what I wish Alderson had done differently:

Extending Yoenis Cespedes’ contract.

I didn’t like it then and after how this season unfolded, I certainly don’t like it now. I wrote at the time I thought it was a mistake based on: 1) the $110 million earmarked for Cespedes over four years would be better spent on other areas considering all their holes; 2) Cespedes’ injury history, including last season with the Mets; 3) his history of failing to hustle, which has hurt them on multiple occasions this season.

Failure to be patient with Matt Harvey.

When Harvey’s velocity was down during spring training, pitching coach Dan Warthen said based on his thoracic surgery, he wouldn’t be full strength until the end of May. So, instead of Harvey starting the season on the disabled list, his return was pushed and he was reinjured.

Letting Noah Syndergaard call his MRI shots.

Arguably the season’s dumbest quote belonged to Alderson when his response to why he didn’t force Syndergaard to undergo an MRI, he said he couldn’t force him into the tube. Well, he should have prevented Syndergaard from pitching until he took the MRI. Syndergaard made his next start, partially tore his right lat and spent the next four months on the DL The season was effectively over that day when Syndergaard was injured. Now, he’ll start Saturday and pitch one inning.

Failure to construct a quality bullpen.

Alderson has failed to build a bullpen every offseason since he was hired and last winter was no different.

Trading Jay Bruce.

Alderson said he expects the Mets to be competitive next summer, but if that’s to be the case, it stands to reason they’ll need a left-handed bat with power. In addition to Bruce, Alderson traded Curtis Granderson, Neil Walker, Lucas Duda and Addison Reed for a handful of middling relief prospects. It remains to be seen if any of them will be around next season.

Keeping Amed Rosario and Dominic Smith in the minors.

The season was already lost, but Rosario and Smith languished in Las Vegas. Why? The moment Duda was traded Smith should have been brought up. Ditto Rosario when Asdrubal Cabrera was injured. Just not a smart move by whom Alderson’s biographer calls the game’s smartest GM.

 

Sep 15

Mr Met: Entertaining and Delighting Fans Since 1963

mr_met

Tell the unknowing that a guy with a giant baseball head, cartoonish nose, and goofy wide smile is one of the most beloved characters in sports history and you’re bound to get a reaction of disbelief.

But such a claim holds true for Mr. Met, the long time mascot of the New York Mets.

The simple truth is that Mr. Met is sure to make you smile whether you’re a diehard Mets fan, a casual fan, follow baseball for wagering opportunities, or are just human with a charitable nature.

As an early pioneer of team mascots, the humble beginnings of the Mr. Met character date back a full decade or more before most MLB teams adopted costumed characters to amuse fans. While it’s quite expected these days to see mascots engaging with fans at the ballpark, they all owe a debt to the groundbreaking Mr. Met.

He originally existed in animated form when he graced the cover of the Mets programs, scorecards, and yearbooks during the 1963 season. Several artists, including acclaimed comic book illustrator Al Avison, contributed to the concept and design of Mr. Met.

The team moved stadiums from the Polo Grounds to Shea Stadium in 1964, an occasion enhanced by the debut of Mr. Met as a live mascot.

Mr. Met graced Mets games and promotional material until 1976, when he was phased out of appearance. Presumably, he retired and was playing golf in Florida, although this has never been confirmed.

Passionate fan appeal sparked the Mets to reintroduce Mr. Met in 1994, and he has been rightfully entertaining the masses at Shea Stadium and Citi Field ever since.

In addition to his unwavering support for the Mets (we wish we had that kind of patience!), Mr. Met is a devoted family man, often bringing his lovely wife Mrs. Met along to the games. During their early days, the couple would occasionally have their three little Mets children in tow.

While he has always worn the hat of his favorite baseball team, Mr. Met has worn many figurative hats throughout his career. Off the field, he has been a cheerleader, a fundraiser, a marketer, and even a hired wedding guest.

Sep 08

Reyes Making Pitch For 2018

REYES: Auditioning for 2018. (AP)

REYES: Auditioning for 2018. (AP)

I never thought I’d write this, but it looks as if Jose Reyes is earning himself a spot on the Mets’ 2018 roster. After a miserable start, Reyes rediscovered his stroke in the second half, which culminated in two homers in tonight’s 5-1 victory over Cincinnati.

“He’s somebody who really loves to play,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “And, yes, I can see him playing a lot somewhere next year.’’

That could be with the Mets if he opts to take less, but Reyes has never been one to leave money on the table and there’s no reason to believe he will start now.

Reyes struggled hitting less than .200 for much of the season, but is up to .238 now, but with still a paltry .307 on-base percentage. He broke .200 for good, June 30, against Philadelphia.

In addition to his hot hitting since mid-June, Reyes also endeared himself to the Mets by taking Amed Rosario under his wing.

LUGO GOES SIX: Seth Lugo struck out four and gave up four hits in six scoreless innings, easily his best start of the season. Lugo threw 84 pitches, nine more than Collins set his limit at 75.

Lugo (6-4) began the season on the disabled list with an elbow injury, but still doesn’t have a spot on next year’s staff: starter or reliever?

Prior to the game, Collins said injuries sapped Lugo’s strength when he faced a lineup for the third time.

NHL COMES TO CITI FIELD: Finally. Mets Chief Operating Officer Jeff Wilpon said he’s made repeated overtures to NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman to have Citi Field host the Winter Classic on New Year’s Day. That will come to pass this New Year’s Day when the Rangers and Buffalo Sabres face off.

“Our clubs love participating in these games,’’ Bettman said. “Our fans love attending them, and iconic venues like Citi Field are anxious to host them.’’

Said Wilpon: “Having two great franchises from the state is something that we’re really excited about,’’ Wilpon said. “I’ve bothered, badgered, pleaded with Commissioner Bettman for years to have this event here. Thank you for finally allowing us to host it.’’

Aug 19

Montero Solid Again; Flores Has Superb Effort

Rafael Montero is finally showing signs of getting it. Tonight’s outing against the Marlins encored a strong six-inning effort – only two runs – against the Yankees.

MONTERO: Another strong start. (AP)

         MONTERO: Another strong start. (AP)

That’s two of at least six innings, and seven over all that he’s worked into the sixth.

Montero’s recent success stems from working inside with his fastball to set up his change-up away. Montero also worked quickly and ahead in the count, two things he failed to do in previous years when he struggled.

“He pitched in and had good movement on his fastball,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “That’s why he got so many ground balls. We’ve been preaching to him to pound the strike zone.’’

Montero has made significant improvement, enough to where he could fit into their future plans.

Working with Kevin Plawecki, who caught him at Las Vegas, Montero gave up one run on six hits with three walks and five strikeouts in six innings to win his second game and first at Citi Field, 8-1.

Montero said his sinker was working which resulted in him getting four double plays.

If all five of the Mets vaunted starters are healthy next year, Montero could be used as a long reliever.

FLORES AT THIRD: Wilmer Flores made a diving stop of a hard-hit ball by Marcell Ozuna in the first inning to possibly save a run. He also started three double-plays.

Although he’s not Graig Nettles, Flores has always played third base reasonably well. If the Mets are looking for answers for 2018, I’d like to see them finish the season with Flores at third.

Flores also hit his 15th homer, a two-run blast in the Mets’ seven-run sixth inning. Nine of those homers have come against right-handed pitching.

I’ve long been a Flores supporter, something GM Sandy Alderson is not. I want to play Flores full time, and I can see a contender wanting him.

In addition to Flores, Plawecki also hit a two-run homer, and Dominic Smith hit his first Citi Field homer. Perhaps more important than the homer was Smith drew his first career walk.

LEADOFF HITTER: Another thing to look at is their leadoff hitter. Tonight it was Brandon Nimmo, who went 1-for-4. His .380 on-base percentage definitely works in his favor.

If not Nimmo, I’d like to see Amed Rosario get a shot. With his speed, if he walks more he could be a 50-stolen base candidate. Rosario hitting first, with Nimmo second to protect him, the Mets could have something special.

However, for Rosario to be an effective leadoff hitter he must improve his on-base percentage (it’s only .256).

EXTRA INNINGS: The Mets tied a franchise record by turning five double plays. … Jeurys Familia threw 25 pitches in a scoreless inning in his second rehab appearance. … Curtis Granderson went 0-for-4, but reached on an error and scored the first run in the Dodgers’ victory over Detroit. … Smith has hit safely in five of his first nine major league games. … The win was the Mets’ 54th of the season. Conversely, the Dodgers are 53 games over .500.

 

Aug 17

What’s Wrong With Matz?

Steven Matz insists he’s fine, but a lot of Mets pitchers have said the same thing. Maybe he’s not feeling that biting pain in his elbow or ache in his shoulder, but something isn’t right.

Recovering from surgery, and he’s had several, there could be a dead arm period. If so, he’s either denying it, hiding it or foolishly attempting to pitch through it. Each of those decisions is bad.

Seven poor starts in a row for five straight losses in the decisions column say either something is wrong with his arm or he’s not the pitcher the Mets envision him to be.

If the Yankees light him up tonight, which is a highly likely scenario considering opponents are hitting .386 against him at Citi Field, which translates into a 9.33 ERA, then maybe the Mets would be wise to give him an MRI and rest him for a start or two.

What would it hurt?