Mar 04

March 4, Mets-Astros Lineups

Eric Young, who hasn’t played this spring for the New York Mets because of tightness in a side muscle, is in the lineup in left field and leading off this afternoon against Houston in Port St. Lucie.

However, first basemen Ike Davis (calves) and Lucas Duda (legs), and infielders Ruben Tejada and Wilfredo Tovar (hamstring), remain sidelined and listed day-to-day.

Zack Wheeler will make his first appearance of the spring and is to go two innings or 30 pitches.

Here’s today’s lineups for the Mets and Astros:

METS

Eric Young, lf

Chris Young, cf

Curtis Granderson, rf

Brandon Allen, 1b

Josh Satin, 3b

Travis d’Arnaud, c

Taylor Teagarden, dh

Anthony Seratelli, ss

Omar Quintanilla, 2b

 

Zack Wheeler, rhp

HOUSTON

Dexter Fowler, cf

Jose Altuve, 2b

Marc Krauss, rf

Chris Carter, dh

Jesus Guzman, 1b

Carlos Corporan, c

L.J. Hoes, lf

Jonathan Villar, ss

Cesar Izturis, 3b

 

Rudy Owens, lhp

Aug 13

Mets May Trade Scott Hairston Before September 1st

Ken Davidoff of the New York Post writes:

The Mets have yet to place Scott Hairston on waivers this month, according to an industry source, which makes sense. It figures that the Mets want to reap the benefits of Hairston for a while longer before putting him through the waivers process, at which time they’ll have a decision to make.

That time will come by Aug. 31, and really, the Mets’ decision should be simple. If they want to send the correct message to their fans, they’ll trade the righty-hitting outfielder.

The Mets must cease worrying about small goals such as finishing at .500 or better, or keeping their fans mildly interested through the regular season. Given where they are in their development — in need of myriad key pieces — they need to think about a bigger picture.

And Hairston is the one player whose value could be maximized at this juncture of the season.

Of course we should trade him, but as far as getting max value for him, that ship sailed when Alderson told teams he wanted one of their top three organizational prospects for him.

Because of his unrealistic and preposterous stance he blew a golden opportunity to help the team fill anyone of a dozen different sore spots.

The areas this team needs help in have doubled under his tenure and even something as basic as one everyday outfielder is nowhere on the horizon.

Now, he’ll end up trading Hairston to the lowest bidder instead of the highest bidder because that’s how waivers works. It’s just another blunder in a season full of them for this front office.

But what really irks me is the comment Alderson made alluding to the fact that Hairston had priced himself out of the Mets plans for 2013. You say that, and know that, and yet you STILL hung onto him because you feared the team needed him more than the return we could have gotten for him? Smart, real smart….

Go ahead and trade him now for the next Chris Carter…

Unreal…

Dec 03

Letting Carter go explains a lot.

The decision to let Chris Carter go explains a lot about both the past and present regimes of the Mets.

Just to save a few dollars, the Mets traded Billy Wagner to Boston for Carter late in the 2009 season. The option would have been to pay out the balance of the contract, offer him arbitration and collect the compensatory draft choices when he declined.

Those draft picks would look good now for a team with a myriad of holes.

Then GM Omar Minaya didn’t want to take that gamble because of the fear Wagner might accept and saddle the Mets with a bad contract, albeit for one season. That fear was instilled in large part from pressure from the Wilpons to save money.

What Minaya didn’t realize, and therefore couldn’t relay to the Wilpons, was Wagner understood the Mets were a sinking ship and wouldn’t have wanted to come back anyway. In hindsight, the prudent decision would have been to pay out Wagner for 2009 and gamble on arbitration.

Tbat brings us to Sandy Alderson and the decision to cut ties with Carter.

There’s still pressure to save money where ever possible as the 2011 contract for Carter would be at least $200,000 (60 percent of last year’s contract) plus the minor league contract. Alderson can bring Carter back at a reduced rate in a new split contract.

The pressure is on Carter to accept because with Fernando Martinez (assuming he’s healthy) and Lucas Duda, the Mets already have left-handed bats off the bench.

Carter was productive as a pinch-hitter, but he’s strictly a one-dimensional player in that his defense and throwing are weak.

Alderson knows Carter doesn’t bring much to the table, at least not more than Martinez or Duda, so why pay the extra money that’s needed for a franchise that wants to pinch pennies?

Sep 01

Tonight’s lineup at Braves

Interesting lineup tonight in Atlanta with both Jose Reyes and Angel Pagan not playing because of injuries.

Tonight will be Lucas Duda’s debut as the Mets are going younger. Duda’s reputation is that he can punish the ball, and power is something this team desperately needs.

Also, Josh Thole, who has good bat control will bat second. I don’t envision this being a permanent spot in the batting order for him, but the more information the better, especially in games when Pagan might hit third.

Here’s tonight’s lineup:

Luis Castillo, 2B

Josh Thole, C

David Wright, 3B

Chris Carter, RF

Carlos Beltran, CF

Ike Davis, 1B

Lucas Duda, LF

Ruben Tejada, SS

Mike Pelfrey, RP

Aug 25

Mets Chat Room; what’s to build on?

Game #126 vs. Marlins

Jerry Manuel still thinks this team can put a run together, and for the most will manage that way for the rest of the season. It is why Hisanori Takahashi is being looked at as a closer before Bobby Parnell. It is we’re not seeing Nick Evans or Chris Carter, but more of Jeff Francoeur.

At 63-62, the Mets are sure to eclipse last season’s 70-92, but the real goal is .500 or better. You see, Manuel has pride and it’s important to him to go out this year with a winning record. Not for the next job interview, because he’s already had two shots.

When a season is reduced to statistical goals, such as 30 homers for David Wright, 20 for Ike Davis and 15 wins for Mike Pelfrey it is about salvaging lost dreams and hopes.

And, that hot streak that has never come? If it does, maybe it will be a reminder of when the dreams were fresh.