Jun 09

Meet The New Mets: Never Bad Idea To Take Pitching

There are no guarantees in the baseball draft, but selecting power arms is generally a good idea, which was the Mets’ thinking when they used their first two picks to take junior pitchers Justin Dunn of Boston College with the 19th overall selection, and left-hander Anthony Kay of Connecticut 12 picks later.

You might wonder why a team struggling offensively and pitching rich would go after more pitching. Quite simply, we’re talking about Dunn and Kay not being ready for up to three more years, and a lot can happen in that span.

(05/31/2016 Chestnut Hill, MA) Boston College pitcher Justin Dunn throws in the bullpen as the BC baseball team prepares for the NCAA tournament  at  practice at Shea Field on Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Photo by Matt West.

(05/31/2016 Chestnut Hill, MA) Boston College pitcher Justin Dunn throws in the bullpen as the BC baseball team prepares for the NCAA tournament at practice at Shea Field on Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Photo by Matt West.

From the Mets’ current staff, there are injuries and trades, not to mention free agency. Of course, the way things have been going for him, you could exclude from that mix Bartolo Colon, who gave up one run in seven innings Thursday in Milwaukee.

Also, as the Mets proved with Yoenis Cespedes last year, hitting is generally more easily obtainable.

The 6-2, 184-pound Dunn started the college season in the bullpen, but his 90-mph., plus fastball and power curveball were moved into the rotation in April and went 3-1 with a 1.34 ERA in eight starts.

However, what the Mets should really love is he struck out 49 and walked just 13 in 47 innings.

“I try to pitch in the range of 90-92,” Dunn told The Boston Globe. “That’s where mentally I’d like to think I’m pitching. If it comes out harder than that, it comes out harder than that. Lately, it has been, which is a blessing. I feel pretty confident in all four pitches. That’s what makes it so hard for hitters. A hitter in a 1-and-2 count can’t eliminate one.”

Dunn throws a two- and four-seam fastball, curveball, slider and changeup. Dunn, who is from Long Island, will be pitching this weekend to send the Eagles into the College World Series.

Kay is also from Long Island and from the same high school that produced Steven Matz.

KAY: Following Matz to Queens. (UCONN)

KAY: Following Matz to Queens. (UCONN)

Kay throws in the low 90s and throws a fastball, changeup and curve.

UConn coach Jim Penders says Kay has a Long Island swagger, and you know what he means by that when you watch Matz.

“`It has kind of grown since I left Long Island,” Kay told The Hartford Courant. “It means you don’t care what anybody thinks about you – you just go out and do your job and get it done the best you can.”

Kay was 5-2 with a 2.48 ERA and 84 strikeouts in 83.1 innings.

The Mets drafted Kay in 2013 and made him a six-figure offer, but he opted for college. They got a second chance Thursday.