Apr 19

Emaus DFA’d; tonight’s line-up.

The Brad Emaus era didn’t last long, as the Mets gave their Rule 5 second base man just 37 at-bats  (.162 with one RBI) to prove himself. Emaus must go through Rule 5 waivers before being offered back to Toronto for half the claiming price worth $25,000. If he clears, the Mets could trade for him and send him to the minor leagues.

EMAUS: We hardly knew you.

I don’t believe the Mets gave Emaus a fair enough shake, with 37 at-bats barely a glimpse. The decision tends to refute the notion the Mets are using 2011 as a throw-away, stop-gap season.

Replacing Emaus will be Justin Turner, who was hitting .300 (12-for-40) with one RBI at Triple-A Buffalo.

The promotion of Turner could open a second base platoon with Daniel Murphy.

Turner is in the line-up, batting eighth in tonight’s game against Houston.

 

Here’s the line-up:

Jose Reyes, SS

Josh Thole, C

David Wright, 3B

Carlos Beltran, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

Angel Pagan, CF

Willie Harris, LF
Justin Turner, 2B

Jon Niese, LP

The Mets must make a roster move Thursday to clear room for outfielder Jason Bay’s activation from the disabled list. Most likely reliever Ryota Igarashi will be send down.

 

Apr 17

Pelfrey spits bit again; Gee gets start today.

Did you notice how when Terry Collins pulled Mike Pelfrey last night that he never spoke with his pitcher. In fact, he stood a few feet away.

PELFREY: Another rough night.

It’s hard to picture a more glaring display of disgust. Reminds me of how Pelfrey turned his back on Jerry Manuel last season. What goes around, comes around, I guess.

Collins’ words later, complete with a glazed over look in his eyes, of things getting better rang hollow, pretty much like his team’s peformance.

Two doubleheader losses in three days will do it for a manager.

After sleeping on it, I still can’t figure out what Daniel Murphy was thinking as he took off for third base. It’s one thing to try to make things happen. It’s another to not have a clue.

The Mets try to avoid their eighth straight loss this afternoon and pull out of the third worst start in franchise history. To give you an idea of how dismal things are, only the 1962 and 1964 teams began their schedules with more futility.

It begins with pitching and Pelfrey has done nothing to fortify his supposed role as ace. After four starts, his ERA stands at a robust 9.72. Pelfrey said must get better, which is a pretty generous assessment.

Overall, Mets’ starters have a 6.29 ERA and averaging 5.1 innings a start, which of course, won’t get it done. During the losing streak the staff ERA is 5.86, while the offense is averaging just over three runs a game while hitting .213.

Today’s hope is Dillon Gee, who’ll replace Chris Young, who was placed on the DL with biceps tendinitis.

Here’s this afternoon’s lineup at Atlanta:

Jose Reyes, SS

Josh Thole, C

David Wright, 3B

Carlos Beltran, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

Angel Pagan, CF

Willie Harris, LF

Brad Emaus, 2B

Dillon Gee, RP

LINEUP COMMENTS: Interesting to see Thole elevated to second. Theoretically, Thole’s bat control and command of the strikezone should help Jose Reyes, while it is hoped by dropping Pagan will add punch to the middle of the order. The Mets are at the position where it doesn’t hurt to try.

 

Apr 14

It’s looking like the same old Mets.

We’ve heard this before.

If you didn’t know the words belonged to Terry Collins, you’d swear they were Jerry Manuel’s or Willie Randolph’s.

COLLINS: Reading from Jerry and Willie's script.

Collins held a brief team meeting after last night’s latest loss and told his players, “we’re one pitch away, one swing away from being 9-2, and we’re not.’’

In some form or another, they are the words from a manager of a losing team. His players don’t make that pitch, or connect on that swing, because they aren’t good enough collectively to do so.

Last night the bad pitch was thrown by Jon Niese, but the decision to throw it was made by Collins, who let the lefthander work to Troy Tulowitzki with first base open resulting in a three-run homer.

The offense struggled again as the Mets dropped to 4-7.

“Well, we’re answering the same questions every night,’’ lamented Collins. “It’s time to start making pitches. It’s time to start getting a big two-out hit.’’

R.A. Dickey and Chris Capuano go in today’s doubleheader in which the Mets wrap up their brief homestand before heading to Atlanta, where they rarely do well.

A doubleheader with no day off following will undoubtedly tax an already worn bullpen, something the Mets don’t need before facing the Braves.

Long forgotten was the Mets’ 3-1 start, as they have gone 1-6 since. However, didn’t we expect this, and wasn’t it a matter of time before we heard those words from Collins?

Here’s the Mets’ line-up in Game 1:

Jose Reyes, SS

Daniel Murphy, 2B

David Wright, 3B

Ike Davis, 1B

Angel Pagan, CF

Willie Harris, LF

Scott Hairston, RF

Josh Thole, C

RA Dickey, RP

Apr 10

Beltran has stud night; Young pitches today.

I admit, after Beltran’s big night my first thought was July and if he stays healthy the Mets would be in better position to make a deal at the trade deadline. I am under no illusions Beltran will return next season, even if he stays healthy, has a big year and the Mets are competitive.

BELTRAN: Has big night.

The Mets’ financial and legal situation will remain the backdrop for this season, and it will be that way until it is resolved.

That being said, it is a good sign he’s swinging the bat well, and I liked how the Mets came back and added runs last night. The Mets are a .500 team after eight games, showing signs of progress one day and their most glaring weaknesses the next.

If it remains that way, it will be a maddening, and yet a fascinating summer. There will be moments and perhaps long stretches of alert aggressive baseball and also times when their pitching gets torched and the bats fall silent with RISP. It is always that way with developing teams.

As far as Beltran is concerned, if he produces the only things that would prevent the Mets from making a deal in July would be his contract and if the team is surprisingly competitive. If, by chance, they are in contention they might keep him in the hopes of making a run.

That, of course, is wishful thinking, but isn’t that the way when one follows the Mets.

Meanwhile, Chris Young goes this afternoon. He was impressive in his first start and if he keeps giving the Mets six solid innings he’ll be fine. In this comeback season that’s about all the Mets can count on from him. So far, the Mets will take what they’ve gotten from Young and last night’s starter Chris Capuano.

The Mets go for their third series win this afternoon with this line-up:

Jose Reyes, SS

Willie Harris, LF

David Wright, 3B

Ike Davis, 1B

Angel Pagan, CF

Lucas Duda, RF

Brad Emaus, 2B

Josh Thole, C

Chris Young, RP

 

Apr 03

Niese sharp against Marlins; Dickey goes for series win.

The way things started last night for Jon Niese, I didn’t expect him to last long, set alone give up only one hit in the next six innings.

NIESE: Sharp last night.

That upside I mentioned yesterday about Niese? Well, we saw it last night.  He was a definite bright spot. So was David Wright, who drove in two runs with a homer and single.

 

With Jason Bay down and the Carlos Beltran on the mend, the Mets need a good start from Wright.

Beltran, meanwhile, scored from first on a double by Ike Davis. He also doesn’t seem to have any problems moving in the outfield.

I like how the Mets came back from the first inning and after Francisco Rodriguez blew a save opportunity in the ninth. There was no sign of a fragile confidence.

Other good impressions after the first two games:

* Everybody is hustling. No malingerers in the batting box.

* Brad Emaus has looked comfortable at second.

* There’s pep in Jose Reyes’ step.

The Mets go for the series win this afternoon behind R.A. Dickey.

Here’s the batting order:

Jose Reyes, SS

Willie Harris, LF

David Wright, 3B

Ike Davis, 1B

Angel Pagan, CF

Lucas Duda, RF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Josh Thole, C

R.A. Dickey, RP