Mar 30

Maybe Harvey’s Poor Spring Comes From Lack Of Work

Matt Harvey might not be pitching to midseason form, but his attitude has a July feel. Harvey’s poor pitching this spring continued Wednesday when he gave up a three-run homer to Washington’s Ryan Zimmerman, and after the game didn’t talk to reporters.

HARVEY: Had poor spring. (Getty)

HARVEY: Had poor spring. (Getty)

Reportedly, he didn’t like the coverage of his bladder treatment, and this is how he decided to handle it.

I’ll just say: If Harvey really wants to be considered an ace, then he needs to understand aces have a responsibility to talk with the media. And, if he’s as smart as he thinks he is, he had to know he would be asked how he felt considering his medical issue. It comes with the territory of being a star.

Real aces would understand. Anyway, Harvey has pitched like anything but a star.

His 1-2 record and 7.50 ERA is irrelevant. However, in 12 innings he’s given up 10 hits and nine walks for a 1.83 WHIP. Hitters are batting .302 against him. And, let’s not forget the six runs he gave up in a minor league game against the Cardinals.

“You can say whatever you want; it’s still spring training,” manager Terry Collins told reporters. “We’ll worry about how he throws the ball on Sunday night.”

So, what’s Harvey’s problem? All indications are his arm is fine, but he’s only pitched in four exhibition games. Normally, a starter would get six starts and work 30 innings. Perhaps, in an effort to protect Harvey, the Mets didn’t give him enough work.

Just a thought.

 

 

Mar 16

Interesting Fallout Created With Tejada Cut

When St. Louis shortstop Jhonny Peralta injured his left thumb there was immediate speculation the Cardinals would make a run at the Mets’ Ruben Tejada. It was thought the Mets might hang on to him after Asdrubal Cabrera hurt his knee, but that thinking was quickly dashed.

With Tejada clearing waivers and subsequently waived Wednesday, the initial thought of Tejada to the Cardinals seems like a slam dunk now since they don’t have to give up any players.

Another possibility, which would be the ultimate irony are the Los Angeles Dodgers with their shortstop Corey Seager is currently out with a knee injury and might not be ready for Opening Day.

With Cabrera possibly opening the season on the disabled list, and Tejada now gone, Wilmer Flores could be the Opening Day shortstop for the Mets. This scenario also opens the way for Matt Reynolds and Eric Campbell making the Opening Day roster, something nobody could have anticipated.

 

Mar 12

No Concerns About Colon Or Matz

On Saturday, the Cardinals took it to Bartolo Colon, and the day before the Nationals did likewise to Steven Matz. There’s no reason for the Mets to be concerned about either because there is still two weeks to go before the start of the season. There’s still plenty of time for both to get ready.

Colon gave up four runs on six hits in 3.2 innings. He’s been through this before.

“I feel healthy,” Colon told reporters through an interpreter, and isn’t that the most important thing? “Unfortunately, the way I pitched today, they gave me a little bit of a rough time and it wasn’t great. I thought I was throwing it where I wanted to, but the batters were about to get me. They took advantage”

These things happen. As long as Colon is not hurting, he’ll be fine.

Control was also the issue with Matz, as it often is the case with young pitchers early in spring training. Matz walked the first two batters he faced in the third, then gave up a single to load the bases. He threw 41 pitches in two-plus innings, but 27 were for strikes. Actually, that’s not too bad a ratio.

“I don’t think you ever care for walks,” Matz said Friday. I just got a little erratic there. It’s still early. … I felt good. I really wanted to stay in there and try to work out of that.”

The first thing pitchers want to accomplish early in spring training, and both Colon and Matz were making their second starts, is to be healthy, and that’s not an issue for either. Control, especially of breaking pitches, takes a few starts.

Healthwise, both are on schedule. There’s nothing for the Mets to be concerned about now.

 

 

Mar 10

Syndergaard Makes Us Wonder How High His Ceiling Can Be

It was just Noah Syndergaard‘s first exhibition start for the Mets, but you can’t help but wonder what his upside could be. Could it be higher than that of Matt Harvey or Jacob deGrom? Syndergaard gave us a glimpse last year, but every time he takes the mound he has us wanting more.

SYNDERGAARD: How high is the ceiling? (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: How high is the ceiling? (AP)

“There’s always a debate about who’s going to be the best,” Mets manager Terry Collins told reporters. “This kid’s got a chance to be the guy.”

Harvey and deGrom breezed in their exhibition starts. Syndergaard put down the first eight Cardinals, gave up a hit, then got out of the third without a run. Syndergaard cruised.

Perhaps the reason for our attraction or interest in Syndergaard is how hard he throws. He was sitting on 98 mph. consistently today. When he really lets it loose, he’s over 100 mph. Harvey and deGrom put it in the high 90s, but 100 is a special number for a pitcher.

That’s Nolan Ryan territory, and he dominated until his 40s before his arm gave out.

“I felt great out there,” Syndergaard told reporters. “It’s just nice getting out there and getting your feet wet. I was a little amped up. It’s been a long wait to get on the mound, and to be able to get out there and compete. But, overall, l I think it was a pretty solid performance. There are a few things I’d like to continue to work on, just to make the game easier than it can be.”

The caveat, of course, is staying healthy. Harvey, deGrom, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler have all had Tommy John surgery. Syndergaard thinks about the same happening to him – a lot.

“I’ve thought about it quite a bit,” Syndergaard said. “But, I trust myself to put my body in the right situations to be able to perform at a healthy level.”

And, a healthy Syndergaard makes us wonder just how high that level can be.

 

Aug 08

Want Mets To Go For The Throat

Let’s not have any of this wild card talk, it’s up to the Mets to go for the throat, and as Bob Murphy once so eloquently said, “win the damn thing.’’

For the first time in franchise history, the Mets overcame deficits in each of the last three innings to beat Tampa Bay last night.

MURPHY: ``Win the damn thing.'' (Mets)

MURPHY: “Win the damn thing.” (Mets)

It was an effort manager Terry Collins correctly labeled “pure character,’’ as the Mets increased their winning streak to seven straight.

Noah Syndergaard takes the ball tonight with the objective of putting the Mets games over .500, where they were when they won 11 straight games.

The Mets have won 18 of their 59 games – tied for eighth with the game’s best record – in those two winning streaks. It’s numbers like those that win pennants.

With things going their way and their lead over the Nationals now up to 2.5 games, the Mets want to win this thing going away as to avoid the wild-card play-in scenario and to set their rotation as they please. Honestly, I never thought I would write those words this year.

If the season ended today, the Mets, Cardinals and Dodgers would be the division winners and Pittsburgh and Chicago would be the wild cards.

Things frequently fluctuate this time of year and there’s so much more of the season to be played. The Mets are starting their push down the stretch at a good time, and they are gradually improving on some important team stats. They’ve now won four straight on the road to improve to 21-32 (still the worse among those National League teams that would qualify for the postseason) and their runs differential is now plus-16.

In addition, Lucas Duda is hitting homers; David Wright could begin a rehab-assignment on Monday; and the team was energized by the acquisitions of Yoenis Cespedes, Tyler Clippard, Kelly Johnson and Juan Uribe.

The Mets still have issues, including their bullpen (which is always critical in the playoffs), but as they were in April they are again a thrill to watch.

But, let’s not have them be content with playing well, but let’s have this be like the college football rankings and go heavy on the style points. Let’s have them put this away and “win the damn thing.’’