Jul 14

Mets Should Consider Internal Bullpen Options

As erratic as their hitting has been – and even with the uncertainty surrounding Yoenis Cespedes’ return – the Mets’ primary need at the trade deadline is pitching.

EDGIN: What about him? (AP)

EDGIN: What about him? (AP)

A strong argument can be made for adding bullpen depth. Addison Reed and Jeurys Familia have been a solid eighth-ninth combination, but the bridge to them is shaky at best.

Jerry Blevins has pitched better lately, but Antonio Bastardo has been a bust and Hansel Robles is too erratic.

Mike Puma of The New York Post suggests San Diego’s Brad Hand, Oakland’s John Axford and Chris Withrow of the Braves. They probably won’t cost much, but before thinking trade, the Mets should look internally until the trade deadline.

* Lefty Josh Edgin has recovered from surgery and has pitched well. He’s 1-1 with a 2.45 ERA in 25 appearances. He has 22 strikeouts with 12 walks. He has two saves and five holds. Since he was part of the Mets’ plans at one point and healthy now, I would think he should get the first chance.

Josh Smoker is a lefty who throws 98 mph., hard. Substitute him for Bastardo and I’ll be happy. In 39.2 innings he has 59 strikeouts and 17 walks.

Seth Lugo (3-4, 5.65 ERA) is already up here, so I’d like to see him get some meaningful opportunities.

As far as starters who could be turned into relievers, I’d look at Gabriel Ynoa and Rafael Montero.

Ynoa (9-3, 4.19) has been a solid starter for Vegas. He has good control and throws in the lower 90s. Montero (4-6, 7.20 ERA) has not pitched well in 16 starts. Something is wrong with him evidenced by a 1.89 WHIP. Perhaps he’s one of those pitchers where the hitters catch up to him the second and third times around the batting order. Maybe it is time to consider him out of the bullpen.

The bullpen is suspect now, but there could be some answers within the system. Worth a try.

 

Jun 29

Mets Selling Team Memorabilia Shameful

First, it was Mike Piazza‘s game-worn jersey from the night of his post 9-11 homer against the Braves that went up for auction. Now, it is his helmet. What next, his jock?

Then again, we shouldn’t be surprised. People will buy anything, and if you read the Joe DiMaggio biography you will realize how corrupt and sleazy the sports memorabilia industry can be.

iSeveral Mets minority owners purchased the jersey for $365,000 and display it on a rotating basis at the Mets’ Hall of Fame at Citi Field, the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, and the September 11 Museum in Lower Manhattan. All good places.

Goldin Auctions will accept bids for the helmet unless another white knight rides in. The auction house said ten percent of the sale price will be donated to Tuesday’s Children, a charity supporting first responders.

The Mets were blistered over the jersey and deservedly so. They should be torched for the helmet. They should be singled out every time this happens, and you know it will. The team issued a statement to ESPN: “This item was sold in 2013. In April this year, we instituted a new process with internal controls to prevent something like this from happening again in the future.”

The “what next?” question is a legitimate one. Surely, the Mets have a list of the items they sold – and for what price – to collectors, if for no other reason to report on their taxes. The Mets do pay taxes, don’t they?

To sell memorabilia, especially of a sensitive nature as the post 9-11 variety is cold, callous and totally disregards their history. I’d like to know what other items the Mets sold off to pay down their Ponzi scheme losses.

It is shameful it came to this. Major League Baseball has enough policies, but it would be good to institute a blanket rule no franchise can secretly sell off its history. If a team won’t donate it to Cooperstown or display it in its own museum, it should be given to the player involved.

It shouldn’t that hard, but for the Mets and Major League Baseball, it always is.

Jun 26

Mets Not Good Enough To Not Hustle

The Mets are a good team, but let’s be clear, they aren’t so good to where they can get away not hustling. Reports are manager Terry Collins gave Alejandro De Aza “an earful,” as The New York Post so eloquently put it for his inexcusable play Saturday night.

De Aza failed to get down a bunt, which is bad enough but compounded his failure by not hustling, and the play was subsequently turned into a double play in the tenth inning.

DE AZA: Not good enough to skate. (AP)

DE AZA: Not good enough to skate. (AP)

“I’ve seen [De Aza] play, and the one thing he is known for is how hard he plays,” Collins told reporters. “But it goes to show you — everybody gets frustrated when they don’t do the job.”

I don’t want to hear it.

Doing your job is to hustle even when you screw up. Getting frustrated is not a viable reason, but an excuse. Not buying it, and I don’t want to hear anything from De Aza saying he thought the ball was caught.

The bottom line is he wasn’t thinking. Or, maybe he could have been thinking since the Mets are a team built on power his mistake would be erased by the long ball. Could that idea have been planted into De Aza’s head by Collins, who says the Mets are a team built on the home run and we don’t bunt, or steal, or hit-and-run?

What I haven’t heard is whether Collins gave Yoenis Cespedes an earful for not hustling in consecutive games and getting caught on the bases. He won’t because Cespedes is supposedly a big star and big stars in all sports are given a long leash when is comes to not hustling.

On Friday, Cespedes was picked off first when he didn’t dive trying to get back to the bag and twisted his ankle. Last night, he was thrown out at second standing up. Go figure. The FOX announcers suggested Cespedes didn’t slide because of his ankle, which is unbelievably lame on several counts.

First, slide headfirst which is what everybody does these days. Second, if his ankle is so bad he shouldn’t have played. They could have delayed sending Michael Conforto down for a day. Or they could have played Matt Reynolds as they did earlier in the week. Or Kelly Johnson, who cleaned up for De Aza with a pinch-hit homer in the 11th inning.

Players play hurt all the time, but if the pain prevents him from doing his job, perhaps he shouldn’t be in the lineup and spend a couple of weeks on the disabled list on the mend. Cespedes’ sore hip was an explanation for why he didn’t slide earlier this year.

Speculation is De Aza will be gone when Jose Reyes is brought up. That’s a logical assumption. Also logical to conclude is Cespedes will be gone after this season when he opts out. Maybe that went into Collins’ thinking for not airing out his center fielder.

Whatever the reasons for not hustling by either player and Collins presumably letting Cespedes skate, they aren’t good enough.

And, the Mets aren’t good enough to get away with not hustling.

Jun 17

Wright Injury, Lack Of Offense, Could Force Mets To Deal Harvey

I don’t know if we’ll see David Wright will play again for the Mets. I would hope so, but one never knows.

However, what we can be reasonably sure of is we’ll likely never see the Wright who hit at least 26 homers and drove in 100 runs five times in a six-year stretch.

HARVEY: What could he bring in return? (AP)

HARVEY: What could he bring in return? (AP)

The Mets haven’t been hitting for the better part of the last six weeks. Wright and Lucas Duda are on the disabled list. Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes are starting to show breakout signs after being in lengthy slumps.

Don’t forget both Cespedes and Neil Walker can leave after this season. And, we don’t know if the Mets will need to replace Wright, but they will need to add offense. Let’s not limit the offense to power, but the ability to hit with RISP.

Catcher, first base, second base, third base and an outfielder will be on GM Sandy Alderson’s shopping list this winter, and not all of those voids will be filled by free agency.

Given that, it might be time explore dealing one of their young arms. They dealt Zack Wheeler along with Wilmer Flores for Carlos Gomez, but that fell apart.

Once again, this leads to speculation they might be willing to part with Friday’s starter, Matt Harvey, who was so-so against Atlanta after three consecutive strong starts.

Harvey, who worked six innings against the Braves, will be a free agent after the 2018 season. He’s making over $4.3 million this year and is arbitration eligible after the next two seasons, so he has a reasonable contract.

With Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz in the rotation, Wheeler on the disabled list, and the recently drafting pitchers Justin Dunn of Boston College and Anthony Kay of UConn, the Mets seem in good shape with their starting pitching.

And, with the belief his agent, Scott Boras, won’t seek to negotiate early and won’t leave money on the table – the recent deal signed by Steven Strasburg notwithstanding – this might be the time to deal Harvey in need of offense.

That Harvey has pitched well in three of his last four starts _ he gave up four runs in six inning Friday – and has shown he’s healthy after undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2013 enhances his value.

Depending how the remainder of the season shakes out, dealing Harvey might be something to explore. Seriously.

 

Jun 04

Hoping Flores’ Opportunity Is Legit

I am on record as being an advocate of Wilmer Flores long before the tears. He’ll be getting his second straight start Saturday in Miami as David Wright‘s replacement at third base. Here’s hoping this opportunity is legitimate.

FLORES: Be patient. (Getty)

FLORES: Be patient. (Getty)

By that, I mean if he goes hitless for two or three games that he goes out there for a fourth game. He played a lot last year when Wright was injured and Terry Collins needs to keep him in the lineup now. It has to be Flores’ job to lose.

Pulling him after a week for Eric Cambell or Ty Kelly isn’t a good idea. If they can pull off a solid trade now, go for it, but it really is too soon for a major trade.

I floated several trade options Friday, among them getting Kelly Johnson back from the Braves, Milwaukee’s Aaron Hill, San Diego’s Yangervis Solarte or the Angels’ Yunel Escobar. All are making more than Flores, but honestly, are any of them that far superior they should get the job instead?

Probably not.

It is also premature to move Neil Walker off second base and bring up Dilson Herrera. The latter has done nothing to prove he’s more deserving of a full time shot than Flores.

The Mets will never learn of Flores’ true abilities – and value – if he’s not given a long-term opportunity. If he’s not adding something offensively by the All-Star break, then explore other options before the trade deadline.

If the Mets appear too eager now in the trade market, they could overpay, so it’s in their best interests to stay with Flores right now.

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