Sep 04

Red Sox Doing Valentine Wrong

Whether you like him or not, you have to admit Bobby Valentine is getting a raw deal in Boston. Big deal owner John Henry said Valentine’s job is safe through this season. If ownership really wanted to send a message to that dysfunctional clubhouse the Red Sox need to extend Valentine’s deal through at least next year.

Management put Valentine in an impossible position when the hired him by giving him that toxic clubhouse. The Red Sox helped themselves with that trade, getting rid of over $200 million is salary and clubhouse cancer Josh Beckett.

With all their payroll flexibility, they can add several good pieces and Valentine should get the chance to work with them. It would be unfair to sack him. It is even more unfair to let him twist in the wind. If there’s any chance he won’t be back, they should do it now.

But, if they did, it would be giving in the inmates for the second straight year.

 

Jun 18

Mets Begin Week With Down Note; Jason Bay On Concussion DL

If the disabled list was a place of residence rather than a simple list, Jason Bay should be paying taxes there. He’s on the concussion DL this time after his hitting his head against the left field wall attempting to make a diving catch over the weekend series against the Reds.

RAMIREZ: Just say no.

In which they were swept, by the way.

Bay’s nightmare tenure with the Mets continues, and Terry Collins didn’t discount the idea he might be done for the season. Yes, Bay has underperformed with the Mets, but nobody – at least no right thinking person – wants to see an injury. However, should this be the case, it opens up an even greater opportunity for Kirk Neiuwenhuis, who figured to lose playing time with Bay’s return.

The most amusing thing I read all weekend were those comments advocating the Mets sign Manny Ramirez. Getting Ramirez was a bad idea years ago because of the talent it would require to land this clubhouse cancer. It’s a bad idea now because he’s remained a cancer, but one who can’t hit.

At one time Ramirez was a skilled hitter, but we must remember he’s failed three PED tests. And, he’s always been a head case, often a foul tempered one. No, the Red Sox wouldn’t have won without him, but they also might have won another title had he not quit on them.

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May 15

Jason Bay’s Return Presents Dilemma To Mets

Jason Bay has begun working out in Port St. Lucie. He’s still several weeks away, but what is to become of the Mets’ outfield when he comes back?

Terry Collins said Bay will play, but not how much.

BAY: A frequent site. (Getty Images)

I don’t like the idea of Kirk Nieuwenhuis returning to the minor leagues or having his playing time substantially reduced. And, for the money the Mets are paying Bay, he will play. That’s always a factor, regardless on what the manager or GM say.

Part of what goes into Collins’ decision would be the Mets’ record at the time. If they are consistently winning and with Nieuwenhuis producing it would be deflating to sit him.

The Mets could bring Bay back slowly in a platoon role until he regains his stroke. And, I’m talking about the one he left in Boston, not his brief spurt before the injury.

Another scenario, and one more difficult to implement because of all the moving parts would be to rotate Nieuwenhuis in the outfield, playing a day in right, one in center and one in left, which would give Andres Torres and Lucas Duda a rest. It could also bury Scott Hairston on the bench. I believe this will be how Collins handles things.

I like Nieuwenhuis and he’s done nothing to warrant to be benched. Conversely, Bay’s track record is such that he doesn’t deserve the automatic fulltime insertion into the lineup.

The one thing we have learned since Bay’s injury is Nieuwenhuis represents the Mets’ future, while Bay does not.

 

Apr 24

Bay Lands On DL With Fractured Rib

Jason Bay’s disappointing tenure with the Mets took another downward turn this afternoon when he was placed on the disabled list with a fractured rib on his left side. This is a painful injury that could take a lot longer than two weeks to heal.

BAY: And the hits keep on coming (AP).

To take Bay’s spot on the roster the Mets brought up infielder Zach Lutz from Triple-A Buffalo, where he was hittingĀ .333 with three homers and 10 RBI. Meanwhile, Andres Torres began a rehab assignment last night at Single-A St. Lucie.

Lutz could give the struggling Ike Davis some time off at first base.

Bay has been in a slump in his two-plus years with the Mets after signing from Boston. There is no telling how long he’ll be out, so it’s quite possible his third year could be a wash, too. What this injury also means is it could prevent Bay from getting 500 at-bats. If he gets that many at-bats this year and next it would trigger an option, something the Mets would rather not have happen.

 

Feb 04

Mets did not win Santana trade.

I read a blog posting this morning that claimed the Mets won the Johan Santana trade, based on the talent given up, but lost the contract extension. This couldn’t be any less accurate or more naive.

SANTANA: On the hook for three more years.

While it is true the players surrendered didn’t amount to much on the major league level and Santana did have several productive years, one cannot separate the trade from the contract because they are linked. The trade was made because Santana waived his no-trade clause and agreed to a six-year extension.

Translated: There would have been no trade without the contract.

I wrote at the time the Mets overpaid for Santana both in terms of players – not that it matters now – and in money. That has proven to be correct.

The market for Santana was Boston and the Yankees, and the Mets only became involved only after both those backed off because of the Twins’ demands. When the deal was made Omar Minaya admitted Santana came back to them.

In essence, the Mets were bidding against themselves, something Minaya also did in the contracts for Francisco Rodriguez, Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo and several others.

The contract of $137.5 million over six years was excessive for Santana because of the accumulated innings on his arm and he had a previous arm injury. Six years is a gamble for any pitcher at any time because of the fragility of the arm, shoulder and elbow. Too many things can go wrong and the team ends up paying from damaged goods.

I believe, as I did then, the Mets misjudged the market and overpaid for Santana. While he did win for the Mets, he was injured at the end of every season and required surgery. The Mets already paid for one season and received nothing, and it is possible they could be on the hook for three more years.

Any trade is a gamble, but this one the Mets lost. That is, unless Santana makes a full recovery and pitches – and wins – for a pain-free three more years.

Anybody want to take that bet?