Oct 15

What Is Mets’ Interest In Their Own Free Agents?

In looking at the free-agent market, the New York Mets will first consider which of their own eight they might think of bringing back.

It isn’t an impressive list, but there are several the Mets might think of returning. If they don’t bring back they can always find their replacements in the market.

The filing period begins five days after the end of the World Series. Here’s the eight:

David Aardsma: He had some decent moments coming out of the bullpen, but nothing that screams, “we gotta have him back.’’ Aardsma was 2-2 with a 4.31 ERA in 43 appearances. He allowed 53 base runners in 39.2 innings, so we’re not exactly talking about a slam-the-door reliever. Walking 19 and giving up seven homers isn’t good for such a limited time.

Tim Byrdak: He worked 4.2 innings in eight appearances because he was coming off an injury. He pitched in 72 games two years ago, but was injured in 2012. Because of his health issues, he should come relatively cheaply and might be worth offering an incentives-laden deal. If he rejects it, the Mets haven’t lost anything.

Pedro Feliciano: He is far from “Perpetual Pedro’’ but after missing the past two seasons he did find his way into 25 games. It was too small a window to measure his effectiveness. He might be worth a shot, but the Mets must ask themselves, “can we live without him?’’ Chances are they’ll answer in the affirmative.

Frank Francisco: I mention him because he’s on the list, but there’s no way the Mets want him back. Frankly, I thought the only reason they brought him up at the end of the season was in the hope of finding a trading partner.

Aaron Harang: The Mets can pick up his option and since they are two short in the rotation, he’s somebody worth considering. He started four games for the Mets, and worked six innings in three of them. Harang struck out 26 in 23 innings, so there’s some hope there. On the flip side, he also gave up five homers among his nine runs. That he gave the Mets innings is what they should look at considering he’d be a back end of the rotation starter.

LaTroy Hawkins: He’s 40 and still throws in the mid-90s. When Bobby Parnell went down he assumed the closer role and saved 13 games. Parnell is not a certainty coming off neck surgery and constructing the bullpen is a must. Frankly, I’m not sure they would get much better in the free-agent market.

Daisuke Matsuzaka: He started seven games and went 3-3 and worked into the fifth inning is all but one game. He gave the Mets 38.2 innings when they needed it desperately. GM Sandy Alderson said he was pleased with what Matsuzaka gave them. Of the eight free agents, he’s probably the most likely to come back.

Johan Santana: He wants to pitch again and Alderson said he’d keep his mind open. He’s already received a pile of money from the Mets, and unless he accepts a minor league deal, I’d be reluctant considering his health situation.

 

Oct 14

Mets Have Few Spots Without Questions

Let’s assume for a moment the New York Mets’ health questions – outside from Matt Harvey – are answered in the positive heading into spring training. If that’s the case, then let’s look what issues the Mets’ don’t qualify as pressing.

They don’t have a lot.

As I see it, they are only three deep in their rotation with Dillon Gee, Jon Niese and Zack Wheeler. All have performance questions, but if healthy I’m not overly concerned.

Gee won 12 games last year and 15 should not be out of the question. The same goes for Niese. Who among us doesn’t expect Wheeler to pitch the way Harvey did before he was injured?

Who wouldn’t take that now?

As far as the position players are concerned, the Mets are set in just two spots, and possibly a third. David Wright, of course, and can we please stop trying to replace Daniel Murphy when there are other concerns?

I have no problem with Murphy at second base, and for that matter, I’m also fine with Eric Young in left field, primarily because he surfaced above nine other options to be a productive leadoff hitter. Yes, a high on-base percentage would be good to see, but he made things happen at the top of the order and lead the National League in stolen bases.

And, don’t forget, the Mets only had him for half a season.

The expectations are high for Juan Lagares in center, but he has too many offensive issues. The same goes for Matt den Dekker. Translation: The outfield remains a mess.

There are no answers in the minor leagues and little chips to use to trade. That means they will have to spend, but is there anybody out there that makes you salivate?

I wrote optimistically the other day about the bullpen, but that’s if everything comes together. They appear to have plenty of options to build around, but nothing concrete, especially considering Bobby Parnell’s injury. Should Parnell not come back that’s a source for serious worry.

The back end of the rotation is a concern just as it was last year before Jeremy Hefner and Gee started pitching well. They have options they could bring back and others in the minors, but there’s too much uncertainty.

First base is a black hole and catcher Travis d’Arnaud hasn’t proven he can hit, although the pitchers appear to like him and his defense is promising.

The Mets as we know them today will not be your team come Opening Day. And, that’s a positive.

Oct 13

Rebuilding Mets’ Bullpen Not Monster Task As It Has Been

In each of Sandy Alderson’s previous three winters with the New York Mets, he listed building the bullpen as a priority. It will be the same this winter as well.

Horrendous in the first half of last season, the Mets’ bullpen stabilized into respectability in the second half of the season to finish with a 3.98 ERA.

Unlike previous seasons when Alderson’s bullpen needed a complete overall, the Mets already have several slots filled, but still need to improve their overall depth.

“We need to have more quality arms in the bullpen,’’ Alderson said. “We never had a real strong bottom half of the bullpen. The key will be to have more arms, quality arms out there that we can rely on.’’

Frank Francisco was a bust as the closer, but in his place Bobby Parnell emerged as reliable in that role. However, he lost a considerable amount of weight following surgery to repair a herniated disk. Assuming Parnell returns for the start of the season, the Mets’ pen could also feature LaTroy Hawkins – as a reliable set-up reliever – Vic Black, lefty specialist Scott Rice, long man Carlos Torres, and Gonzalez Germen.

Black was acquired in the deal that sent Marlon Byrd and John Buck to Pittsburgh. He throws in the high 90s and will likely get a chance at the closer role if Parnell isn’t ready.

In previous seasons the Mets had to search for six or seven arms. As of now, they could already have six and are merely looking for depth. Their lack of depth was exposed when after Parnell was injured and Torres was temporarily moved to the rotation.

Rice and Hawkins were two feel-good stories. After spending 14 years in the minor leagues, Rice finally got his chance to play in the major leagues and appeared in 73 games. Meanwhile, the 40-year-old Hawkins still touched the radar gun at 95 mph., and when Parnell was injured, he took over the closer role and saved 13 games with a 2.93 ERA.

Germen emerged as a power arm and Torres was valuable as a combination long-man, spot-starter and situational reliever. Torres’ versatility is something the Mets’ bullpen hadn’t had since Darren Oliver in 2006.

Previously, the Mets would piece together their bullpen, but this time most of their heavy lifting has already been completed. Of course, with Matt Harvey gone for 2014, their pen stands to be taxed.

 

Sep 28

Mets Wrap: Numbers That Add To Another Loss

There are a lot of statistics to define the 2013 New York Mets. One is 40-41, the Mets’ record in games decided by two or fewer runs. The other is 32-24, their record at Citi Field after today’s 10-inning, 4-2 loss to Milwaukee.

It was the Mets’ third straight loss by a 4-2 score after winning five of six on the road. That inconsistency is also emblematic of how the Mets have played this season.

There are two ways to interpret the first statistic. With half their games decided by two runs – they are 28-28 in one-run games – the Mets have been competitive, which is an encouraging sign.

Not so encouraging is they haven’t been good enough to take the next step over the line. The 40 victories mean they’ve played well enough to stay in the game. That they’ve been that competitive is why manager Terry Collins will reportedly be offered a two-year extension.

To be that competitive considering the season-ending losses of Matt Harvey and Bobby Parnell; the lengthy injury to David Wright; the horrific lack of production from Ike Davis, Ruben Tejada and Lucas Duda; a makeshift bullpen and outfield; Jon Niese’s off-year; and the trade of Marlon Byrd and John Buck.

All that and it is a wonder their record isn’t worse.

The 41 losses indicate breakdowns in the bullpen, defensive lapses a failure to hit in the clutch, plus all of the above.

The Mets’ home record? Well, that’s just bad baseball.

Their overall record at home has been abysmal since Citi Field, and the sad thing is this year’s staff might have been the Mets’ best, even without Johan Santana.

When the Mets opened Citi Field, they moved into a cavernous stadium a promised a team build on pitching, speed and defense. Power was a fourth priority, and yet when the Mets’ needs are mentioned it always comes down to adding a power-hitting outfielder.

However, the most telling offensive stat isn’t their 130 homers – only the traded Byrd hit more than 20 – but 1,371 strikeouts. All those strikeouts add up to over 50 games without touching the ball.

Foul balls excluded.

All those strikeouts is yet another statistic that defines this summer, the Mets’ fifth straight losing season and fifth consecutive with a drop in attendance.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 22

Mets Wrap: Whether They Finish Third Or Fourth, Mets Have Plenty Of Questions

In the grand scheme, we won’t know for years to what degree finishing third or fourth will impact the New York Mets in regards to their draft position and subsequent pick. Will finishing third give them a lesser pick and deprive them of selecting the next Derek Jeter?

Nobody can project with any accuracy baseball draft picks. Even No. 1s have been busts. And, David Wright is right in his line of reasoning it really doesn’t matter where you finish if there are no playoffs?

COLLINS: One of many questions. (AP)

COLLINS: One of many questions. (AP)

However, considering the expectations, the abundance of injuries, and dreadful second-half offense which led from a slide of seven games under .500 to their current position of 13 under, finishing strong the last week, and in third, couldn’t hurt in laying the groundwork for next year.

However, whether it is third or fourth, it will not reduce the number of issues for the 2014 Mets. Sweeping the Phillies this weekend might give them a feel-good confidence heading into the offseason, but does not eliminate their immediate off-season issues:

1) How long will they string Terry Collins along, or will they do the right thing and make an announcement the day after the season finale, or that Sunday?

2) The Mets have been saying for years this is the offseason they will spend, if so, how much?

Will Matt Harvey opt for surgery or go into the season riding a gamble?

Regardless of Harvey’s decision, will the Mets add a veteran starter, because as of now they have just three plus Aaron Harang?

Is there something to worry about after Zack Wheeler was shut down for the year after tightness in his shoulder following Saturday’s start?

GM Sandy Alderson has been trying to build a bullpen for three years. Will this be a fourth?

Will they cut ties with Ike Davis or extend this torturous experiment into next spring?

Should they pass on tendering Davis a contract for 2014, how confident are they in Lucas Duda or do they need to add a first baseman?

Are they confident of Bobby Parnell’s recovery from surgery, or will they feel the need to add a closer?

Will they decide to see what they have in Ruben Tejada in spring training or add a shortstop?

Is their outfield plan to platoon Matt den Dekker and Juan Lagares in center field or have them both play in the outfield?

What is their satisfaction level with Eric Young, knowing if they replace him it will be in left field and as a leadoff hitter?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos