Oct 22

Breaking News: Mets To Name Callaway As Manager

Multiple reports are saying the Mets have named Mickey Callaway, the pitching coach of the Indians since 2013 as their new manager, beating out a huge pool of candidates.

Kevin Long, Manny Acta, Bob Geren, Robin Ventura, Joe McEwing and Alex Cora were reportedly among those GM Sandy Alderson was considering.

Callaway will replace Terry Collins, who was forced out and took a position in the team’s front office after a disastrous, injury-filled 70-92 record this season.

Like everybody else considered, Callaway represents a gamble as it remains to be seen whether Alderson reached out and got the Mets a nugget or whether he was seduced by a hot “flavor of the month.”

Callaway, 42, built the Indians’ pitching staff into one of the best as they led the majors in ERA (3.30) and strikeouts (1,614), shutouts (19), complete games (7) and finished third with an opponents’ batting average of just .236. But, don’t forget, he’s not bringing Corey Kluber, Trevor Bauer or Carlos Carrasco with him.

Among Callaway’s first priorities is getting, and keeping, the Mets’ young pitchers healthy as the Mets’ season imploded with injuries to Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler.

 

 

 

Sep 26

No Meaningful Change With Alderson In Charge

Another day, another article in The New York Post about who might manage the Mets next season. There’s a growing list of candidates now up to five whom might replace Terry Collins next year. So far, The Post is reporting the candidates are Robin Ventura, Alex Cora, current hitting coach Kevin Long, Bob Geren and Chip Hale.

ALDERSON: No meaningful change with him in control. (AP)

ALDERSON: No meaningful change with him in control. (AP)

The report says GM Sandy Alderson could make the decision to replace Collins on Monday. If Collins falls on his sword and says he’s retiring, it would save the Mets from the awkward position of having to announce the second-winningest manager in franchise history is being fired.

It would be just like Collins to be the good soldier and spare Fred Wilpon and Alderson that embarrassment. Personally, if I’m Collins, after Sunday’s game I would say I want to continue managing the Mets. Yes, put the onus on Alderson, who has gone out of his way to undermine and humiliate Collins.

Yes, Collins should make it hard on Alderson, who, in his autobiography went out of his way to criticize his manager, who has been nothing if not loyal.

The frequent criticism of Collins has been his game management, which includes the use of the bullpen, something Alderson hasn’t improved since he was hired after the 2010 season.

Game management has to include an explanation, and the most prevalent are Collins’ options on his roster.

It really doesn’t matter who is hired to manage the Mets in 2018 and beyond, because no effective change can be made in the club’s direction as long as Alderson remains general manager, because under him are the decisions on how much to spend and on what players.

We must always remember Alderson wasn’t hired to build the Mets into a contender, but to cut payroll and save the Wilpons money. He did that this season when he gutted the team in July and August, essentially leaving them to rebuild this winter.

Alderson bullied Collins on not only building the 25-man roster, but in constructing the batting order.

Alderson is big on analytics, which means he doesn’t respect old school thinking, for example, the need for speed and defense. Alderson’s tact is contradictory, for example, he places an emphasis on on-base percentage but devalues hitters taking walks.

There’s nothing wrong with some of the new-age statistics, but not at the total expense of the old-world numbers.

It is interesting to read about the Mets’ managerial candidates and wonder how the team will play next season, but you must remember there will be no meaningful change until Alderson is replaced, and Fred Wilpon won’t make that move.

Apr 10

Whose Lineup Is It Really?

GM Sandy Alderson took a not-so subtle poke at Mets manager Terry Collins the other day when he interrupted the latter’s pregame press conference and said, “Hey, Terry, here’s your lineup for tomorrow.”

Now, I’m not saying Alderson handed Collins a lineup and said, “use this,” but I do believe he’s had a lot of influence in what is put on the field.

Curtis Granderson hitting first, David Wright second, projected leadoff hitter Juan Lagares sixth and the pitcher eighth is not what was practiced during spring training, and, of course, there are questions why?

The front office routinely talks with the manager about lineups, but I doubt a manager with far more job security would accept this influence, and definitely not the ribbing Alderson gave. Bruce Bochy wouldn’t have. Neither would have Joe Torre or Tony La Russa or Sparky Anderson.

All this seems to be a jab at Collins, whom Alderson said he wasn’t supportive of in his book. How can anybody not see that? Surely, it had to make Collins uncomfortable, although he wouldn’t say anything. How could he?

The Mets’ unconventional lineup has drawn attention throughout baseball, to which Alderson told reporters: “I think what happened is people were surprised by the lineup. People don’t like surprises, whether it’s the media or fans or other people in baseball who’ve got everything figured out. So when there’s a surprise like that, people are scrambling around for some sort of rationale or explanation. Sometimes it gets a little crazy. That’s what I chalk it up to — mostly.”

That’s one or the reasons why there is spring training as teams work to avoid surprises. Why practice something and then deviate?

It makes no sense.

 

Oct 05

Will Backman Get A Chance – Anywhere?

One thing the Mets’ coaching decisions this week means is Wally Backman will likely stay at Triple-A, which is fine.

Bench coach Bob Geren didn’t do anything to warrant being replaced by Backman, or anybody else for that matter. Backman, the 2014 Pacific Coast League Manger of the Year, is not being considered for the Mets’ vacant hitting coach position, but was offered the chance to stay at Triple-A Las Vegas.

BACKMAN: Waiting (AP)

BACKMAN: Waiting (AP)

This isn’t to say Backman won’t someday deserve of an opportunity, just that currently the timing isn’t right. Terry Collins elicits a lukewarm response from most Mets’ fans, but in fairness the team is improving despite missing several key pieces.

Backman wants to manage on the major league level, and the best way to get there is to keep working at Las Vegas or get a bench job in the majors. It has been ten years since he was hired – then fired several days later – by Arizona because of his off-the-field behavior. Ten years is long enough.

In the interim, Backman is gaining valuable experience at Las Vegas and should be the primary candidate to replace Collins when the time comes.

I do have a question when it pertains to Backman: When other managerial positions open, how come nobody asks about Backman? Yes, he’s had some off-the-field issues, but is he that toxic?

Former Met Joe McEwing, currently the White Sox’s third base coach, is being considered for the openings in Texas and Arizona.

Why not Backman?

Oct 04

Analyzing Mets’ Coaching Moves

The Mets are nearly done with their major league coaching staff, bringing back pitching coach Dan Warthen, bench coach Bob Geren, third base coach Tim Teufel, first base coach Tom Goodwin and bullpen coach Ricky Bones are staying.

Reassigned elsewhere in the organization are hitting coaches Lamar Johnson and Luis Natera, as somebody had to fall on the sword for the offense’s woeful performance at times.

None of these could be considered surprises, although there’s always static when it comes to Warthen. Jacob deGrom’s rise and Zack Wheeler’s good second half went a long toward keeping him around. Also, he should get points for the development of the bullpen.

We’ll know more about Warthen next season – and manager Terry Collins for that matter – when they’ll have Matt Harvey, Wheeler and deGrom.

Just wondering, but why isn’t anybody else asking questions about why Jon Niese is still mired in mediocrity. It’s not a far out question.

I’m not saying Johnson and Natera are good hitting coaches, or bad, either. What’s really wrong with the Mets’ hitting are the players and the overall team approach.