Feb 24

No Guarantee Mets Would Have Gotten Nelson Cruz For Bargain Price

It is an oversimplification to suggest the New York Mets could have signed Nelson Cruz for the same $8 million the Orioles did, if not a little more. Especially when juxtaposed against the Chris Young signing for $7.25 million.

I was against the Young signing, but that had nothing to do with Cruz, whom I would have balked against because of his connection to PEDs and defensive liabilities.

The Mets signed Young prior to the Winter Meetings when the market was fresh. Cruz was signed after spring training had begun.

Don’t forget at the time the Mets were apprehensive about giving up a compensatory draft pick. They didn’t have to surrender a pick for Young.

The market has dwindled dramatically since they signed Young. GM Sandy Alderson, who initially suggested he might let things play out in the market, had no way of knowing Cruz would sign for what he did, especially when the early reports had him asking for $75 million over five years.

Signing a power-hitting outfielder was a primary need and Alderson rolled the dice with Young. His odds were more in his favor later with Curtis Granderson.

But, for Cruz, who would have guessed this?

Maybe had the Mets re-visited Cruz with a low-ball offer, he could have signed with them, but the feeling is it wouldn’t have been a good fit because of the PED issue.

And, had they inked both Young and Cruz to one-year deals, the odds are good they would have needed to shop again for outfielders next winter.

As for Cruz, this is the best thing that could happen to him because it affords him an opportunity to put up monster numbers in bandbox Camden Yards and try free agency against next year.

ON DECK: Collins wants players to reveal injuries.

Feb 20

Mets List: Top Ten Prospects

At least four of the New York Mets’ top ten prospects according to Baseball Prospectus are expected to play for the organization this season.

Baseball Prospectus, a website dealing with minor league prospects, to nobody’s surprise lists first pitcher Noah Syndergaard, whom manager Terry Collins said has a “hook from hell,’’ referring to the curveball to complement his 97 mph., fastball.

Here’s the list and their chances of playing for the Mets this season:

RHP Noah Syndergaard: As a Super Two, the Mets don’t foresee bringing up Syndergaard before June. Until then the Mets will use Daisuke Matsuzaka and/or John Lannan as the fifth starter.

C Travis d’Arnaud: Injuries derailed his opportunity last year. He goes into the season as the projected starter. The early returns were good on him defensively, but he needs to show something at the plate.

INF Wilmer Flores: He showed flashes of being able to hit, but the Mets must find a position for him. Manager Terry Collins left open the possibility of playing him at shortstop, but said he’ll likely open the season on the minor league level to get at-bats.

RHP Rafael Montero: As with Syndergaard, don’t expect to see him before June.

SS Amed Rosario: Was in the rookie year in 2013, and will be in Class A this season. He’s still at least three years away.

1B Dominic Smith: Last year’s first-round draft pick played for two Mets’ Rookie League teams last year and is expected to start the season in Single A. If he hits for the power expected of him, he could finish in Double A.

OF Cesar Puello: Is the Mets’ top outfield prospect outside of Juan Lagares. He hit .326 last year at Double A Binghamton and is expected to be in Triple A this season.

C Kevin Plawecki: Some scouts say he might have a higher upside than d’Arnaud. He’ll start the season in Double A.

CF Brandon Nimmo: One of Sandy Alderson’s draft picks. Hit .273 last season at Single A, which doesn’t warrant an immediate promotion.

RHP Marcos Molina: Has a 1.25 WHIP in two seasons of Rookie League ball. Could start there again or possibly in Single A.

Note: Each Thursday I plan to post a Mets’ related list.

 

 

Feb 08

We May Have Seen The Last Of Alex Rodriguez

With Alex Rodriguez’s decision to drop his Triple Play lawsuits against Major League Baseball, Commissioner Bud Selig and the Players Association, it is extremely possible we have seen the last of the player who one time seemed destined to hold all the records.

In doing so, Rodriguez will accept the 162-game suspension that will cost him the 2014 season and $25 million.

RODRIGUEZ: Going, going gone.

RODRIGUEZ: Going, going gone.

While the reaction of Rodriguez’s decision has been positive, speculation is the suit was dropped because he was throwing good money after bad. He would stand to lose $10 million in legal fees.

While I have no doubt Rodriguez did something, nobody has said to what extent. I still call into question Major League Baseball’s tactics in the Biogenesis case, which could cost Rodriguez his career.

Rodriguez can return for 2015, and indicates he wants a post-playing career in baseball. Good luck with that … it definitely wouldn’t have happened had he followed through with the suit.

Rodriguez will be 40 in 2015, and after being away from the game for a year, one has to wonder how much he’ll lose. He could spend the time rehabbing and getting his surgically-repaired hips stronger.

Still, I don’t know if it will do any good for his career. The Yankees are obligated to pay him $62 million, but in what capacity?

Will they bring him back and deal with that distraction for two more years, or will they simply buy him out?

I’m betting the latter, thinking we’ll never see Rodriguez play another major league game again.

 

Jan 06

Remembering Jerry Coleman; A Baseball Player And Human Treasure

Most every organization has their own Ralph Kiner, a legendary figure who didn’t carve out his career with the New York Mets, but became to define the franchise in the broadcast booth.

The San Diego Padres’ Kiner was Jerry Coleman, who played second base for the Yankees, spanning the end of the Joe DiMaggio and beginning of the Mickey Mantle eras. He was so much more than a guy who showed up at Yankees’ Old Timers Game and prompted kids to ask their fathers, “who is that?”

COLEMAN: Good player; great person.

COLEMAN: Good player; great person.

I never saw him play, but heard him on the radio numerous times and learned of his malapropos. Ralph isn’t the only one to make you scratch your heads and wonder, “what did he just say?’’

One of the perks in covering the Yankees and Mets was getting to meet and talk to the players I grew up watching and only heard about. Coleman was one of those men.

I’m a World War II history buff and was fascinated to learn of his record as a pilot in both World War II and Korea. He flew well over 100 combined missions in those wars.

I forget the year, but was with the Mets in San Diego and wanted to meet him. I was told he would be at the park early, so I showed up well before game time, knocked on the door to the Padres’ broadcast booth, introduced my myself and asked if I could get ten minutes with him sometime during the series.

Almost an hour-and-a-half later I left the Padres’ booth with a full notebook and my head swimming.

We talked about his career and military service. We talked about playing baseball in 1940s and 1950s New York. We talked about the evolution of baseball radio play-by-play. We talked for over an hour before I got around to asking him about DiMaggio and the guy I really wanted to ask him about, which was Mantle. I was always a Mantle guy.

What I remember most was his sense of humor and his warmth. His humility and passion for the sport was evident. I was there to ask about him, but he asked about me. I got the feeling he was genuinely interested and it made me feel good. Those I later spoke with said “that’s typical of Jerry.”

Later, I talked to several Padres’ writers who weren’t short on stories. Regretfully, I didn’t do my story justice in relation to the time he so generously gave me.

Like I said, meeting Jerry Coleman and others like him is one the best perks of the job. Baseball is loaded with personalities and characters like Jerry Coleman. I’ve met many, and would like to talk to many others. Regretfully, there are many more I will never get the chance.

The Hall of Fame announcements will be Wednesday, and I am proud I have a vote. Coleman was not a Hall of Fame player, but he was a Hall of Fame person and I am so fortunate to have met him.

I was saddened to learn of his passing over the weekend. Others who knew him well will have words that would do him greater justice. I simply want to say I was glad to meet him and express my sympathies to his friends and family.

You were lucky to have such a treasure in your lives.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 19

Where Does Mets Farm System Rank?

syndergaard montero

Matt Mosher writes…

During a Baseball Prospectus Chat today, I asked Jason Parks, their head prospect guy, if the Mets farm was Top 10. (I assumed they were) He replied that they definitely were not.

That’s noteworthy because I believe he ranked them at No. 10 last year. So, at least according to one outlet, the farm’s overall ranking has dropped. Be interesting to see if Baseball America drops them some too. They are usually more harsh on the Mets than BP is. The lack of bats is completely killing them.

Joe D. writes…

Thanks for the heads up. I’m not surprised at all. With Zack Wheeler now in the Majors, you’d have to think they’d take a hit. But what really hurts them most was that top picks Brandon Nimmo and Gavin Cecchini didn’t burst out of the gate the way everyone expected. Additionally, their top position player Cesar Puello was suspended for PEDs.

I would say the Mets are probably in the 14-16 range and mostly because of Noah Syndergaard and Rafael Montero, a solid and “healthy” season from Steven Matz, the emergence of Gabriel Ynoa and Jeff Walters, and Kevin Plawecki producing in A-Ball. By the way, how bad was that Fangraphs Top 10?

* * * * * * * *

Here are a couple of relevant Mets related questions from yesterday’s chat at BP:

Maybe an early holiday gift for readers: OFP grades/lines for Syndergaard, Stephenson, and Giolito? 

Syndergaard: 7 FB; 7 CB; 6+ CH
OFP: 7; No. 2 starter

Stephenson: 7+ FB; 7 CB; 5+ CH
OFP: 7; No. 2 starter

Giolito: 8 FB; 8 CB; 6+ CH
OFP: 8; No. 1 starter

The Mets are a top ten farm, right?

No. They aren’t a top ten farm. They have some very nice pieces, but it fades quickly after the first few names on the list.

Is Dominic Smith already the #1 ranked 1B prospect in the game? Potential 25/100?

I don’t see that kind of over-the-fence power from him. I like the bat, but I wouldn’t take him over Singleton, even with Singleton’s recent run of slack.

Thanks to Matt Mosher for the email and link to BP…