Jul 08

Just As Well Colon Goes To Twins

Initially, I advocated the Mets re-sign Bartolo Colon, but it is just as well he hooked on with Minnesota on a minor league deal on Friday. Colon was released by Atlanta, July 4, and the Mets expressed immediate interest.

COLON: Signs with Twins. (FOX Sports)

COLON: Signs with Twins. (FOX Sports)

“We made a strong effort to re-sign Bartolo,’’ Mets GM Sandy Alderson said in a statement. “But he decided to go elsewhere.’’

If the Mets were in a serious pennant race, then sure, go for it. Colon might give the Mets a few good starts and eat up some innings. But, on second thought, they aren’t and have several arms they still must learn about in Robert Gsellman, Seth Lugo and Rafael Montero.

Assuming they stay healthy, they could get up to ten starts in the second half. That should provide the Mets enough of a litmus test for them to make some decisions about the future. Gsellman and Lugo pitched roughly half a season for the Mets in 2016 and their performances this year have been spotty at best. And, Montero has a lot to prove.

And, considering Noah Syndergaard and Matt Harvey are coming off injuries, to have established depth would be essential assuming the Mets believe they can contend next year.

Every personnel decision Alderson makes has to be with next year in mind and Colon would be nothing more than a stop-gap because the Mets wouldn’t sign him for 2018.

 

 

Jun 29

Should Mets Bring Colon Back For Encore?

Why not? With their pitching staff in shambles, why shouldn’t the Mets consider bringing back Bartolo Colon for the rest of the season?

COLON: Why not? (AP)

COLON: Why not? (AP)

The 44-year-old Colon – who his 2-8 with an 8.14 ERA – was designated for assignment today by the Braves. (Part of that ERA has to be attributable pitching in Atlanta’s new stadium.)

Colon returned from the disabled list June 6 from a strained oblique and stiff back. If he passes a physical, why not bring him back, either as a starter or reliever? He’s failed to make it to the fifth in his last three starts.

After his last start, Colon said: “I felt good, I just feel like I’ve kind of hit a rough streak, to be honest, and it’s tough to just snap out of it. The reality is that I’ve been getting hit hard and that’s the truth and you can’t dance around it.’’

Colon can’t be any worse than who the Mets have thrown out there. The Mets know him and it would be a great story. The bottom line is the Mets have nothing to lose by bringing Colon back for an encore. They might even sell a few tickets.

 

May 09

Humble Harvey Apologizes; Now We Wait

A humbled Matt Harvey said and promised to do all the right things. However, actions always speak louder than words, and it will take more than just a quality start Friday in Milwaukee for his apology to be accepted.

“First off, as I just did with my teammates and all the coaches, I apologized for my actions and I do apologize for my actions,” was how Harvey opened his press conference and Citi Field today.

HARVEY: Apology accepted. (AP)

HARVEY: Apology accepted. (AP)

“Obviously, I’m extremely embarrassed by my actions.”

Harvey was emotional, soft-spoken and contrite. There wasn’t a hint of arrogance. He was a man asking for another chance. He admitted he was wrong. As far as getting another chance, Harvey said it was something that needed to be earned.

Harvey was a no-show for Saturday’s game, and the Mets didn’t know of his condition until team security personnel came to his Manhattan apartment at 10 p.m.

They found him well, and when he reported to Citi Field for his Sunday start against Miami, he was suspended for three days. That gave him plenty of time to think about what he would say and the tone of his message.

The apology was “heartfelt,” said Curtis Granderson, one of many Mets who insisted they still trusted Harvey and had his back.

He would need his teammates’ trust and respect to move forward, as manager Terry Collins said, “he can’t do it alone.”

Collins is old school in many ways and has heard more than his fair share of apologies. He knows sincerity when he hears it.

“He gave it some great thought and certainly did it the right way,” Collins said. “I say, `Don’t tell me, show me.’ I think everybody deserves a second chance. Those guys in that room respect him.”

Part of earning respect is owning up to his actions.

“Yes, I was out on Friday night, past curfew,” Harvey said. “I did play golf Saturday morning and I put myself in a bad place to be ready to show up for a ballgame. It is my responsibility and I take full blame for that.”

When Noah Syndergaard was injured, Harvey was moved up to take his spot, then complained he wasn’t given enough time. He said he lifted weights the day before, something he shouldn’t have done.

Harvey was making excuses for a bad outing. Today, he accepted clubbing isn’t proper game preparation: “People make mistakes, and there are things I have realized the last couple days. … [What] I should be doing is putting myself in a better place to perform physically.”

Harvey could have gone Wednesday afternoon, but Collins opted for Friday, which would spare him getting a negative reception at Citi Field.

“I’m looking forward to getting everything back on track and helping this organization moving forward,” Harvey said. “They have my word on that.”

If there is a clubhouse leader with David Wright out indefinitely it is Granderson, who when asked if he bought Harvey’s apology, said: “There’s no reason why I wouldn’t.It was genuine. It was heartfelt. He definitely thought it out and knew what he wanted to say. I think guys have spoken to him even before he said something today, and guys will continue to talk to him after today.”

One of those guys was Bartolo Colon, who reached out in a text telling him he needed to make baseball a priority.

Today was the first step.

One issue Harvey would not address was a report he planned to file a grievance with the Players Association.

There was no way he was going to admit to that today.

“That’s the last thing in the last three days I’ve thought about,” Harvey said. “I’ve been thinking about the team more than anything. … I’ve apologized for what I’ve done. My job is to move forward and do everything I can to help this team and organization get back on track.”

One would think a legal battle isn’t the right was.

May 06

Today’s Question: Is Last Year’s Gsellman Back?

Robert Gsellman was one of the surprise Mets in 2016, coming to the major leagues when Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz were injured and filled the void that made the playoffs possible. This season, after Bartolo Colon left as a free-agent and Seth Lugo was injured, Gsellman started the year in the rotation.

Gsellman has struggled against Miami, but is coming off his first victory of the season Monday in Atlanta. That leads to the question: What Gsellman will the Mets see tonight?

The key for Gsellman has always been the first inning. If he gets by that obstacle, the odds shift in his favor. He has a lifetime 7.82 ERA in the first inning, but in the second through the fourth innings it is 1.85.

Yes, that’s the margin separating victory and defeat.

 

Apr 06

Game Wrap: Harvey, D’Arnaud Carry Mets Past Braves

GAME:  #3

SCORE: @Mets 6, Braves 2

RECORD: 2-1    RISP: 2-for-7, four LOB

HOMERS: 1 Wilmer Flores (1).

HARVEY: Big step. (AP)

HARVEY: Big step. (AP)

ANALYSIS

Perhaps the two Mets carrying the weight of the heaviest expectations for this season – Matt Harvey and Travis d’Arnaud – came up big in Thursday night’s victory over the Braves.

Harvey, whose velocity was an issue during spring training, gave up a pair of homers to Matt Kemp, but was generally superb, giving up three hits overall in 6.2 innings. Harvey’s fastball clocked between 94-97 mph., but also important was his ability to command his secondary pitches.

“Obviously, it has been a long time since I’ve gone into the seventh inning,” Harvey told reporters. “For me, the big thing for me was to pound the zone and go as deep into the game as I could.”

As for d’Arnaud, his inability to stay healthy, hit and throw out potential base-stealers has caused many to speculate as to his future with the Mets. It’s just one game, but d’Arnaud’s two-run double in the fifth put the Mets ahead to stay.

ON THE MOUND: Fernando Salas – who was working for the third straight game – struck out Dansby Swanson with the bases loaded to end the eighth inning. … It wasn’t a save situation, but Addison Reed worked a 1-2-3 ninth.

AT THE PLATE: Flores, batting cleanup, hit a two-run homer. … Jose Reyes had his first hit of the season. … Jay Bruce scored a run and walked. He’s drawn four walks in the first three games and leads the Mets in hitting with a .333 average.

IN THE FIELD: Flores played first base. … I would still like to see Michael Conforto get a start in the outfield.

EXTRA INNINGS: In a testament to screwy scheduling, the Braves are back at Citi Field again at the end of the month.

ON DECK: The Mets continue their homestand Friday against Miami with Zack Wheeler getting his first start in nearly two years.