May 18

Will We See D’Arnaud Again?

ESPN’s Adam Rubin reports Travis d’Arnaud is in California rehabbing his right shoulder with a private trainer, which makes me wonder if we’ll ever see him in a Mets’ uniform again, much less develop into an All-Star player anywhere.

His inability to stay on the field is rapidly derailing a career that has never gotten off the ground.

D'ARNAUD: Gone, but how soon forgotten? (AP)

D’ARNAUD: Gone, but how soon forgotten? (AP)

D’Arnaud working with a private physical therapist makes me wonder why he isn’t in Port St. Lucie or in New York where he can be around team doctors and officials. When I recall the controversy of where Matt Harvey would rehab his elbow, I wonder why the double standard.

It’s a given the Mets value Harvey more than d’Arnaud, but this detachment makes me think he’ll never make it as the player they hoped he’d be and are beginning the process of cutting ties.

D’Arnaud went on the disabled list April 26 with a right rotator cuff strain, which was aggravated when he tried throwing May 7 in Port St. Lucie. GM Sandy Alderson said the pain in his shoulder subsided, but couldn’t provide a possible return date. He couldn’t even pinpoint a month.

As for the California question, Alderson said: “He’s more or less as well off out there with somebody who knows him as well as our guys would know him. Right now I can’t give you chapter and verse on exactly what his return [date] is. We have to keep in mind that sometimes when we cite chapter and verse on when he will return, we’re kidding ourselves.”

That was a fairly evasive answer, which we’ve come to expect from Alderson.

The season began with d’Arnaud the starter and Kevin Plawecki the backup. Depending on how the year progressed, one ocould be traded as a catcher with major league experience is a valuable commodity.

Plawecki has proven good defensively, in fact, Mets’ pitchers have a better ERA with him behind the plate. He offense picked up on the last road trip, but he still needs a way to go. Gone are the days when a catcher was supposed to be an offensive force – Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, Carlton Fisk, Thurman Munson and Mike Piazza – as defense is now paramount.

Buster Posey and Yadier Molina are today’s premier catchers, but Plawecki has potential. Should d’Arnaud play again this season and the debate resurface between him or Plawecki, the Mets must consider his injury history.

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May 03

Conforto Comparisons, Contract Speculation Premature

When Michael Conforto finished second to Bryce Harper for NL Player of the Month honors for April came the inevitable comparisons and with them predictable comments the Mets might be wise to consider signing him to a long-term contract.

That won’t happen anytime soon.

CONFORTO: Too soon to talk contract. (AP)

CONFORTO: Too soon to talk contract. (AP)

While the thought of securing Conforto is appealing, it’s not on the Mets’ priority list for a variety of reasons.

If the Mets sign a player to a long-term deal before declaring free-agency, they will be inclined to do so with Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom, Steven Matz and Matt Harvey, although I still maintain the last one will eschew any early contract negotiations and wait until he’s on the market.

The Mets have the money to sign all four pitchers, plus Conforto, if they are inclined, but that’s not the way they do business. It’s early in all their careers and so much can happen, such as injuries and poor performance that could derail plans all together on long-term contracts.

Let’s not forget Tuesday night’s game against the Braves was the 80th of Conforto’s promising, yet still very young career. Conversely, Harper – a three-time All-Star – is in his fifth season and has played in 535 games. Putting the brakes on the comparison even further, Harper has 106 career homers while Conforto has 75 career hits.

It’s way too soon to compare Conforto to Harper or Mike Trout, or to a lot of people. Eighty games, people. That’s half a season.

I like Conforto. There’s so much about his game to like, including his potential. His career is off to a good start, but the reality of it is it’s way too soon to be talking about such things as long-term contracts.

May 02

Mets’ April Review And Looking At May

Just as they did last season, the Mets won 15 games in April, and again the spark was a long winning streak. Last year it was 11 games; this year it was eight.

WALKER: My Mets' MVP for April. (AP)

WALKER: My Mets’ MVP for April. (AP)

As much as the Mets like to boast about their young pitching – as well they should – the springboard this time was power. It was not, as has been suggested, Terry Collins’ knee jerk managing in the eighth game of the season.

Yes, they won that game and have gone on to win five straight series. That’s purely coincidental.

The Mets tied a club record with 33 homers for the month, which enabled them to overcome Jacob deGrom’s two missed starts because of a strained lat muscle and Matt Harvey’s 0-3 start.

A key that can’t be underestimated has been the Mets’ ability to get an early lead, as they scored first in 10 of their last 14 games in April. Overall, they are 13-3 when they scored first this year.

The Mets crushed three homers and took a 4-0 lead in the first inning Monday against the Braves.

APRIL MVP

Contrary to the popular opinion of Yoenis Cespedes, I’m going with Neil Walker, who was hitting before Michael Conforto was moved to third in the order. Walker is tied for third in the majors with nine homers and finished the month with a career-high 19 for April.

Conforto would be my second choice and Cespedes third.

PITCHER OF THE MONTH

Noah Syndergaard took a pounding Sunday, but has been overpowering with 38 strikeouts with a 1.69 ERA for the month.

KEY GAME OF THE MONTH

Matt Harvey lost his first three starts, but finally won, April 22, 6-3, at Atlanta. He wasn’t totally on his game, but he pitched out of trouble enough times to turn it around. Sure, the game when Cespedes hit a three-run pinch-hit homer was more dramatic, but in the big picture getting Harvey going was more important.

KEY MOVE OF THE MONTH

On April 15 in Cleveland, Collins moved Conforto to the No. 3 spot in the batting order and the Mets have sizzled since going 12-3. When hitting third or fourth, Conforto is batting .373 with nine doubles, four homers and 15 RBI.

RED FLAGS ENDURED

Jacob deGrom missed two starts because of a strained right lat; Harvey lost his first three starts; closer Jeurys Familia sustained a rocky stretch, but has converted all eight of this save opportunities.

KEY ISSUE RESOLVED

Shortstop and the bullpen were two significant issues facing the Mets entering the season, but Asdrubal Cabrera has been superb both in the field and at the plate. The bullpen converted nine of 11 save opportunities and stranded 26 of 35 runners.

HEALTH ISSUES

Travis d’Arnaud was placed on the disabled list with a strained rotator cuff. … Cespedes missed close to a week with a bruised right leg. … David Wright ended the month without a problem, but his back remains an issue.

SIX QUESTIONS RAISED

Will the power continue?

Power of not, can Conforto keep it up?

Can Wright stay healthy?

Will the new guys, Walker and Cabrera, keep hitting?

Will we see deGrom and Harvey go on a roll?

Can the bullpen keep it up?

BY THE NUMBERS

.333: Walker’s average with RISP.

4: Times the Mets hit back-to-back homers.

5: Consecutive series the Mets won to close the month.

9: Consecutive games in which Cespedes had at least one extra-base hit.

22: Strikeouts by Cespedes.

29: Strikeouts by Wright.

33: Homers hit by the month.

LOOKING AT MAY’S SCHEDULE

They began May losing to Madison Bumgarner Sunday and close their current homestand against Atlanta.

The Mets are on a stretch of 17 games in 17 days, including their first West Coast trip, with four games in San Diego and Los Angeles and three in Colorado.

They’ll return home for a pair of three-games series against Washington (May 17-19) and Milwaukee (May 20-22), then go to Washington (May 23-25) for three more against the Nationals.

They’ll close out the month with three at home against the Dodgers (May 27-29) and two against the Chicago White Sox (a three-game series that ends June 1).

 

Apr 27

April 27, Mets’ Lineup Against Cincinnati

Matt Harvey will be pitching tonight to give the Mets’ consecutive series sweeps and extend their winning streak to six games. Harvey, after losing his first three starts, is coming off his first victory of the season.

Here’s the Mets’ lineup behind him:

Alejandro De Aza – RF; Curtis Granderson finally gets a rest. De Aza is hitless in seven at-bats this year with RISP.

David Wright – 3B: Drove in the winning run Tuesday. Back in the two hole.

Michael Conforto – LF: Back to hitting third. Has hit in five straight games, going 9-for-18.

Lucas Duda – 1B: Has 105 career homers as a Met, 11th on the franchise’s all-time list. Ed Kranepool is 10th with 118.

Neil Walker – 2B: Seven homers in his last 11 games. Tied for second with eight homers, trailing only Bryce Harper.

Asdrubal Cabrera – SS: Has hit safely in 11 of his last 13 games.

Juan Lagares – CF: Yoenis Cespedes not starting again. As long as he can pinch-hit there should be no worries.

Kevin Plawecki – C: Taking over the job with Travis d’Arnaud on the the disabled list.

Harvey – RHP: Hitters have a .538 on-base percentage against Harvey when runners are in scoring position.

Apr 23

Mets Matters: Harvey Still Searching

Mets manager Terry Collins finally admitted the team’s handling of its pitchers perhaps contributed to Matt Harvey‘s sluggish start. The Mets held their pitchers back a week because of last season’s workloads. Harvey threw 12 innings in spring training whereas most starters log close to 30 innings. Harvey’s spring was further cut short by a urinary tract infection.

mets-matters logo“He really never got to where he was game-ready at the end of spring training,” Collins told reporters. “It just kind of carried over into the season.”

Now, was that so hard?

Harvey lost his first three starts before winning an unimpressive start Friday night.

“It’s still a work in progress,” Harvey said. “Parts of the game obviously felt better, and it felt like I was releasing the ball the way I should be. Other times it was not that way. I’m still working. There’s more positives than negatives out of this game.”

Perhaps the biggest negative was Harvey throwing 101 pitches in five innings.

“Obviously throwing that many pitches in five innings is not ideal,” Harvey said. “My goal today was going out there and really trying to work on what we had worked on this past week. At times, I was able to do that, and at times I fell out of that. I have to re-find that.”

Prior to the game, pitching coach Dan Warthen said Harvey had developed a mechanical flaw where he collapsed his push-off leg working out of the stretch.

“The majority of the time out of the stretch I did feel better,” Harvey said. “Like I said, there’s still work to be done.”

If this is the work in progress Harvey proclaims it to be, it could take a few more starts before he gets it right.

But, on a positive note, at least the Mets seem to have an idea of what’s wrong with Harvey.

DeGROM READY FOR SUNDAY:  Jacob deGrom rejoined the Mets today after being on emergency family leave and will start Sunday against the Braves.

DeGrom said his two-week-old son, Jaxon, was suffering from apnea and would stop breathing while he slept.

“It was definitely scary,” deGrom said told reporters. “When all the tests came back and nothing was seriously wrong, we were pretty relieved.”

Sunday’s start will be his first since April 8, a game he left with tightness in his right lat after six innings. After studying video, deGrom theorizes his landing leg was too stiff.

“I feel good,” deGrom said. “The last few bullpen sessions have been good.”

CESPEDES SIDELINED: Collins said Yoenis Cespedes aggravated the bruise on his right leg sliding into second and would probably not play the remaining two games during this series.

“The bruise is pretty big,” Collins said. “He’s aggravated it, and he’s limping pretty bad. … He’s pretty swelled. He’s certainly not going to be available today.”

 

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