Mar 15

Do Mets Have Guts To Leave Harvey Off Opening Day Roster?

The question must be posed: Does the Mets’ top brass have the stones to leave Matt Harvey off the Opening Day roster?  While it is clear Jacob deGrom is ready for the start of the season, it is also painfully obvious Harvey is not.

HARVEY: Not ready. (AP)

HARVEY: Not ready. (AP)

While exhibition numbers aren’t important, after Harvey was pasted once again today by the Marlins, it is hard to ignore his 0-3 record and 7.88 ERA. That high an ERA is hard to dismiss any time of the year.

Harvey broke into our consciousness in 2012 with near pinpoint control, supreme confidence and a fastball that regularly clocked in the high 90s. Today, an elbow and shoulder surgery later, his confidence as battered as his body, and a fastball in the low 90s, Harvey isn’t close to being the stud pitcher and cartoon superhero character Mets’ fans yearn to see again.

Earlier this spring Harvey said he had no doubt his velocity would return. He was far less optimistic today; he appeared to concede to a new chapter in his career.

“I’m not looking to throw 100 mph., again or 97 even,” Harvey told reporters. “My job is to get people out no matter what I’m throwing, and I’m looking forward to it. [The velocity] is going to be there.”

But, what will it be?

Pitching coach Dan Warthen said the Mets won’t know about Harvey’s physical abilities for several months, claiming he’s guessing May.

“History says with [thorasic surgery] it’s 10 months out,” Warthen said. “That’s when you really start to feel strong. Generally, when you open a season you gain two miles per hour. If he’s playing at 94, 95, it’s a completely different story.”

But, Harvey’s throwing 92 these days at best, which means he basically must reinvent himself, which will be hard to do with another three exhibition starts remaining.

That brings us back to the original question as to whether the Mets if Harvey doesn’t immediately turn it around, would leave him back to get stronger and work on his mechanics. Considering their potential depth with Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman – and possibly Zack Wheeler – that would be the prudent option.

The Mets are blessed to have the depth most teams don’t possess, so why not take advantage of it? Assuming Harvey isn’t ready in three three weeks – and that’s what Warthen is saying – it would be better to utilize that depth in April to get him ready rather that use it later if he breaks down.

Harvey won’t like it, but that’s not important. Getting him ready is.

Mar 12

Reed Off To Slow Start

The Mets are two weeks into their spring training schedule, and, of course, statistics don’t count. However, that doesn’t mean I don’t occasionally sneak a peak at the numbers – and think red flag.

REED: Slow start. (AP)

REED: Slow start. (AP)

I’m not surprised about David Wright, because in the back of my mind I anticipated something happening. Wilmer Flores is having a miserable spring, but he’s not a centerpiece player.

Pennants aren’t won in April, but they can be lost if a team falls into a gulley. With many teams the rickety bridge is a bullpen and that’s the potential trap for the Mets.

Of all the Mets’ numbers, potentially the most alarming to me belong to Addison Reed, the closer who’ll replace the soon-to-be suspended Jeurys Familia.

Statistics are a measure – a reflection – of performance, and currently, Reed isn’t what the Mets have in mind. In five innings over five games, Reed has a 16.20 ERA, but the number we should be paying attention to is a 2.40 WHIP.

That’s a lot of base runners, and they usually translate into runs.

We have to look at Reed like any other player, that the numbers don’t matter now. There’s nothing to get excited about now, only something worth noting.

Feb 27

A Plan For Using Reyes

On days Jose Reyes doesn’t play, who will hit leadoff for the Mets?

Asdrubal Cabrera was there today and homered in today’s 5-2 loss to Houston. Other reported candidates are Curtis Granderson, because he’s had success there before, and Neil Walker, because he has a decent on-base percentage.

REYES: A plan for him. (AP)

REYES: A plan for him. (AP)

Another option is Juan Lagares on days he plays center.

My first inclination is Granderson because of his success, but I’m also thinking of ways of getting Reyes more playing time. A healthy, productive Reyes still has the potential to be an impact player.

I’m projecting Reyes will play a lot of third base in April because David Wright is likely to stay back at the start of the season for an extended spring training, but what about when Wright is on the major league roster?

If manager Terry Collins does this the right way, he could conceivably give Reyes three starts a week, not including as the designated hitter or in the outfield.

Collins has three fragile infielders, four if you include first baseman Lucas Duda. I would think giving Wright, Cabrera and Walker rest at least once a week would be a paramount concern.

Start Reyes at least three starts a week, or rotate him with Wilmer Flores (who also homered today). That way, you’re giving Reyes and Flores enough starts to stay sharp at the plate, and you’re also giving everybody else at least one day off a week to keep them fresh.

However, Reyes will miss time this spring playing for the Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic. In this case, if you’re the Mets and want to see Reyes at multiple positions, he’s not doing himself any favors by missing a lot of time in camp.

While the Mets made a deal out of emulating the versatility of the champion Chicago Cubs, it must be remembered they don’t have somebody like Ben Zobrist. Nor do they have a MVP caliber bat like Kris Bryant they can move around.

Jan 31

No Surprises, Noah To Get Opening Day Nod

Spring training will bring about a myriad of questions the Mets must answer prior to the start of the season. Who their Opening Day starter will be is not one of them. Normally, manager Terry Collins dances around the issue like it is a State Secret although there’s little doubt.

SYNDERGAARD: Will get OD nod. (FOX)

SYNDERGAARD: Will get OD nod. (FOX)

Not this year, as Collins told The New York Post, Noah Syndergaard will get the ball against the Braves, April 3, at Citi Field.

Syndergaard was 14-9 with a 2.60 ERA over 30 starts last season with a fastball averaging 98 mph. and a slider at 90.9 mph. And, he did it while pitching with a bone spur in his right elbow.

“He is one of our big character guys,” Collins told The Post. “He says, ‘Give me the ball,’ and he goes out and does the best he can. … He’s been fun to watch his development in such a short time.”

Syndergaard still needs to throw a complete season for the Mets, but came close last year with those 30 starts. Syndergaard also threw seven scoreless innings in the Mets’ wild-card loss to the Giants, but looked every bit the ace they believe he can be.

And, aces get the ball on Opening Day.

Jan 18

Could Conforto Open Season In Minors?

It was last April when manager Terry Collins said Michael Conforto was the Mets’ No. 3 hitter for the future. A year later, don’t be surprised if he opened the season with the Mets’ Triple-A Las Vegas affiliate.

I don’t like the idea, but considering the Mets’ muddled outfield situation, it isn’t farfetched, especially if they can’t trade Jay Bruce. If Bruce stays, he’ll play right with Curtis Granderson in center and Yoenis Cespedes in left.

CONFORTO: Could he open season in minors? (Getty)

CONFORTO: Could he open season in minors? (Getty)

Juan Lagares must stay to give Granderson rest in center field. Either Lagares or Granderson could give Cespedes rest if he needs a day off. Currently, the Mets aren’t ready to say they trust Conforto in center field.

If the Mets can’t trade Bruce, he must stay and play or totally lose his trade value. The Mets wouldn’t want to pay him $13 million to sit.

The Mets’ potential trade market for Bruce was dramatically sliced within the past week when Baltimore traded for Seth Smith; Toronto re-signed Jose Bautista and Philadelphia signed Michael Saunders.

Personally, I’ve always been in Conforto’s camp and opposed the Cespedes signing in part because I felt it would stunt Conforto’s growth. If the Mets kept Conforto as one of their five outfielders, he’d struggle for at-bats and playing time, notably from Lagares and Bruce.

One possibility is to keep Brandon Nimmo over Conforto, but again they’ll face the issue of one of their prime outfield prospects struggling for at-bats.