Apr 30

Jeremy Hefner Tries To Stop Mets’ Slide

Jeremy Hefner: Streak stopper.

Some clairvoyant on television said this morning, “the Mets have lost five straight for the first time this season.’’  He’s probably right, but that’s an awful assumption.

All streaks must end somewhere, and while Matt Harvey didn’t stop the slide last night, the Mets will ask Hefner to do it tonight.

Hefner, who hasn’t been consistently good this season, is coming off a solid start in which he gave up a run in seven innings, April 25, against the Dodgers.

The Mets, losers of five straight and nine of their last 12 games, will need Hefner to contain two horrible statistics: he’s walked at least three in each of his last three starts, and he’s given up seven homers in 21 innings

A big Ouch! on that last number.

“It bugged me a little more than I let on,’’ Hefner said of the homers allowed after the Dodger start. “If I’m successful, I’m getting groundballs. … So that’s something I’ve still got to work on.’’

A case can be made Hefner saved his job last week against the Dodgers, but then again, just whom do the Mets have to replace him? They won’t bring up Zack Wheeler before he’s ready, and he’s not close.

Hefner was thrust into the rotation when Johan Santana went down, but he’s become a mainstay. Hefner matter-of-factly says his objective with each game is to give the Mets a quality start, which is three runs given up in six innings, something he’s done twice in four starts.

The offense has to shoulder some of the blame for the Mets being 0-4 in Hefner’s starts as it has given him eight runs in 20 innings.

Hefner is what he is, and that’s a fifth starter. His outpitched his job description in his last start, but he’s not living up to his stated goal of six innings.

The bullpen worked 9.1 innings last night, and with the short turnaround before Wednesday afternoon’s game, the Mets need six from Hefner tonight. His job would be a little easier if the Mets scored some runs, too.

Just saying.

Apr 25

April 25.10: Chat Room, Game #19 vs. Braves: Pelfrey trying to stay perfect.

Mike Pelfrey might finally be getting it. An uncashed checked so far in his career, Pelfrey is pitching with a sense of confidence and purpose early this season.

Hammered in spring training – Pelfrey said he wasn’t worried because he was working on things – the right-hander has been dominant in April and takes a string of 19 scoreless inning into tonight’s game against the Atlanta Braves.

Pelfrey (3-0, 0.86 ERA) is coming off a strong victory over the Chicago Cubs Tuesday in which he gave up three hits in seven scoreless innings.

“He has great rhythm,’’ said manager Jerry Manuel. “There’s a better presence. He’s staying on top of the mound. He’s ready before the hitter is ready. I think he’s that confident and that in control that he could say, `I’m ready to go and I already know what the sequence is.’ ’’

However, his career numbers haven’t been good against the Braves, going 2-5 with a 6.09 ERA nine starts.

Assuming the game isn’t rained out, he could have a pitcher’s duel with the Braves’ Tommy Hanson.

The Mets are going for the sweep and second straight series win.

“When you win a couple series, you start feeling good about yourself,’’ David Wright said. “You go out there expecting to win.’’

Pitching has been the key. The Mets have allowed two or fewer runs five times in the last six games, and has a 2.09 ERA over the last eight.

Apr 25

April 25.10: Is Bay warming up a coincidence?

Jason Bay is starting to warm up, but it is premature to say the line-up switch lit the fire. Dropping Jose Reyes from leadoff to third is, in theory, supposed to provide Bay with more fastballs.

After a RBI triple Friday and three hits yesterday, Bay said: “It’s really only relevant if Reyes is on first or second,’’ Bay said. “I haven’t noticed a huge difference. I think it coincides with me feeling lot better.’’

Bay is too good a hitter for results to not eventually show. Bay said he’s not there, yet, but does feel more relaxed at the plate.

“A few hits I’ve gotten and at-bats I’ve taken, I feel a lot more comfortable and it’s starting to show,’’ said Bay, who has struck out 23 times, but none since the switch.

Bay is right, to fully see the merits of the switch we have to have multiple situations of Bay up with Reyes in steal situations. The one time we had that, Reyes stole second and went to third on a wild throw.

For Jerry Manuel’s switch to work, we need a broader sampling of at-bats.