Aug 01

Mets Wasting Matt Harvey; Giving Games Away

Why are the New York Mets even bothering with Matt Harvey‘s innings cap when they don’t even support him. I know they are trying, but 12 no-decisions? He has more no-decisions than total decisions. That’s incomprehensible.

HARVEY: Another strong effort thrown away. (AP)

HARVEY: Another strong effort thrown away. (AP)

Thursday was another frustrating example of wasting a Harvey start, and truth be told, he didn’t do himself any favors, either. He was in trouble in only one inning, but couldn’t escape. Roger Clemens once said there are two or three moments in a game when the starter must will himself out of an inning if he’s to win. What happened in Miami has happened before, and twice before against the Marlins, when Harvey couldn’t finish the deal.

Believe me, I’m not ripping Harvey, one of the Mets’ true bright spots, but just pointing out something in which he would agree with: When run support is weak, it is all left on the pitcher. By all standards Harvey is having a marvelous year, but has been betrayed by a sputtering offense and occasional defensive breakdown.

This road trip began with a rout in Washington, and the Mets on the verge of a doubleheader sweep of the Nationals until Daniel Murphy threw a ball away resulting in a disappointing split. The next day it was the offense’s inability to hit with runners in scoring position.

The Mets lost three of four in DC, when in reality they could have won three. Getting back to Miami, they could have left with a sweep.

It’s been that way all season for the Mets, who have losing records in one-run games, two-run games, extra-inning games, at home, and against the Nationals and Marlins. They’ve lost ten against the Fish, the worst team in the division.

For the most part, Harvey’s brilliance has overshadowed those records, that is until he’s involved in the game. With a little more support, and a little more of him shutting down an inning, he could have 14 victories by now. Perhaps more.

That’s why it has been frustrating with these Mets. Most national media had them pegged for 100 losses, but they have overachieved to making us believe .500, and possibly second place, is within reach. Hey, they could have jumped the Nationals or at least pulled even with them if you take away Murphy’s throw and add some hits.

Good teams win at home, win within the division, and win the close games. That they are in so many close games to begin with is a positive sign because the alternative is being blown away, as they frequently were last year in the second half.

I was joking about the innings cap, but to a point. If you’re going to limit him, then don’t waste what he gives you, and that’s exactly what the Mets are doing.

Jul 24

Ike Davis Showing Signs

Ike Davis is nowhere close to where he wants to be as a player, and the New York Mets are taking the second half to see if he fits into their plans. Unless Davis goes on a complete tear the next two months, the odds are very good the Mets will not tender a contract and let him go as a free agent.

Understandably, their fear is he’ll walk and become a start someplace else. Nobody will blow them away with a trade offer, so he’s staying out the season.

DAVIS: Looking to smile again. (AP)

DAVIS: Looking to smile again. (AP)

Davis is currently in a platoon with Josh Satin, which he’s understandably not happy about, but he’s not moaning or complaining. He is supportive of Satin. Davis is being the good soldier, albeit publicly, about a disappointing time in his career.

Davis doubled in the tie-breaking run in the sixth inning Tuesday night, but I liked his failed bunt attempt more. It shows his head is in the game; it shows he’s trying to improvise. It shows he’s not going through the motions.

“I mean, I get out a lot anyway, so might as well give it a try,’’ Davis said. “If I get it down in the right spot, it’s a hit. I’m definitely gonna try to do that more often.’’

Davis is supposed to be a power hitter, but with only five homers on the year, he needs to just try to get on base. It doesn’t matter if it is a walk, or broken-bat bloop or a bunt.

Bunting against the shift is difficult because pitchers often pitch inside to induce the hitter to pull into the shift. Davis bunted back to the mound, but the important thing was he wasn’t thinking about driving the ball, but about getting on base.

It was a team first play by Davis, when he could have been tempted to swing for the fences. Later, Davis stayed back on a curveball for a double off the wall in right.

“It definitely feels great to get [a hit], off a curveball, and to get the winning run across the plate,’’ Davis said. “And to drive the ball — I hadn’t driven the ball in a while.’’

Davis is a young player with a lot of room to grow. He’s had good moments, such as hitting 32 homers last year. When he first came up he showed a propensity of going the other way with a pitch and showing patience enough to wait out a pitcher.

He’s hitting .178 overall, but .257 since returning from Las Vegas.  That’s certainly not great, but a sign of progress. We’re not going to see 32 homers from Davis, and probably not even 20. But, after how this season started, progress is a good thing.

ON DECK: Mets notebook

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Jul 06

Ike Davis And Zack Wheeler Bounce Back; Mets Have Decision On Josh Satin

Ike Davis and Zack Wheeler, two key, but struggling players for the New York Mets, came up big Friday night in Milwaukee. In his return from the minors, Davis had three hits, while Wheeler, who was hit hard in his previous start, settled down by throwing more fastballs.

They didn’t have great nights, but most importantly persevered. Davis still had his hitch, but it wasn’t as pronounced. He was quieter at the plate, saying he was “calming everything down.’’

WHEELER: Gets second win. (AP)

WHEELER: Gets second win. (AP)

Wheeler remains a project, but his confidence had to get a boost because he completed five innings and didn’t get overwhelmed by a two-run first. He was especially impressive getting out of a bases-loaded jam in his final inning.

Pitchers aren’t just measured when the mow down an offense, but when they escape trouble. It’s a long process from phenom to dominance, and that will come by reducing his pitch count. He threw 98 in five innings, with only 56 going for strikes.

That will change in time, and hopefully, unlike Davis, he can make the corrections without going to the minors.

Rather than lament his demotion, Davis said all the right things, such that he learned while he was down there and worked hard.

“It’s still not fun to see .160 or whatever is on the scoreboard,’’ Davis told reporters last night at Miller Park. “But I’ve got a lot of time and I can make things up in a hurry. … Leaving on a bad note and coming back on a good note, it’s nice. Hopefully I can continue this and make up some ground.’’

Davis also had praise for his replacement, Josh Satin, who is carrying a ten-game hitting streak.

The Mets have decisions to make on Davis and Satin, notably, which one of them is their future? Davis is making $3.1 million this year, which will increase in 2014. The Mets must decide if they want to tender him a contract or let him become a free agent, or even if they want to trade him. Satin hit well enough to draw interest should the Mets dangle him.

Manager Terry Collins said it is not an option to platoon Davis and Satin, and he will try to keep the latter relevant. Satin, who is hitting .353, was performing because of regular at-bats. It doesn’t look as if he’ll get them now.

Collins said Satin will hit against some lefties, and could also get time at third, second and in the outfield.

“You don’t do what Josh Satin did and then, all of a sudden, go sit on the bench. That’s not going to work,’’ Collins pledged. “I’m going to try to figure out how to get him in there, where to play him.’’

We shall see.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jun 22

Mets Should Not Be Seduced By Davis’ Vegas Numbers

Las Vegas, I learned in grade school geography and reinforced by the movie “Casino,’’ is located in the desert, and when lost in the desert one can fall victim to a mirage. Surely, the New York Mets know this, too, and should not be seduced by the mirage of Ike Davis hitting back-to-back two-homer games.

Davis, once considered part of the Mets’ core, is in Vegas gambling he still has a major league future. He and the Mets are encouraged he’s riding a five-game hitting streak where he is 9-for-16 with four homers and seven RBI. Overall, in 11 games, he is hitting .333 with a .480 on-base percentage.

DAVIS: Not ready. (AP)

DAVIS: Not ready. (AP)

Good, but not good enough, and the Mets would be foolish to fall for the mirage Davis is now a major league hitter. Eleven games means nothing; he needs more than double that amount, perhaps triple it, to prove he’s ready.

Las Vegas manager Wally Backman talks boastfully about correcting Davis’ nasty hitch, and Mets manager Terry Collins said his reports are good in that regard.

It’s still not enough, as Davis’ problems aren’t just mechanical, but mental. His approach is wrong, and I am afraid the four homers will underscore Davis’ problem in bold.

“I am a home run hitter. I like to hit home runs,’’ Davis said this spring. “Strikeouts come with that.’’

It was a faulty answer this spring and it is just as bad now. Davis’ most impressive statistic is seven walks, but in 39 at-bats, Davis has nine strikeouts, so you tell me what he’s learned.

Davis needs to forget about pulling the ball and hitting home runs. He must concentrate on working the count, shortening his swing and using the entire field. Once he’s capable of doing that, then he’ll be putting the ball in play more and consequently his home runs and run production will increase.

That’s the approach Davis must learn, and emphasize to Backman it is something ingrained in him. If he can’t do that, then he’ll come back to the Mets and fall into the same old habits.

The Mets warned not to be discouraged by Zack Wheeler’s numbers because they are skewed by the conditions of the desert. The ball flies in the Pacific Coast League. By the same logic, shouldn’t we also consider Davis’ numbers with skepticism?

The sampling of Davis’ work is too small to make the determination he’s ready to come back. This is no time for the Mets to be fooled again.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jun 13

Even In Defeat Matt Harvey Makes Impact For Mets

You knew Matt Harvey wasn’t going to win them all, but the flip side is the New York Mets can’t lose all his starts, either.

Right?

HARVEY: A lot to like, even in defeat. (AP)

HARVEY: A lot to like, even in defeat. (AP)

At one time Harvey was 4-0 and we were wondering what else could come his way after a Sports Illustrated cover and dating a model. A few runs would be nice, but let’s not get greedy.

Since that start, he is 1-1 with eight no-decisions, including this afternoon’s 2-1 loss to St. Louis at Citi Field in a game the Mets now wish was rained out.

“It’s pitching. It’s going to happen,’’ Harvey told reporters in an answer which gives us another reason to like him.

Harvey said he goes into every start wanting to pitch the distance, not give up runs and win. That’s the attitude every pitcher should carry into every game.

Harvey won’t start the All-Star Game at Citi Field, which would have been a treat, but he could still make the National League roster. If he doesn’t and he stays healthy, there should be other opportunities.

Manager Terry Collins understands the frustrations Harvey might be experiencing, and is impressed with how is young ace is dealing with the stress.

“This guy is a different animal,’’ Collins told reporters. “He’s very, very aware of what he needs to do and what major league pitchers have to do. They can’t worry about lack of offense or [teammates] not making plays.

“They’ve got to go do their jobs. He’s done that, but when you’re pitching as well as he has and are just unable to win some games, it can be a little frustrating, especially for a young guy who is trying to make an impact in this league.’’

So far, even in defeat, Harvey has made a profound impact. And, yes, it would be sweet if we had the chance to see Harvey tip his cap during player introductions at the All-Star Game.