Sep 10

Don’t Buy Into Thinking Wright Injury Could Pave Way For Murphy Trade

My first question stemming from the Mets’ shutting down David Wright for the remainder of the season is: What took them so long, especially considering his propensity for playing through pain and injury?

Seriously, Wright has had a sore left shoulder for weeks. He’s played through worse. Last night, Sandy Alderson said Wright “did what captains do,’’ and he “preserved.’’

MURPHY: Think he's staying. (AP)

MURPHY: Bet on him staying. (AP)

But, could the Mets have been more proactive? It’s easy to say so, but as unlikely as it seemed, the wildcard was still possible, they hadn’t had a winning season since 2008, so their thinking was to go with their best shot, that being Wright.

I won’t bury the Mets for sticking with Wright, but analyze where they are headed without him for the remainder of this season and the future, which some suggest are linked.

It has already been decided Daniel Murphy will replace Wright at third and Dilson Herrera coming off the bench and back to second. In theory, the Mets would be showcasing Murphy for a possible trade this winter.

What’s not to like about Murphy in the eyes of another team? He’s an All-Star; he’s worked hard to become an above average second-baseman; his natural position is third; he doesn’t make a lot of money; and he never stops hustling.

The problem other teams see in him is the same the Mets do, and that’s he doesn’t hit for power, especially at an infield corner position. Nine homers this year and 48 in just less than 3,000 career at-bats won’t have a contender drooling.

The Mets covet a power hitter, and Murphy won’t get them one by himself. The only way Murphy nets the Mets a slugger – especially a corner outfielder – is if he’s packaged with one of the young pitchers they covet.

Bottom line, unless the Mets ease up on their young pitching, I don’t see Murphy going anywhere this winter. That’s because they want to keep their pitching more than they desire a power hitter.

 

Mar 15

Bartolo Colon Gets Vegas Start

The New York Mets signed Bartolo Colon as a two-year, $20-million stopgap to fill the monstrous void created by Matt Harvey’s injury.

An 18-game winner who threw 190.1 innings last season, it is hoped he will better the nine victories Harvey had last year.

COLON: Today's starter (AP).

COLON: Today’s starter (AP).

The second season was the carrot to get Colon to sign – the money didn’t hurt, either – and act as a buffer in case Harvey isn’t ready for 2015, or there is a setback with Zack Wheeler, Noah Syndergaard and Rafael Montero.

Colon is coming off a rocky start in last Monday’s loss to Miami; he gave up three runs in the fourth inning. He called it a “meaningful’’ game and said he was pleased with his control in his first start.

Colon gets by on location and mixing speeds with his fastball and will work on that against Chicago.

“I don’t shy away from throwing what I’m going to throw normally,’’ Colon said earlier this week. “That’s my pitch. I’m a fastball pitcher. That’s what I’m going to use. I’m going to use my best pitch.’’

The current plan is for Colon to enter the season second in the rotation, but he could get the Opening Day start if Jonathon Niese isn’t ready.

Mar 07

Mets’ Terry Collins To Use Replay Today

For years, New York Mets manager Terry Collins did not like the concept of instant replay. That changed, and Collins has the opportunity to test the new instant replay system in today’s exhibition game with St. Louis at Port St. Lucie.

COLLINS: Will use replay today. (AP)

COLLINS: Will use replay today. (AP)

“For years and years I never did – I didn’t like the thought of it,’’ Collins told ESPN. “But the technology is so good now and so fast, you’ve got to use it. I mean, there’s too much money involved. One win all of a sudden can make a big difference.’’

Collins plans to have three starting pitchers watch the broadcast feed from the home clubhouse and use a walkie-talkie to notify bench coach Bob Geren on plays that could be challenged. Collins didn’t specify what format the Mets will use to challenge during the season.

Managers will get one challenge during the season. If they use and lose it prior to the seventh inning, they will lose the chance to challenge again. After the seventh, they can appeal the umpires to confer.

There are several flaws in the system, but one method that should be beneficial and fair to all.

In the National Football League, scoring plays and turnovers are automatically reviewed in the press box and reverses are wired to the officials on the field.

Since all games are televised, and because there have been numerous snafus already this spring resulting in delays, the solution appears obvious. Why not have an umpire or MLB official monitoring the game from the press box?

If there’s a close play, that official can immediately buzz the crew chief the play is under review. Then the results can immediately be transmitted down.

This way, there are no such things as challenges. The idea of losing a challenge because you failed on a previous one is absurd.

Taking the challenge from the manager will undoubtedly not hinder the pace of the game because it eliminates the first step of arguing and then challenging.

If the idea is to get the play correct and be fair, this is the best way.

Mar 07

Good Idea To Ease In David Wright

There will be a David Wright sighting this afternoon for the New York Mets. Manager Terry Collins, referring to an oblique strain in previous springs, took the approach of easing Wright and Daniel Murphy into the lineup this spring.

WRIGHT: Easing into it. (AP)

WRIGHT: Easing into it. (AP)

My first impression is Wright doesn’t need to be rushed and if this helps him stay healthy, I’m behind it all the way. Spring training is a grind as it is, so resting is a good strategy since Wright will get the necessary at-bats needed to get ready.

“Spring training is so long. It’s really for the pitchers’ benefit, to get them stretched out,’’ Wright said earlier this week. “Terry approached me even during the offseason and kind of told me, `Don’t be surprised if in spring training I slow you down a little bit and push you back.’

“The last couple of years I’ve had the abdominal/oblique injuries. So to kind of slow it up this year, to kind of take those baby steps before ramping it up, I think helps me out.’’

Hitters normally get close to 90 at-bats in the spring. If they feel like it isn’t enough, they can always be scheduled in simulated games where they can get up to seven in a game. Wright, as he usually does, shows up several weeks earlier. He’s been taking batting practice since the Super Bowl.

“I felt like I got good work in,’’ Wright said. “I felt I’m a lot more prepared now than I have been in recent spring trainings to enter games, and I think I’ll get a little more out of it.’’

Wright’s work entails hitting, defense and conditioning. It’s been a concentrated effort since the games began; an effort he wouldn’t have been able to do had he been playing all this time.

There has been more intense training this spring compared to last year because then he was playing in the World Baseball Classic.

As always, everything is up for review. If, during the season, Wright feels fresher, then this has been a good routine. If he doesn’t feel as sharp at the start of the season, he can always change next year.

Either way, this is a useful experiment.

 

Mar 03

Mets’ Harvey Gets Valuable Advice From Strasburg

Shelved New York Mets pitcher Matt Harvey has received unsolicited, yet valuable advice, from the opposition. First Roy Halladay, prior to his retirement this winter, spoke with him on whether to undergo Tommy John surgery.

STRASBURG: Advises Harvey (AP)

STRASBURG: Advises Harvey (AP)

Now, Washington Nationals ace Stephen Strasburg, through an interesting column by The New York Post’s Kevin Kernan, counseled him on his rehab. Strasburg, who blew out his elbow in his 2010 rookie season, advised him on the slow rehab process. Strasburg, who shares the same agent as Harvey in Scott Boras, also volunteered to speak with him.

Strasburg said it is a long, slow process, and the idea of taking things day-to-day isn’t always the best method as it can get frustrating.

“You’ll feel great one day, and the next day it’s terrible,’’ Strasburg said. “The best advice I got was, `Look where you were at the start of the month and then at the end of the month. Don’t look at where you were yesterday.’ ’’

It’s kind of like dieting in that stepping on the scale every morning can drive you crazy. There will be setbacks, whether it is a donut or a little tightness one morning.

Veteran pitchers know their bodies, while Harvey is just learning how his responds to pain and injury. There were times Harvey eschewed talking to the trainers last summer when he felt discomfort. Perhaps, this was overestimating his recuperative powers.

“It’s a different beat,’’ Strasburg said about the differences between rehabbing and training. “Recovery is huge, once you learn how long it takes for your body to recover and how often you need to let your body relax and just get back to full health.

“That’s when you can really accomplish the durable things that pitchers do.’’

The Mets suggested it, but haven’t put Harvey not coming back this season in stone. That might be a prudent thing to do because it takes away the carrot of possibly pitching in late September. Harvey long-tossed this morning and doesn’t have a date when he’ll throw off the mound.

This is part of the problem. What date will Harvey throw from the mound? When will he pitch batting practice?

Just say no, and leave 2015 as the target date, not late this summer.