Nov 08

Loose Threads ….

I don’t know why, but I stopped posting this thread. Bad idea on my part, but in conjunction with the blog makeover, I’m bringing it back.

I realize there are times you might have something to say that doesn’t pertain to a recent post. You’ll come here, look around, and if you don’t see something you like, you’ll move on.

I don’t want you to do that. I want you to think of this as your blog, so I want you to post what you want.

If there’s something on your mind, and it could be the NFL, the Knicks, the Rangers, or in Annie Savoy’s case, horse racing, then go for it.

Re-designing the blog will take some time, especially for somebody as computer savvy as me. Again, if there are ideas of things, or features, or graphic presentations you’d like to see, please speak up.

Thanks, JD.

Oct 28

Annie Savoy and Steinbrenner ….

NOTE: Annie Savoy (not her real name) has been a friend of this blog since I started covering the New York Mets. We have corresponded off-line and I have learned of her fascinating background in the world of horse racing. She emailed me this story this morning with the intent of me sharing it with you.

George Steinbrenner and me -

I think this might be the right time to mention one of the times I spoke with George Steinbrenner. It was at the traditional dinner dance held the evening before the 1980 Belmont Stakes, at Belmont Race Track in New York where I was running a horse in the Belmont stakes for the first time.

The Belmont is the third of thoroughbred horse racing’s Triple Crown Races, the first being the Kentucky Derby and the second being the Preakness. These are the class races open only to three year old horses whose prize money to date has made the top ten list for their class.

Ever traditional, the dinner dance attracts the owners, trainers and jockeys who will be on the program for the Belmont Stakes as well as various other noted horsemen and women. It’s a very nice, formal event.

Right before the dancing started, George Steinbrenner who owned Kinsman Stables in Ocala, came over to our table to see me. Always the gentleman, he gave me a hug and said “my wife told me to be sure and wish you luck tomorrow from both of us – she has the same name as you do, so we follow your horses with special interest”. He then took a seat at our table, and talked with everyone there about horses, not baseball.

I’ve never forgotten that night, nor the George Steinbrenner I knew from the racing business and still saw around the major races and Saratoga in August.
Nowadays, George is finding success with another sport in another venue, and I want to wish him good luck this week, and hopefully a return to good health.

He deserves it all.