Aug 19

Great Players Make Little Plays; Mets’ Matt Harvey Did Not In Loss At San Diego

Yes, the New York Mets threw away another Matt Harvey start, but in fairness, the Wonder Pitcher also threw away Sunday’s game in San Diego.

HARVEY: ``Missed it by that much.'' (Getty)

HARVEY: “Missed it by that much.” (Getty)

Harvey has 12 no-decisions and overall the Mets are 13-12 when he starts. Those are telling stats of both parties. For the Mets, again ten games below .500, they are equal opportunity when it comes to disappointing their starters.

Harvey, meanwhile, and he’s the first to admit it, must do more of the little things, and not just pitch longer than the six he did Sunday. Harvey, who has made 35 career starts, desires himself to be a great pitcher, and others have the same projection.

That means not hit a batter with an average barely over the Mendoza Line and field a chopper off the mound.

Harvey gave Sunday’s no-decision and Mets’ defeat a typical “that’s baseball,’’ shrug, but you know he’s steamed because he understands that loss was on him as much as it was on the offense and Pedro Feliciano.

The Mets scored four runs and Harvey has a 2.25 ERA and gave up only two runs. Do the math. The bare numbers point to Feliciano, who gave up a game-winning homer to Will Venable. However, a walk-off game is much more than the play that ended it.

Truly great pitchers don’t hit the .208-hitting Logan Forsythe to open the fifth, and later that inning not come up with Venable’s chopper that drove him home. The chopper would have been the second out and not made Alexi Amarista’s sacrifice fly possible.

Had Harvey made those plays, he would have gotten out of the inning scoreless and picked up his tenth win. That’s probably all he thought about on the flight to Minnesota.

The headline is Venable’s homer, but walk-off games contain numerous plays earlier that mean the difference. The two plays Harvey did not make are similar to those not made by his teammates in his four losses, but more importantly, in the 12 team losses in which he started.

How many plays in those games did Harvey not make, by either giving up a walk, not closing out a hitter or inning, or failing to put down a sacrifice? It’s tight as the Mets lost 11 of those games by a combined 18 runs. There is plenty of responsibility to go around, by Harvey and his teammates. One less bad pitch; one more hit.

Great teams, and great players, make the plays, and “great’’ can’t be applied to, either Harvey or the Mets. Not now, anyway.

This has been a scintillating, yet frustrating season for Harvey, as he sees the greatness that is just beyond his grasp, much like Venable’s chop.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond to them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Apr 04

Mets’ Manager Terry Colliins Planning Line-up Changes

Despite a preference for a consistent line-up, manager Terry Collins knows the importance of keeping every player sharp, which can be hard to do when the weather is cold.

To that regard, Collins pays attention to the match-ups. So, with right-handers scheduled this weekend Collins opted to start Justin Turner at second base today against left-hander Eric Stults.

TURNER: Not sitting today.

TURNER: Not sitting today.

Collins said this was not to be interpreted as a setback for Daniel Murphy, who missed most of spring training with a strained right intercostal muscle. Murphy has shown no signs of being reinjured or in discomfort, although he’s struggling at the plate, going 2-for-9.

Collins also plans to give left-handed hitters Kirk Nieuwenhuis, Mike Baxter and Jordany Valdespin each a start. It is presumed Nieuwenhuis will start in center and Baxter in right, but Valdespin is undecided.

Here’s this afternoon’s batting order against the Padres’ Stults:

Collin Cowgill, CF: Won the center field job by hitting .303 in spring training. Hit a grand slam in the opener, becoming the first Met to slam in his debut.

Justin Turner, 2B: Sustained ankle sprain at the end of spring training, but it was a last-day decision to keep him off the disabled list.

David Wright, 3B: Wright is 2-for-7 on the homestand with two stolen bases. He’s 3-for-6 lifetime against Stults.

Ike Davis, 1B: After striking out four times in the opener he hit a two-run homer last night. Davis hit .327 in spring training so he wasn’t concerned about Monday’s strikeouts.

Marlon Byrd, RF: Has three hits in the first two games, including two with runners in scoring position. Hit 16 homers playing winter ball in Mexico, so there’s some pop in his bat.

Lucas Duda, LF: His on-base percentage was a preseason concern, but he’s reached base five times in the two games, including a mammoth two-run homer last night. After a slow start this spring he finished at .270.

John Buck, C: Making his third straight start, which is surprising considering it is a day game following a night game. But, four hits in two games, including a two-run homer last night kept him in the line-up. The chemistry has been immediate with the starters.

Ruben Tejada, SS: Had a brutal spring hitting .096 in 21 games, but drove in the Mets’ first run of the season with a double. Had five hits in spring training, but two already. Committed an error last night.

Dillon Gee, RHP: Making his first start since undergoing shoulder surgery last July to repair a blocked artery. Went 1-2 with a 5.87 ERA in spring training.

The following is San Diego’s line-up:

Everth Cabrera, SS

Will Venable, RF

Mark Kotsay, LF

Yonder Alonso, 1B

Jedd Gyorko, 3B

Alexi Amarista, 2B

Cameron Maybin, CF

John Baker, C

Eric Stults, LHP