Feb 20

Mets Prospect Cesar Puello Linked To PEDs

This is a good way to get a career started. Mets outfield prospect Cesar Puello is linked to Anthony Bosch’s biogenesis clinic in South Florida, joining such luminaries as Alex Rodriguez, Ryan Braun, Melky Cabrera and former Met prospect Fernando Martinez.

In an e-mail statement, the Mets said: “Because of the ongoing investigation, we have no comment. We refer all questions to Major League Baseball.’’

Puello was injured for much of 2012 while playing for Single-A St. Lucie, and Martinez, you’ll recall, was frequently injured during his unsuccessful tenure with the Mets.

FRANCISCO TO THROW: Reliever Frank Francisco could begin throwing this weekend. He is down with elbow inflammation. If Francisco opens the season on the disabled list, which remains a distinct possibility, it could create a spot for submariner Greg Burke.

NOTEBOOK: Daniel Murphy received a cortisone injection yesterday in New York and is expected to be out seven to ten days. … If Pedro Felciano shows he has something left he could join Josh Edgin as a lefty in the bullpen. Terry Collins feels limited with only one lefty reliever. … The Mets have an intrasquad game Friday and start the exhibition schedule Saturday against Washington.

Sorry for the short post, I’ll have something else for you around noon. Have a great day.

Feb 10

What To Make Of Schilling, Braun And A-Rod

There are several things I want to bring to the blog on a regular basis, something you can depend on. Beginning with a Sunday column centering on the main story of the week.

It is a shame, but the week leading up to the start of spring training was dominated by stories of PEDs. It will never end. There will always be somebody wanting to gain an edge. There will always be cheating. Is it human nature? Yeah, I think so, sadly.

First, Alex Rodriguez. Is anybody really surprised to hear he’s in trouble again? It’s bad enough to be linked again to PEDs, but to come out and say MLB and the Yankees are out to get him? Why not leave well enough alone?

He already hired a big-time lawyer, so he should let his mouthpiece do the talking for him. Sure, the Yankees will try to void his contract, but the MLB Players Association will make it a costly fight. It’s not my money, but if I ran the Yankees I’d go for it, just to send a message.

Rodriguez was not suspended after his admission, so if he’s suspended this time it will be for only 50 games. Bud Selig needs to take that step.

The decision the Yankees must make is whether they believe Rodriguez will ever be healthy enough to be a viable player again. If they decide no, then they might has well try to buy him out or release him outright rather than have him be a distraction for the next five years.

Either way, it could cost them $114 million. And, no way will Rodriguez retire and walk away from that money.

Ryan Braun is proving to be a disappointment and somebody not to be trusted. Yes, he got off on a technicality, but I’m not buying his reasoning his named popped up in the Florida case because he was getting information for his defense. If you’re Braun, you have access to the best lawyers and medical advise available. Why wouldn’t you seek help from a professional instead of going to a shady clinic in a strip mall, one with a checkered history with MLB? If nothing else, wouldn’t the Players Association give him that advice.

Finally, there’s Curt Schilling, who can be a blowhard at times. Including this one. To come out and accuse a member of the Red Sox staff of suggesting he use PEDs while standing in the middle of a crowded clubhouse is absurd.

Although Schilling didn’t mention any names – only that they were no longer with the organization – didn’t mean it couldn’t be figured out who he was talking about. It is highly unlikely, that in a crowded clubhouse, with media access that this would happen. If such a suggestion were made, it would be in private.

 

Jan 30

Yankees Need To Challenge Rodriguez’s Contract

The Yankees, hate them or not, have always set the bar and been the pacesetter.

They must now take a proactive approach with Alex Rodriguez, who is linked to an HGH provider. Rodriguez denies the claim – but lied before – and hired a top-ranked attorney to represent him.

If he’s not guilty, then why the attorney?

If he’s not guilty, then why 16 references to him in documents obtained from the HGH clinic?

The Yankees are on the hook for $114 million over the next five years. Rodriguez has been injured and on a downhill slide for several seasons. To think he’ll rebound into a prolific slugger again is naïve.

Rodriguez admitted using steroids from 2001-2003, but said he never used them with the Yankees or prior to those dates. He had, however, repeatedly denied using them before his confession.

His credibility and believability has long been shot that he’ll never be given the benefit of doubt.

It is easy to say the Yankees made a stupid signing – they should have let him walk when they had the chance – but in fairness they have an argument in claiming they were defrauded.

There seems to be enough evidence to connect Rodriguez to PEDs after his admission. The Yankees extended Rodriguez because they knew the value of him on YES chasing the all-time home run record. In his prime, Rodriguez would have been worth it to them.

However, Rodriguez’s body is breaking down and it isn’t a reach to suggest steroid usage is a contributing factor. If he used HGH while with the Yankees then they aren’t getting the real thing.

That raises an interesting question: What is the real thing with Rodriguez?

We can’t assume it was the Seattle years any longer. We can’t assume it was his early years with the Yankees. I can’t believe it was just a lapse in judgment while in Texas.

What I believe is Rodriguez misled a lot of people, including the Yankees when they signed him. It will be costly, but so is paying off Rodriguez over the next five years and getting nothing.

They must challenge the validity of his contract and attempt to void it, or if nothing else, negotiate a buy out. They need to play hardball.

If they do nothing, Rodriguez will get paid this season (although the Yankees could recoup some of his salary with insurance). Should Rodriguez stay, he will be stung by the booing and it will impact his production. But, he doesn’t care if it doesn’t impact his paycheck.

Through the years the Yankees made several mistakes with Rodriguez. They shouldn’t compound them by not acting now.

Jan 29

Alex Rodriguez In PED Trouble Again

This much we can say about Major League Baseball’s drug policy. It is working. Players are failing tests and being suspended. And, accusations of players using performance-enhancing drugs at an anti-aging clinic in Miami are being investigated.

A-ROD: Not smiling today.

A-ROD: Not smiling today.

Also clear is PEDs won’t go away, with players thinking the risk of being caught and docked 50 games pay is worth it for the performance numbers and an enhanced contract.

There is no greater example than Melky Cabrera, who paid his fine and sat out 50 games and the postseason only to be rewarded with a two-year, $16-million contract.

Perhaps, what should be open for discussion is to strengthen the penalties.

Alex Rodriguez, who admitted using steroids from 2001-2003 before joining the Yankees, yet vehemently denied taking the drug. He finally came clean. To clean your system of drugs permanently, you have to stop taking any, and Rodriguez hasn’t really done that.

He along with Cabrera, Nelson Cruz and Gio Gonzalez, were linked by a Miami News Times report they sold performance-enhancing drugs. Reportedly, Rodriguez used human growth hormones.

In material supplied the paper from an employee at the clinic, Rodriguez’s name appeared 16 times. Rodriguez retained heavyweight lawyer Roy Black, who denied the Yankee third baseman used. Even so, 16 mentions represent more than a coincidence.

The documents indicate Rodriguez’s alleged use of HGH began in 2009, the year he helped carry the Yankees to a World Series title.

Rodriguez, who recently underwent hip surgery (his second), might not be able to play this season. If found guilty of HGH use he won’t be suspended 50 games while on the disabled use, but could be fined 50 games salary.

Rodriguez once took great care in protecting his image, but that doesn’t appear the case anymore after being caught in Toronto with a stripper while still married, high-profile relationships with actresses while at the same time attempting to pick up women from the dugout in the ALCS.

Now comes this. As of now, the man many thought could become the all-time home run champion is hurt, connected to PEDs a second time. Rodriguez has his hired gun, but there is over $100 million at stake for the remainder of his contract. It wouldn’t be surprising if the Yankees explore their legal options under the presumption they were mislead when they signed Rodriguez, thinking he was clean.

Teams have been reluctant to challenge players on this issue because of the strength of the MLB Players Association. Now might be the time to go to court.

Nov 26

Bar Set For David Wright Negotiations

Whatever you hear about what David Wright might be asking or the Mets might be offering, just understand the bar has been set by his contemporaries Evan Longoria and Ryan Zimmerman, Both are close to Wright in terms of age and production. Just not salary.

The Tampa Bay Rays, long known as a team with low payroll agreed to a contract extension over the weekend with Longoria for $100 million over ten years. The deal includes the same terms of his current contract through 2016, then adds an additional ten years. There is an option for 2013.

LONGORIA: Sets the bar for Wright (AP)

Who knows if the Rays will be in Tampa by then, but wherever they go, Longoria will be with them.

Then there is Zimmerman of the Washington Nationals, who, after moving into their new park have become big spenders. Zimmerman, who is a long-time friend of Wright’s, signed an extension before spring training last year for $100 million over six years, including the final two years of his current deal plus four more seasons.

Arguments can be made both are better recently than Wright, who after two down seasons bounced back in 2012.

Longoria is the face of the Rays as Wright is to the Mets, but has better power numbers. He is 27 and Wright will be 30 five days before Christmas. Zimmerman is 28.

Remembering Wright is roughly three years older than Longoria and a year older than Zimmerman, he has 204 career homers with an average of 26 a season. Longoria has 130 with an average of 33. If he maintains his current pace, by the time he reaches Wright’s age, he could have 230 career homers.

Zimmerman has 153 career homers, averaging 25 a season.

The Mets maintain re-signing Wright is their priority, but seem close vested as to what they are willing to spend or how long a deal they might give. A ten-year deal like Longoria’s puts Wright close to 40 at the end, and likely well into the downside of his career, much like Alex Rodriguez of the Yankees.

The last four years have been below Wright’s standards and include trips to the disabled list for a variety of injuries, all sustained by playing hard. That includes lost time from the Matt Cain beaning, which can’t be termed an “age related” injury.

All that will be considered in the Mets’ offer.

Statistically, the three are fairly even with Longoria having the highest upside. Given that, I don’t see how the Mets could justify anything less than $100 million and six years, although recently I suggested they go $100 million over five years.

The years might vary, but $100 million appears to be the ceiling. Do you see the Mets setting the bar higher?

I didn’t think so.

Longoria’s contract will be argued as the bar for third basemen. It shouldn’t vary by much. The only real question is: Do the Mets want to spend the money?