Jan 08

No Doubt Tom Glavine Deserves Hall Of Fame

We will know today whether Tom Glavine, whose brilliant career included desert with the New York Mets is to be voted into the Hall of Fame.

He got my vote, and to me is a slamdunk Hall of Famer. I’ll never top believing 300 victories is not an automatic ticket to Cooperstown, even if he didn’t get one in the 2007 season finale when he didn’t get out of the first inning against the Marlins at Shea Stadium.

GLAVINE: Deserves the Hall of Fame/.

GLAVINE: Deserves the Hall of Fame/.

I can’t understand after 305 career victories while there’s such vile in the New York area, from fans and media alike, against Glavine simply because he spit the bit that one start and his choice of words later that day.

Glavine said he wasn’t “devastated,’’ by the loss, and indeed, that is too serious a word. Glavine had nothing to be devastated about that day.

Too many Mets fans wanted Glavine to jump off a bridge after that game.  We should always remember there’s a different mentality between fans, players and the media. Fans hold a sense of drama and emotion players don’t posses.

Glavine was blessed with a long and lucrative career that should get him into the Hall of Fame. As far as we know, he and his family are in good health. Glavine doesn’t have to work a day the rest of his life, and can spend as much time as he wants on the golf course with buddies Greg Maddux – who should be voted in today – and John Smoltz, who is arguably another Hall of Famer.

Yes, devastated should be reserved for those who lost more than a baseball game, even if it meant missing the playoffs. It was a poor choice of words, which Glavine later admitted. Too many Mets’ fans and New York media were bent out of shape by semantics.

Glavine also admitted his last start was a disaster, of which there can be no debate.

Many have written Glavine was a bust during his five-year career with the Mets, but his free-agent signing after the 2002 season had his benefits and wasn’t without merit.

The Mets were two years removed from the World Series at the time and were sliding while the cross-town Yankees continued to reach October. Manager Bobby Valentine was on the way out and they were starting over.

Glavine represented a change in the Mets’ free-agent culture. They missed signing Alex Rodriguez – fortunately for them – and busted out on Mo Vaughn and Roberto Alomar.

Glavine started 36 games and won 18 in 2002, the year before signing with the Mets, and won 21 in 2000. He was still a viable pitcher when he signed with the Mets, and as a high-profile free-agent, he helped pave the way for Carlos Beltran and Pedro Martinez to sign in Flushing.

No, the Mets’ plan didn’t pan out, but go easy on Glavine. In his five years with the Mets, he was a two-time All-Star and was 61-56 with a 3.97 ERA. Of the 164 games Glavine started for the Mets, there were 56 in which he either lost or took a no-decision while giving up three or fewer runs. That’s 34 percent of his starts.

Glavine didn’t make it out of the first inning that gloomy Sunday on the last day of the 2007, but a lousy start shouldn’t keep him out, and there are New York writers who because of it didn’t give him a vote.

I also know numerous Mets’ fans that because of that day, despise Glavine. That’s just not fair.

In all fairness, Glavine was lousy that day, but that year the Mets blew a seven-game lead with 17 remaining. Only a historic collapse made that game even matter.

With a little run and bullpen support, Glavine, who had little of each, might have won 25 more victories to put him at 330.

That’s conjecture, but what is not was a superb career with 305 victories. Three-hundred has always been a ticket to the Hall of Fame and shouldn’t now.

Glavine deserves this honor.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

 

 

 

 

Dec 14

Cano: Good Player, But He Is Still What’s Wrong With Sports

Robinson Cano’s orchestrated dinner with the New York Mets was clearly transparent, made even more so after his introductory press conference in Seattle. It was only an indicator of things to come from this childish man.

Bottom line: Cano wanted to stay in New York, but at his price, and in the end his price is all that mattered to him. It is impossible to do business when you give nothing back in the negotiations. If you don’t give back they cease being negotiations.

CANO: Good riddance.

CANO: Good riddance.

Cano is a marvelously talented baseball player, but a flawed individual. He might be a five-tool player, but on the human level, none of his tools include discretion, loyalty, common sense or rational thinking. We do know Cano has streaks of arrogance, delusional thinking and greed in his persona. He also has an annoying sense of entitlement.

“I didn’t feel respect. I didn’t get respect from them and I didn’t see any effort,’’ Cano said with a straight face when asked about the Yankees.

Being offered $175 million over seven years was plenty of respect countered Yankees president Randy Levine. Look, Levine and the Yankees don’t need anybody to fight their battles, but Cano was shown respect and his hissy fit needs to be addressed, because if nothing else it is a display of all that is wrong with today’s professional athlete.

From the outset, $300 million over ten years, was over the top, but it never hurts to ask because somebody might bite. However, when it became apparent Cano didn’t want to budge, you knew he wouldn’t stay in New York and the Yankees would be better off without him.

With Derek Jeter at the end of this career, and Alex Rodriguez in PED limbo, Jacoby Ellsbury will not be the difference. They need pitching and to shed some of its unproductive payroll – Mark Teixeira for one – and start rebuilding. The money earmarked Cano will be better invested elsewhere.

It was a business decision for Cano to state his negotiating objectives of money and years. It is also a business decision for the Yankees to say they no longer want to give ten-year contracts to players over 30 years old. Cano wants us to respect his business decision, yet he can’t respect the Yankees’ right to do the same. Just delusional and out of touch with reality is Cano.

I don’t begrudge Cano the right to have money as his motivation, but distasteful is his attitude. The only party showing a lack of respect in this issue is Cano, towards the Yankees, to the fans, and to his profession.

You made a choice, now live with it and don’t bash the Yankees on the way out. They didn’t criticize your choice; don’t criticize theirs.

Perhaps the greatest complaints people have about athletes is their disconnect from reality, their disregard about others, and when they don’t hustle. Cano violates our sensibilities by doing all three.

I believe a player is worth what his employer is willing to pay him. In that vein, Cano is worth $240 million to the Mariners. He’s just not worth $240 million to the Yankees, which is their right to determine.

Nobody has the right to say $240 million is too much, because who among you would turn it down?

But, we have the right to be irritated at Cano’s lack of touch with reality, which is insulting to those struggling to make ends meet or have been out of work.

“I was looking for a contract where I would just be able play and focus on the game and wouldn’t wonder when I’m 37, 38 would I have a job one day,’’ was what he tried to pass off as logic for his decision.

Seriously?

If at the end of the $175 million he would have gotten from the Yankees, if healthy and had he not worn out his welcome, he would have had another deal. Please don’t tell us after $175 million you’d be that insecure as to worry about your future. It is insulting to all those who buy tickets to watch you play or purchase your jersey.

Also insulting is your agent, Jay Z, who operating on your behalf, after accepting $240 million from Seattle went back to the Yankees with the request of $235 million over ten years.

It says you really don’t want to be in Seattle. How should they feel about that?

The Yankees are better off without him, which is something Seattle will find out eventually. At 3,000 miles away, it isn’t far away far enough.

In New York, there are too many apologists for your style and attitude. They say you’re entitled to take plays off, to jog down to first base because you’re usually in the line-up and you’re a good player. But, you don’t have that right. Cano has been given a gift of talent, but when you half-ass it to first base, you insult the fan and your profession. Not hustling is never justified.

They let you get away with it, and in the end it had to figure in the Yankees’ thinking. Deep down, they don’t want a dog to be the face of their franchise. You got a pass on that in New York, but they know how to boo in Seattle, and you’ll hear them soon enough.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Nov 25

Mets Set Free Agent Market The Wrong Way

New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson called the free agent market “robust,’’ but he’s a contributor in making it so.

We all know Robinson Cano and Jacoby Ellsbury – both good players will get their money – but they aren’t the ones driving up the market.

Salaries aren’t driven by the stars getting large salaries, but when mediocre and questionable talent are given huge paydays.

The bar gets set when Chris Young – thanks to Alderson – gets $7.25 million. The market is also influenced when a PED user such as Jhonny Peralta gets a four-year, $52-million contract from St. Louis. For all the talk about the Mets being interested, it is just as well they didn’t sink that kind of money into player whose numbers are suspect because of PEDs.

So please, I don’t want to hear Alderson moan about the high salary demands when he helped create the environment that leads to those demads. That includes being in the market for a PED user like Peralta.

Retiring commissioner Bud Selig is going after Alex Rodriguez though questionable methods, yet his legacy will also include large contracts for guys like Peralta.

Reliever David Aardsma tweeted over the weekend after learning of the Peralta deal with the Cardinals: “Apparently getting suspended for PEDs means you get a raise. What’s stopping anybody from doing it? … I had 2 major surgeries in 5 months and made it back clean, nothing pisses me off more than guys that cheat and get raises for doing so.’’

He’s right.

I don’t know how you can regulate teams against signing PED users. It’s their money and they are the ones taking the risk.

So many players have benefitted from using PEDs, and regardless of whether MLB nails Rodriguez or not, that will continue.

Which makes me wonder what’s Selig’s real objective?

 

Nov 11

Yankees’ Curtis Granderson Spurs Offer; Mets Could Have Interest

Not surprisingly, many of the significant players of interest to the New York Mets who declined the qualifying offers from their respective teams. With the starting point at $14.1 million, the Mets know their beginning parameters.

One player is Curtis Granderson, who, because of several hand injuries, was limited to seven homers, 15 RBI and a .229 average and a .317 on-base percentage. During his 10-year career, Granderson has averaged 30 homers, 83 RBI, a .340 on-base percentage and a .828 OPS, numbers that would fill the Mets’ need for a power-hitting corner outfielder.

GRANDERSON: Could the Mets snare him?

GRANDERSON: Could the Mets snare him?

That includes two 40-homer seasons over the past three years, but a qualifier must be the cozy dimensions of Yankee Stadium and hitting in a line-up with Alex Rodriguez and Mark Teixeira. He won’t have nearly that kind of protection in the line-up.

Another red flag must be his hand injuries and if they snapped his wrist strength needed to turn on a pitch.

Granderson said in a radio interview last week he could accept a one-year deal and try again next winter. However, that doesn’t mean it would be for $14.1 million.

The Mets could have serious competition for Granderson from the Yankees, who need to upgrade their offense in anticipation of not knowing if they’ll have Rodriguez, questions about Teixeira’s health and wondering what they’ll get from Derek Jeter.

The Mets are reluctant to offer more than three years, but should they go four years – which appers the magic number for many players – Granderson would be 36 at the end of the deal which might have him still in his prime. Plus, Granderson has a track record of greater production than Chin-Soo Choo.

The dollars might not be a detriment to signing Granderson, but the red flags are his health and the wonder of what he could produce in a new league and at Citi Field. Another is if Granderson is only a left-handed hitting Jason Bay.

All legitimate concerns.

Nov 09

Yankees’ Brendan Ryan Could Be Stop Gap Answer At Shortstop

The New York Mets are in the market for a shortstop, but there are red flags with the biggest names on the market.

Stephen Drew, 31, was given the $14.1-million qualifying offer by the Red Sox, which might be too pricey for the Mets’ blood. Reportedly, Drew wants a multi-year deal, but the Mets are reluctant to get bogged down on a long-term deal, considering what they’ve gone through over the past few years.

The Mets will also get competition from the Yankees, who like Drew’s left-handed bat in that bandbox of a stadium. The Yankees also need a shortstop because of the uncertainty surrounding Derek Jeter. There’s also the possibility of Jeter moving to third base if Alex Rodriguez is suspended.

Rafael Furcal, 36, is coming off an injury and a two-year, $14-million contract with the Cardinals.

There’s also 32-year-old Jhonny Peralta, who is coming off a three-year, $16.75 million contract with Detroit. Peralta has an offensive upside, but as with outfielder Nelson Cruz from Texas, there’s the specter of using performance-enhancing drugs. How much of their production is from them or the chemicals? It’s a legitimate concern.

Finally, there’s the Yankees’ Brendan Ryan, who made $3.25 million last year. Ryan would likely come at a reasonable salary and might not ask for the length of contract demanded by Drew or Peralta.

The Mets don’t know if they’ll have Ruben Tejada, who is recovering from a broken leg, and even when he was healthy last season he didn’t produce at the plate or in the field.