Jan 26

Yankees Ready To Spar With Rodriguez

The Yankees fired an interesting salvo in their on-going war with disgraced slugger Alex Rodriguez.

After refusing to hold a “clear-the-air’’ meeting with Rodriguez, the Yankees are reportedly bracing their legal defense to prevent him from collecting on any of the $30 million in bonuses he would get from his 2007 marketing agreement with the team.

RODRIGUEZ: Facing more legal hassles.

RODRIGUEZ: Facing more legal hassles.

Good for them, even though they are sure to lose.

With six more homers he will tie Willie Mays (660) for fourth place on the career list, which would be worth $6 million. He would also get $6 million for tying Babe Ruth (714), Hank Aaron (755), Barry Bonds (762) and passing Bonds.

Naturally, the basis for their argument is Rodriguez’s involvement with steroids. It would be a worthwhile fight except for several flaws, namely the Yankees knew what they were getting into when they signed him, and then re-signed him.

However, their case would carry greater weight if they were to sue him for money already paid and to get out of the contract entirely, which has three years and $61 million remaining.

Proving they had no knowledge about steroids would be difficult because it is largely assumed Major League Baseball was aware of steroid use as far back as 1998, when we were “treated,’’ to the home run race between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa.

Going this way would undoubtedly reopen old wounds and possibly create new ones. Personally, I would like to see them go that route regardless of the fallout because maybe all the truth would come out.

 

Dec 20

One More Time: Tulowitzki Not Happening

OK, one more time: Troy Tulowitzki is not coming to the Mets.

Yes, yes, yes … there have been reports this week the Mets and Rockies are talking. I am sure they’ve spoken since the Winter Meetings. They could be exchanging holiday greetings, or talking about the weather, or trading fantasy football players, but serious dialogue about Tulowitzki isn’t one of the topics.

TULOWITZKI: Keep on dreaming.

TULOWITZKI: Keep on dreaming.

To understand why it won’t happen one must first ask:  Why do the Rockies want to deal him?

It begins with health, and here there aren’t any guarantees. A healthy Tulowitzki would be great to have, but he’s coming off hip surgery that puts his power potential in question. The Mets don’t have to look any further than across town at Alex Rodriguez to understand how a bum hip makes even great players, well, bums.

Couple his questionable health with the $118 million he is owed over the next six years, and you begin to comprehend why the Rockies want to start over. Sure, they’ll have to assume some of his contract to get another team to take him off their hands, but not nearly enough to make the Mets bite.

Having played at least 140 games only once in the past five years makes him a high-risk gamble. Sandy Alderson has spent his tenure as the Mets’ general manager paring down payroll. That’s why he was brought here.

Say what you want about the Wilpons and their budget, but understand that’s not going to change. It just won’t, and it especially won’t with a high-risk gamble with the cost of one or two of their young stud pitchers, even if one of them isn’t Matt Harvey.

The Rockies are concerned about his injury history, salary and want a talented bunch of prospects in return. Given that, those are the same reasons the Mets should run away.

But you say, look at his numbers at Citi Field. OK, I will. Let’s see, five homers, 11 RBI, a .438 batting average and 1.368 OPS in 58 plate appearances over 14 games. Hmm, well, that is impressive, but it’s not the ballpark as much as it is the Mets’ pitching he’s faced over the years.

Understand, he won’t be facing that pitching if he comes here. If you’re hung up on seeing Tulowitzki play at Citi Field, the Rockies will be in for the start of a four-game series, Aug. 10.

Plenty of tickets are available.

Feb 08

We May Have Seen The Last Of Alex Rodriguez

With Alex Rodriguez’s decision to drop his Triple Play lawsuits against Major League Baseball, Commissioner Bud Selig and the Players Association, it is extremely possible we have seen the last of the player who one time seemed destined to hold all the records.

In doing so, Rodriguez will accept the 162-game suspension that will cost him the 2014 season and $25 million.

RODRIGUEZ: Going, going gone.

RODRIGUEZ: Going, going gone.

While the reaction of Rodriguez’s decision has been positive, speculation is the suit was dropped because he was throwing good money after bad. He would stand to lose $10 million in legal fees.

While I have no doubt Rodriguez did something, nobody has said to what extent. I still call into question Major League Baseball’s tactics in the Biogenesis case, which could cost Rodriguez his career.

Rodriguez can return for 2015, and indicates he wants a post-playing career in baseball. Good luck with that … it definitely wouldn’t have happened had he followed through with the suit.

Rodriguez will be 40 in 2015, and after being away from the game for a year, one has to wonder how much he’ll lose. He could spend the time rehabbing and getting his surgically-repaired hips stronger.

Still, I don’t know if it will do any good for his career. The Yankees are obligated to pay him $62 million, but in what capacity?

Will they bring him back and deal with that distraction for two more years, or will they simply buy him out?

I’m betting the latter, thinking we’ll never see Rodriguez play another major league game again.

 

Jan 11

Rodriguez Suspension Reduced; Case Not Closed

As usually is the case with Alex Rodriguez, there is no last word. Just because arbitrator Frederic Horowitz reduced his unprecedented 211-game suspension for violation of MLB’s drug policy to 162 games.

Up next is a date in federal court. After that, who knows? Could this go to the Supreme Court?

Rodriguez won’t let this thing go, and he says it is more than about the $25 million missing 2014 will cost him.

While how Rodriguez has handled himself hasn’t endeared himself to many, and because he previously admitted using steroids prior to MLB’s PED policy, there’s little reason to believe he hasn’t used them since.

That’s not the issue.

The issue, says Rodriguez, is about fairness and his legacy. There is some degree of truth to the fairness argument.

According to the drug policy, Rodriguez’s admission wouldn’t be used against him. And, since there was no failed drug test, where did Bud Selig get the original 211 games. Seems like an arbitrary figure only because it is.

The first offense is 50 games, followed by 100. The first offense doesn’t have to be a failed test, but could be something like being linked to steroids, such as appearing on the Biogenesis list.

Even so, 13 other players, including Ryan Braun, were also on the Biogenesis list as supplied by founder Anthony Bosch. Braun failed a drug test last year, but got off on a technicality. According to the agreement, Braun would get 100 games, but was only tagged for 65.

Everybody else got 50. But, Rodriguez? He got 211.

Selig never explained his reasoning, nor did he seem fit to explain in during the arbitration process. Selig wasn’t obligated to appear, but if he felt so strongly about his decision, he should have been there to tell his story.

Part of that story, undoubtedly, would have been to explain how Selig and Major League Baseball obtained its evidence, which was purchased from Bosch after he refused to relinquish his materials.

Part of MLB’s grievance against Rodriguez was he attempted to do the same, but with the intent of destroying the documents.

So, MLB is punishing Rodriguez for trying to do what it did. Seems highly hypocritical.

How Selig arrived at 211 games is arbitrary and smells of the witch-hunt Rodriguez asserts.

We know the steroid era was borne out of MLB turning its head to what was going on in the game – giving tacit approval to the needle, the clear and the cream – as to put fannies in the seats to watch phony home run races.

It seemed like every time Rodriguez flaunted Selig’s authority it cost him games. There was nothing consistent to how Selig dealt with Rodriguez as opposed to the others given up by Bosch.

This inconsistency, coupled with MLB’s buying out of Bosch, smacks of bias and unfairness. That the arbitrator cut into Selig’s 211 games indicates he felt the original penalty was over the top.

Look, I want steroids out of the game as much as anybody. More than most. But, I want it done the right way and I don’t believe MLB has handled the Rodriguez case the right way.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jan 08

No Doubt Tom Glavine Deserves Hall Of Fame

We will know today whether Tom Glavine, whose brilliant career included desert with the New York Mets is to be voted into the Hall of Fame.

He got my vote, and to me is a slamdunk Hall of Famer. I’ll never top believing 300 victories is not an automatic ticket to Cooperstown, even if he didn’t get one in the 2007 season finale when he didn’t get out of the first inning against the Marlins at Shea Stadium.

GLAVINE: Deserves the Hall of Fame/.

GLAVINE: Deserves the Hall of Fame/.

I can’t understand after 305 career victories while there’s such vile in the New York area, from fans and media alike, against Glavine simply because he spit the bit that one start and his choice of words later that day.

Glavine said he wasn’t “devastated,’’ by the loss, and indeed, that is too serious a word. Glavine had nothing to be devastated about that day.

Too many Mets fans wanted Glavine to jump off a bridge after that game.  We should always remember there’s a different mentality between fans, players and the media. Fans hold a sense of drama and emotion players don’t posses.

Glavine was blessed with a long and lucrative career that should get him into the Hall of Fame. As far as we know, he and his family are in good health. Glavine doesn’t have to work a day the rest of his life, and can spend as much time as he wants on the golf course with buddies Greg Maddux – who should be voted in today – and John Smoltz, who is arguably another Hall of Famer.

Yes, devastated should be reserved for those who lost more than a baseball game, even if it meant missing the playoffs. It was a poor choice of words, which Glavine later admitted. Too many Mets’ fans and New York media were bent out of shape by semantics.

Glavine also admitted his last start was a disaster, of which there can be no debate.

Many have written Glavine was a bust during his five-year career with the Mets, but his free-agent signing after the 2002 season had his benefits and wasn’t without merit.

The Mets were two years removed from the World Series at the time and were sliding while the cross-town Yankees continued to reach October. Manager Bobby Valentine was on the way out and they were starting over.

Glavine represented a change in the Mets’ free-agent culture. They missed signing Alex Rodriguez – fortunately for them – and busted out on Mo Vaughn and Roberto Alomar.

Glavine started 36 games and won 18 in 2002, the year before signing with the Mets, and won 21 in 2000. He was still a viable pitcher when he signed with the Mets, and as a high-profile free-agent, he helped pave the way for Carlos Beltran and Pedro Martinez to sign in Flushing.

No, the Mets’ plan didn’t pan out, but go easy on Glavine. In his five years with the Mets, he was a two-time All-Star and was 61-56 with a 3.97 ERA. Of the 164 games Glavine started for the Mets, there were 56 in which he either lost or took a no-decision while giving up three or fewer runs. That’s 34 percent of his starts.

Glavine didn’t make it out of the first inning that gloomy Sunday on the last day of the 2007, but a lousy start shouldn’t keep him out, and there are New York writers who because of it didn’t give him a vote.

I also know numerous Mets’ fans that because of that day, despise Glavine. That’s just not fair.

In all fairness, Glavine was lousy that day, but that year the Mets blew a seven-game lead with 17 remaining. Only a historic collapse made that game even matter.

With a little run and bullpen support, Glavine, who had little of each, might have won 25 more victories to put him at 330.

That’s conjecture, but what is not was a superb career with 305 victories. Three-hundred has always been a ticket to the Hall of Fame and shouldn’t now.

Glavine deserves this honor.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos