Mar 05

Understanding Lack Of Urgency In Signing Pitchers

Mets GM Sandy Alderson said there haven’t been any talks with their young rotation for long-term contracts, but added that doesn’t mean there can’t be negotiations later in spring training. But, if it doesn’t happen this spring there shouldn’t be a cause for great concern.

DeGROM: It's just business (GETTY)

DeGROM: It’s just business (GETTY)

I’ve long liked the idea of the Mets signing their young pitchers to long-term contracts. My thinking is the price will eventually increase so it makes sense to lock them up early for the sake of cost certainty. It makes sense, but I can also understand why Alderson hasn’t been more aggressive in that area.

It starts with a sense of urgency, and frankly there is none. Matt Harvey won’t be a free agent until after the 2018 season. Jacob deGrom won’t be eligible until 2020, which is four years away, and Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz until 2021.

“I think that’s something that everyone needs to keep in mind,” Alderson told reporters. “There seems to be a fixation on some of our players and the brevity or length of their time with the Mets. I all of these cases, they’re going to be with us for a while. From that standpoint, is there urgency? From our standpoint, is there urgency?”

There’s time to do something and yes the price can increase. Conversely, there’s always the possibility of injuries and underperforming. That’s always the chance you take when you sign players to long-term contracts.

On the flip side, the Mets are taking a chance of alienating these pitchers if they continue to do things as they did with deGrom. Until a player becomes arbitration eligible, a team can assign a player his salary, which is what the Mets did when they issued him a $607,000 contract.

The conventional wisdom is the team holds the hammer early in a player’s career, and the athlete puts the screws to the team later on. If a team plays hardball all the time, it could come back to bite them.

For now, deGrom told reporters all is well with the team.

“That’s the business side of the game,” deGrom said. “That’s why I hired my agents. I feel like I have some of the best in the business. It was a business decision that we decided to make. We have great respect for the Mets and the system that they have, and I feel like I have a great relationship with them.

“As I’ve said before, I love playing here. And I want to be in this uniform for a long time. It was just a decision based on the business side of the game.”

It’s also the business side when the player takes it to the team in the arbitration and free-agent process.

Dec 04

Alderson Diagnosed With Cancer; Will Not Attend Winter Meetings

The Mets announced Friday GM Sandy Alderson has been diagnosed a treatable form of and will undergo chemotherapy for the next eight to 12 weeks.

The cancer was detected when Alderson underwent a medical procedure three weeks ago.

“Surgery was performed at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York and as a result of that procedure, the doctors confirmed that Sandy has cancer,’’ Mets chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon said in a statement. “The doctors believe and have told Sandy that the cancer is very treatable and are optimistic about a full recovery.’’

Wilpon said Alderson will not attend next week’s Winter Meetings and will receive treatment at Sloan Kettering.

Assistant general manager John Ricco, and J.P. Ricciardi and Paul DePodesta will go to the meetings with the following priorities: sign infielder Ben Zobrist; obtain a center fielder; and restock the bullpen.

Nov 09

Mets Matters: Alderson To Miss GM Meetings For Medical Procedure

Mets GM Sandy Alderson will undergo a medical procedure this week and will not attend the general manager’s meetings in Florida. The club will be represented in Florida by assistant GMs John Ricco, J.P. Ricciardi and Paul DePodesta.

mets-matters logo“He had a medical procedure that was scheduled for after the season ended,’’ Ricco told reporters. “Because of the playoff run, it got pushed back, and kept getting pushed and pushed – obviously for good reason. And so he was going to have it done this week.’’

Ricco would not give specifics about the procedure or whether Alderson’s fainting spell last week was related.

“At some point we’ll have more to say. I don’t want to portray that there’s something extremely urgent about it,’’ Ricco said. “He feels comfortable we’re down here. We’re a pretty veteran group. We’re capable of handling it.’’

Even had Alderson been present the Mets weren’t expected to be anything in Boca Raton, Fla., as the GM Meetings are usually for exploratory purposes, with real activity occurring in early December at the Winter Meetings.

HALL OF FAME BALLOTS MAILED: Hall of Fame ballots were mailed Monday, with Mike Piazza a headliner.

A candidate must appear on 75 percent of the ballots. Piazza appeared on 69.9 percent last year. Every candidate who garnered 69 percent of the vote were eventually elected within two years.

Those players on the new ballot include: Garret Anderson, Brad Ausmus, Jeff Bagwell, Barry Bonds, Luis Castillo, Roger Clemens, David Eckstein, Jim Edmonds, Nomar Garciaparra, Troy Glaus, Ken Griffey, Mark Grudzielanek, Mike Hampton, Trevor Hoffman, Jason Kendall, Jeff Kent, Mike Lowell, Edgar Martinez, Fred McGriff, Mark McGwire, Mike Mussina, Piazza, Tim Raines, Curt Schilling, Gary Sheffield, Lee Smith, Sammy Sosa, Mike Sweeney, Alan Trammell, Billy Wagner, Larry Walker and Randy Winn.

In addition to Piazza, those with Mets’ ties include: Castillo, Hampton, Kent, Sheffield and Wagner.

NO SURGERY FOR LAGARES: Ricco said center fielder Juan Lagares will not have to undergo Tommy John surgery on his right elbow.

Lagares’ throwing was definitely an issue last season, but instead of surgery he is expected to be put on a strengthening program.

Nov 07

Expect No Trades, No Limits On Mets Starters In 2016

Expect no trades or innings restrictions on the Mets’ 2016 starting rotation. With the anticipated departure of outfielder Yoenis Cespedes, there have been numerous reports the Mets might explore obtaining a bat in exchange for Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz.

HARVEY: Expect no limits in 2016. (AP)

HARVEY: Expect no limits in 2016. (AP)

The Mets attempted to trade Zack Wheeler, who spent the season on the disabled list following Tommy John surgery, but that deal fell through.

“I can’t see it happening,’’ Alderson said this week of a possible trade among the four who were on the postseason roster. “You never know what comes up. But I think it’s unlikely.’’

The Mets attempted to trade Jon Niese in the past and are expected to do so again this winter. If not, he could stay in the rotation until Wheeler is ready to come off the disabled list in July.

If they are able to trade Niese, Logan Verrett or Rafael Montero could slide into the rotation until Wheeler is ready.

The concept of innings restrictions became a hot issue in the second half of the season, but manager Terry Collins said that should not become a topic in 2016.

An innings jump of 30 to 40 innings is considered normal, and is that turns out to be the case all the starters should exceed 200 innings, with Matz reaching about 190.

“We went into the second half of the season with pitching issues that had to be handled and had to be dealt with,’’ Collins said. “Hopefully next year, with what these guys have gone through this year, that won’t be the case. It might be, ‘Hey, look, we want to skip a guy here.’ ’’

 

Nov 05

Extending My Apologies To Sandy Alderson

In my coverage of the Mets, from my days as a newspaper reporter to this blog, I have been a proponent for being stand-up. I have applauded David Wright, Daniel Murphy, ,manager Terry Collins and others for accepting responsibility when things go wrong.

ALDERSON: You have reason to smile. (AP)

ALDERSON: You have reason to smile. (AP)

And, I have been critical of Matt Harvey for not always doing the same.

Given that, I must hold myself to the same standards and admit I was wrong on GM Sandy Alderson on several issues this year. Among them:

* Not having a concrete plan for Harvey as to his innings limit, or at least, not being open with it.

* For his reluctance to promote outfield prospect Michael Conforto from the minor leagues when the team was in a woeful hitting slump.

* For seemingly dragging his feet on bringing in a bat at the trade deadline. And, when the Carlos Gomez trade with Milwaukee fell through, Alderson deserves considerable credit for despite the rapidly approaching deadline, kicking the tires on Jay Bruce from Cincinnati before landing Yoenis Cespedes.

The bottom line: No Cespedes, no playoffs.

Alderson told us to be patient and rewarded us.

When the Harvey news broke, Alderson went with the flow and worked with the appropriate parties to make sure it wasn’t a lingering problem. And, well Conforto made the most with his opportunity and in addition to gaining valuable experience, helped the Mets to the World Series.

He’s expected to be a starter next season and the Mets are far ahead because they already have a book on him. In both cases, Alderson did what he was supposed to do, which was act in a manner that made the Mets better. Nobody can ask for more.

There’s no rest for him as he’ll be attending the general managers meetings next week. Next year has already begun and with it a myriad of issues, from rebuilding a bullpen, and making hard decisions on Cespedes, Murphy, the middle infield and ascertaining where things are with Wright’s back.

I’ll voice my opinion as I always do, but for now, Alderson deserves to savor this season without my two cents.

So, cheers to you Mr. Alderson for making me, and countless Mets fans, eat our words. Your instincts about this team were correct and I was wrong. You had one hell of a year.

Congratulations.