Jul 06

What Should Mets Do At Deadline?

Let’s assume the Mets have already decided they will be sellers at the trade deadline. And, let’s carry that assumption a step further and say GM Sandy Alderson will be aggressive.

What then, are the Mets’ options and how should Alderson play this?

GSELLMAN: Don't trade him. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Don’t trade him. (AP)

IDENTIFY TOP ASSETS: The Mets have four players that should draw considerable interest: Addison Reed, Jerry Blevins, Lucas Duda, Jay Bruce and Curtis Granderson.

Reed: Relievers always draw interest this time of year, and if the Mets are on the fence as to bringing back Reed in 2018, Alderson should get a lot of calls on him. The big gamble is that if they trade Reed and Jeurys Familia doesn’t return from his injury the Mets could be closer shopping.

Blevins: A lefty reliever who can also close is also very valuable. The concern here that Terry Collins might have burned out Blevins, thereby reducing his value.

Duda: This guy has remarkable, but also streaky power. For a team needing left power, or a first baseman, or a pinch-hitter, Duda fills those needs. The Mets are high on Dominic Smith, so bringing back Duda might be a stretch.

Bruce: He’s having an All-Star caliber season, so how can a team needing a power hitting outfielder not be interested? The risk in dealing Bruce is that if Yoenis Cespedes comes up lame again next year the Mets will be shopping for a bat again.

Granderson: If the asking price for Bruce is deemed too high, Granderson could be a good Plan B. However, Granderson has been hot over the past month which could draw more interest than otherwise expected.

GIVE TIME TO THE DESERVING: Michael Conforto, who is an All-Star by the way, T.J. Rivera and Wilmer Flores always seem to get the wrong end of the stick. They need to play and play every day. We know Jose Reyes and Asdrubal Cabrera won’t be with the Mets next season, so do we really need to see more of them?

DON’T GIVE UP YOUNG PITCHING: Robert Gsellman and Seth Lugo haven’t pitched to expectations, but unless the Mets are blown away they should hold on to both. With all the pitching injuries the Mets have experienced this season – all but Jacob deGrom have been on the disabled list – they’d be wise to keep their depth.

Jul 04

Breakfast With The Mets

If we’re up early to watch the Mets, they damn well better be ready to play. And, Collins better be ready to manage his bullpen. … A lot of things have gone wrong for the Mets this season, and one of them is the pitching. Too many walks. Part of that has to be on Dan Warthen, who has been given a pass.

ALDERSON: Has done bad job. (AP)

ALDERSON: Has done bad job. (AP)

GM Sandy Alderson put together the bullpen on the cheap. The pitchers are coached by Warthen and Terry Collins decides when they go into the game. So far, it has been a trifecta of ineptitude. I understand injuries happen, but who decided to let Noah Syndergaard get muscle-bound and let him start without an MRI? That would be Alderson.

After Warthen said Matt Harvey would be full strength until late May/early June, who put him on the Opening Day roster when he should have stayed back for extended spring training? Why, that would be Alderson, too.

While we’re at it, who let Justin Turner and Daniel Murphy walk? Right again. That’s Sandy Alderson.

And who, as Kevin Kernan of the Post recently wrote, passed on drafting Corey Seager and Cody Bellinger? Hmm, could it possibly be Alderson? Right again.

If you think I’m too hard on Alderson, this is just the beginning.

Happy July 4th all. Enjoy the day with your friends and families, and the Mets if you want some agita.

 

Jul 03

Player Mets Avoid Playing, Conforto, Is All-Star

The first thing I thought of when I heard Michael Conforto would be the Mets’ representative in the All-Star Game was: Isn’t this the guy they don’t want to play?

The guy GM Sandy Alderson didn’t want to bring up, and manager Terry Collins doesn’t want to start, will be in Miami next week, hopefully for the first of many All-Star appearances. And, hopefully, when he rejoins the Mets, Collins will find a place for him in his outfield.

CONFORTO: Player Mets don't want to play is All-Star?

CONFORTO: Player Mets don’t want to play is All-Star?

Perhaps the Mets will clear a spot for him by trading Curtis Granderson or Jay Bruce, but what they do this week in Washington and St. Louis will determine whether they are buyers or sellers.

Yoenis Cespedes, foolishly re-signed by Alderson, has a no-trade clause in his four-year, $110-million contract so he isn’t going anywhere.

Conforto began the season coming off the bench, primarily as a pinch-hitter, but moved into the starting lineup when Cespedes was injured (his injury history, along with his salary and the Mets’ other needs are why I didn’t want him back).

Conforto started hitting the way he did at the end of the 2015 season and in April of 2016 before he tailed). At the time, Collins proclaimed him as the Mets’ No. 3 hitter of the future. He dropped off again this season, then sustained a bruise bone when he was struck by a pitch last week in San Francisco.

“I really didn’t think back to that,’’ Conforto told reporters of his role coming out of spring training. “Really, what I thought back to was the hard work that I’ve put in this offseason and in spring training. I always had a feeling that even if I didn’t start with the team, I knew I was going to make an impact at some point.’’

Conforto is hitting .285 with a .405 on-base percentage and .356 with 26 RBI with runners in scoring position.

“Obviously, last year was a learning experience for me and something I had to go through,’’ Conforto said. “I look at it as part of my journey. … You have to let it fuel your fire, which is definitely something it did for me.’’

 

Jun 23

Today’s Question: Have You Given Up On Mets?

If you’re a true fan, you’ll keep watching the Mets. Like an accident on the highway, you can’t take your eyes off of them. Jerry Blevins walking in runs was a new one for me, or perhaps I missed it earlier.

After they were bludgeoned in the first three games of their series in Los Angeles, last night was a tease. For a moment I thought they might salvage a game against the Dodgers, who hit 15 homers in the series. Ten games below .500 make any kind of playoff push nearly impossible.

REYES: Time to say good bye. (AP)

REYES: Time to say good bye. (AP)

It’s almost incomprehensible to imagine that considering the expectations of March.

GM Sandy Alderson has two choices. One, keep plodding away like an old plow horse and operate under the illusion they are playing for something. Or, they could actually be playing for something, which is next year.  Alderson already has a good idea of who will or won’t be back next year. Those he knows won’t be back, like Curtis Granderson – he’s finally hot, so whatever value he has left is at a premium now – and Asdrubal Cabrera, and Lucas Duda, and maybe Blevins and Addison Reed. Get what you can for them and let’s see what Amed Rosario and Dominic Smith and Brandon Nimmo can bring to the table.

Frankly, unless Rosario plays shortstop, I’m not interested in seeing Cabrera at second base. If anything, I’m tired of watching Jose Reyes and would rather see Wilmer Flores full time at second.

All experience is good, so give them the rest of the season. It won’t take away the disappointment of 2017, but perhaps it will take away the sour taste of this lost season.

 

 

Jun 21

Yup, Wheeler Is Fine … Except Goes On DL

What did I tell you about believing the injury denials from the Mets and their pitchers? Right, don’t believe a word they say. Less than 48 hours after saying there was nothing wrong with him, Mets starter Zack Wheeler was placed on the 10-day disabled list with biceps tendinitis.

WHEELER: Goes on DL. (AP)

WHEELER: Goes on DL. (AP)

“I’ve been feeling for a little while now and it has gotten a little worse,’’ Wheeler told reporters prior to Wednesday’s game against the Dodgers. “I could miss a start or two.’’

That’s not exactly the same thing as “I feel fine.’’

An MRI showed no structural damage and GM Sandy Alderson expects Wheeler to miss one start, but that’s being optimistic. Alderson speculates Wheeler might have hit a wall after missing the last two years following Tommy John surgery.

Wheeler’s next start will go to tonight’s starter, Tyler Pill, or Rafael Montero.

Wheeler, 27, is 3-5 with a 5.29 ERA after two straight horrendous starts in which he’s given up 15 runs while working 3.2 innings. He’s worked 66.1 innings, a little more than half of what his projected innings ceiling would be.

The Mets went to a six-man rotation, in part, to protect Wheeler. An innings limit shouldn’t be an issue any longer, but the six-man rotation could be gone without Wheeler and Matt Harvey.

“Neither the starting pitching nor the relief pitching is doing very well, and that’s been true over the last week or so with the exception of Jacob deGrom,’’ Alderson said. “We’re working hard to correct it. We haven’t seen any results at this point.’’

Just the last week or so?