Sep 06

If Dispute Not Resolved, Mets Should Explore Trading Harvey

It’s too late for the Mets to do what they should have done with Matt Harvey, but the timing might be right for them to do what they now should do.

Torched, and rightfully so, by the New York media for his comments that suggested only 14 innings were left in his season, Harvey, posted on Derek Jeter‘s website Sunday he would indeed pitch for the Mets should they reach the postseason.

HARVEY: Credibility in doubt. (MLB)

HARVEY: Credibility in doubt. (MLB)

“As an athlete, when your surgeon explains to you the risks of exceeding a certain number of innings, it can be alarming,” Harvey wrote. “You listen. I love to play baseball, and I love winning even more. I would not give that up for anything. I also know I want to be able to play and win for a long time.

“But there has never been a doubt in my mind: I will pitch in the playoffs. I will be healthy, active and ready to go. I am communicating with my agent, my doctor, [general manager] Sandy [Alderson] and the entire Mets organization. I can assure everyone that we’re all on the same page.”

We shall see.

I’d like to give Harvey the benefit of doubt, but his recent track record for believability isn’t strong.

Harvey’s next start is Tuesday – as he repeated ad nauseam Saturday – and if he and GM Sandy Alderson aren’t on the same page by the time he takes the mound, the Mets should take a hard line, aggressive stance with their diva. It should also be noted that if Harvey sides with Alderson, he would be going against agent Scott Boras and Dr. James Andrews.

I’m not sure Harvey is ready to take that stance.

If Harvey and the Mets don’t work things out and the innings limit remains at 180, Alderson should make it clear the pitcher will make his next start in five days and then tell him to disappear to remove the specter of his distraction.

Harvey’s comments Saturday regarding Boras made it clear his intent is to not leave a dollar on the table. At least, that’s his impression.

I never believed Harvey would re-sign with the Mets when he becomes a free agent in three years and still don’t. This flap might assure that scenario. So, if Harvey gets his 180 innings and is proclaimed healthy, considering he has a reasonable salary and the Mets’ starting depth, it might be time to explore the trade market.

Sep 05

Harvey Not Blameless In Mess

On a day Matt Harvey was in the process of possibly letting down his Mets teammates, they were picking up their diva pitcher. As Harvey let the Mets and their fans twist in the wind about the number of innings he’ll throw this season, the Mets and Bartolo Colon were rocking the Marlins Saturday night.

Harvey said the politically correct thing about concentrating on Tuesday’s start in Washington and added:  “As far as being out there, being with my teammates and playing, I’m never going to want to stop.”

HARVEY: Diva not blameless. (AP)

HARVEY: Diva not blameless. (AP)

However, the stop sign is set at 180 innings and Harvey has already thrown 166.1. Harvey reiterated agent Scott Boras’ comments from Friday his surgeon, Dr. James Andrews, had set a limit for him.

Presumably, Andrews set this limit entering the season, which would mean the Mets and Harvey knew all along. Given that, why wouldn’t the Mets come up with a defined plan and why would Harvey fight the Mets on the six-man rotation and push at times during the season to pitch when the prudent thing would have been to rest him?

However, that question suggests Andrews came up with this number recently. When asked numerous times this season, neither Harvey nor the Mets acknowledged the limit confirmed Saturday, with less than a month remaining in the season.

“I’m the type of person, I never want to put the ball down,” Harvey told reporters. “Obviously I hired Scott, my agent, and went with Dr. Andrews as my surgeon because I trusted them to keep my career going and keep me healthy. As far as the surgeon and my agent having my back and kind of looking out for the best of my career, they’re obviously speaking their mind about that.”

It must be noted the interests of Boras and Andrews don’t coincide with that of the Mets.

Meanwhile, the Mets are saying Harvey will make four more starts and work a “reasonable” number of postseason innings. However, they have not defined “reasonable.” Also, Harvey would not say if he would exceed 180 innings or would be around for the postseason.

However, in an incredible amount of hubris, Harvey said: “The biggest thing is getting us to where we need to be. I’m thrilled that we’re into this conversation because that means I’m healthy and pitching and had a lot of innings throughout the year.”

Harvey said he spoke with Andrews and his agent, but not whether he spoke with Mets GM Sandy Alderson. Reportedly, that will occur Monday in Washington.

“Dr. Andrews said his limit was 180,” Harvey said. “That’s what Scott, or Dr. Andrews had said. But, for me, I’ve got 166 innings. I don’t know any much more than what I have to do Tuesday. And that’s go out and beat the Nationals.”

How about winning the NL East? Or, how about pitching in the postseason? Harvey didn’t mention either of those things.

Harvey dodged all relevant questions. and instead threw out the same old cliches.

“Like I said, I’m going out Tuesday to try to beat the Nationals,” Harvey said. “That’s our focus right now. I’ve stayed out of it. … I’ve heard both sides. I’ve heard different sides all along. My job as an athlete and as a player and as part of this team is to concentrate on one start at a time.”

One start at a time? What nonsense. Stayed out of it? Please, even more nonsense.

He stayed out of it by squawking about innings and pitch counts? He stayed out of it by pushing to pitch when he was ill and should of rested? He stayed out of it by pushing to stay in games when he should have been pulled? He stayed out of it by complaining about the six-man rotation, which was designed to protect him?

When Andrews came up with 180 innings isn’t sure, but Harvey said it had been “awhile” that it had been reached. Whenever it was, Harvey shouldn’t have done anything this year that would conflict with efforts to conserve his innings, but he clearly did.

No question the Mets mishandled this by bowing down to their diva’s demands, but a major reason why your team could be without Harvey soon is because of the pitcher himself.

If Harvey were as smart and the team player he proclaims to be, the Mets wouldn’t be in this position. They also wouldn’t be in this mess if Alderson if he stood up to the temperamental Harvey.

However, in trying to keep a positive focus on things, if Harvey isn’t available for the postseason, that will leave him time to watch the Rangers’ preseason. I mean, that’s what’s important, right?

Aug 16

Barring Collapse, Collins Deserves Multi-Year Extension

It was typical ManagerSpeak by Terry Collins when he recently told reporter he wasn’t thinking about his contract status.

Really? It’s only natural to wonder just little. He wouldn’t be human if he didn’t. I don’t think Collins wants to go the Walter Alston route and sign 24 consecutive one-year contracts although the Mets would love that scenario.

COLLINS: What's he really thinking? (AP)

COLLINS: What’s he really thinking? (AP)

I’m telling you, I don’t think about it,’’ Collins said.

O.K, if you don’t, then allow me.

GM Sandy Alderson’s are to: 1) keep going year-to-year with Alderson, which is probably the Mets’ preference, but not to Collins’ liking, 2) cut Collins loose, which would be blatantly unfair, especially if the Mets make the playoffs, and 3) sign Collins to a multi-year extension, which is the fairest option of all, especially with a playoff appearance.

The last few years Collins was extended despite coming off losing seasons, but was given a pass because of injuries and management’s inability to acquire serious talent in the offseason. Other teams might not have given him that benefit of doubt and would have cut him loose.

Injuries have definitely affected the Mets this season – David Wright, Zack Wheeler and several relievers – and it wasn’t until recently that Alderson went into the trade market.

Should the Mets’ playoff ship be scuttled with September’s schedule – which isn’t brutally hard – then I can see Alderson getting a new manager.

But, starting over isn’t what this club needs. It requires consistency, and that’s keeping Collins and his staff. Being swept by the Pirates over the weekend at Citi Field should have no bearing on Collins stature. But, what it should do is serve as a reminder there are no givens. If nothing else, the Mets should be grateful the Nationals are in a horrific slide.

Should the Mets make the playoffs – and it doesn’t matter how – Collins should be rewarded with a multi-year extension. I’m thinking two years, or two plus an option.

Through injuries and a minimal influx of talent, Collins has the Mets playing exciting, competitive baseball. They will “play meaningful baseball in September.’’

That’s what we’ve always wanted and it looks as if it will happen. Collins is part of that and should be rewarded.

Aug 05

If They Want Him, Mets Must Act Quickly On Cespedes

Conventional wisdom says Yoenis Cespedes is a two-month rental for the Mets, with hopefully an October extension. Nobody expected GM Sandy Alderson to get him, much less keep him long-term.

However, Cespedes said he’d like to stay. Maybe it is gamesmanship on his part, but assuming he means it and he has the warm-and-fuzzies for the Mets, now is the time for the full-court press.

CESPEDES: It's now or never. (AP)

CESPEDES: It’s now or never. (AP)

If the Mets want him, Alderson must strike hard and fast. Signing Cespedes will give the Mets a jumpstart to their Christmas shopping.

“This is something I can’t control,’’ Cespedes told reporters Tuesday in Miami, conveniently overlooking the fact if he’s set on staying he can if they want him. “I don’t know what the front office is thinking about. But with what I see so far, I would love for everything to work out and stay as a Met for a long, long time, because I like the atmosphere.’’

Cespedes has a contract clause stating the Mets must release him before the free-agency period begins if they don’t want to sign him. This means is if he’s released after Aug. 31, he can’t re-sign with them until May 15, 2015. That means they sign him now or kiss him goodbye.

The Mets could fool around and say they want to re-sign him, but renege. They could do with him what they did with Jose Reyes.

That would tick off a lot of people.

Aug 01

Of The New Guys, Who Stays?

Unquestionably, the Mets are a better team today than a week ago. They added depth with Kelly Johnson and Juan Uribe; strengthened their bullpen with Tyler Clippard; and gave their offense a tremendous boost with Yoenis Cespedes.

Do they have enough now – remember, they can always add more in August with waiver deals – to overtake Washington? Yes, they are good enough to not only compete, but to win.

CESPEDES: Mets get slugger. (AP)

CESPEDES: Short stay in NY. (AP)

The NL East is theirs for the taking.

They are also better because they get to keep Zack Wheeler and Wilmer Flores. Regardless of whatever else Flores does in his Mets career, he permanently carved out a space in franchise lore.

Flores gave us a rare peak into the personal, emotional life of a professional athlete. He showed up these guys are human beings and capable of hurting with something other than a sprained ankle. Flores showed us frustration and anguish, and although you are young and rich, you can also feel the sting of rejection and embarrassment.

The whole country saw his tears Wednesday night before it fell through. Then, it saw him enjoy raw exhilaration with his game-winning homer Friday night?

Just wondering, but did his feet ever touch the ground? Yes, there are times when reality trumps fantasy.

So, I figure Flores will stay for a while, and be joined by Wheeler a year from now. But, what of the others? Let’s handicap the four acquisitions as to who they could keep next year?

CESPEDES: He’s the big prize, of course, at 29. But, he’s also going to want a monster contract. The Mets are his fourth team, which has to tell you something. If he turns out to be a good soldier with no incidents, then maybe, but I think the Mets will balk at his asking price, which would have to be a package of over $100 million. LEAVES

CLIPPARD: With Jenrry Mejia out and Jeurys Familia struggling in the second half it wouldn’t be surprising if he muscles into a closer role. He won’t be cheap, but he’s probably worth considering. STAYS

JOHNSON: I don’t know what will happen with Flores or David Wright, but Johnson is a reliable, versatile bench player. He’ll have some value, but don’t be surprised if they dumpster dive. LEAVES

URIBE: He’s already made a positive mark, but he’ll be 37 in March and I believe the Mets will seek younger options, including Dilson Herrera. LEAVES

 

The Mets picked quality this week and got to hold onto Flores and Wheeler. The latter contacted Alderson after the deal fell through and asked to be traded.

We’ll see next July, but for now the Mets have done well, and Flores continues to walk on air.