Jul 21

Today in Mets’ History: A tip of the hat to Beltran.

Thanks to Ray Sadecki for noting today might be Carlos Beltran’s last home game as a member of the Mets. Will they trade him before the trade deadline or extend this out until August? All indications are the Mets will move before July 31.

Ray asked for some reflections on the Beltran Era, and what sticks out most for me is him playing with a broken face after his outfield collision with Mike Cameron. Most outfielders would have packed it in, but Beltran kept on playing while others weren’t. Beltran played hurt, and he played hurt often. He is a gamer.

In 2006, he carried the Mets like the All-Star he was. I’ll never begrudge him for Adam Wainwright because it was a nasty pitch and who wouldn’t get caught on that?

From 2006-08, Beltran hit at least 27 homers with 112 RBI, but injuries sapped his production those two seasons. I’ll remember how the Mets rushed him back for a few more at-bats rather than undergo surgery immediately. It got to the point where Beltran had surgery on his own, causing him to be late for the 2010 season. That was on Omar Minaya.

I’ll always regard Beltran as a player capable of carrying a team on his back for a week or two, but not to the point where he’d shape a game like Mark McGwire or Barry Bonds. Then again, I’ll always remember Beltran as a clean player, one who was good to the game.

It’s a shame the Mets’ financial problems forced this position. If this had been handled better during the surgery issue and the Mets’ not caught with their pants down in the Ponzi scandal, then perhaps we’d be talking about an extension for him.

Beltran had a good career here when healthy. His career is over with the Mets, but there will an extension for him somewhere.

 

 

 

 

Jun 24

Analyzing a Reyes move.

General manager Brian Cashman said the Yankees would not make a run at Jose Reyes at the trade deadline.

“That’s just not going to happen … we have an everyday shortstop in Derek Jeter,’’ Cashman said.

REYES: What will happen?

Barring a significant injury to Jeter or Alex Rodriguez – which would require Jeter to move to third – there’s no need by the Yankees for Reyes. Because they placated to Jeter last winter, the Yankees probably cost themselves a dynamic replacement in Reyes, who could easily be a 20-plus homer player in Yankee Stadium.

That doesn’t mean Reyes won’t draw interest at the deadline or in the free-agent market this winter. Reyes all but guaranteed he would test the market when he said he wouldn’t negotiate during the season. It doesn’t mean he’s gone for good, but the Mets aren’t expected to approach the reported seven-year, $145-million he could command.

Just because the Yankees might not be players, it doesn’t mean Reyes would automatically slide back to the Mets. Boston has the need for a shortstop, plus the resources to pry Reyes away. The Washington Nationals also have a willingness to spend.

There are several wild-cards to consider that could impact where Reyes goes, such as the presence on the market of potential big-ticker players Albert Pujols, Prince Fielder, Mark Buehrle, Adam Wainwright and possibly CC Sabathia (he has an opt out clause).

There’s also the matter of how much the Mets’ financial situation might change by then, and the outcome of a new collective bargaining agreement (the current one expires in December).

Sep 29

Manuel reflects on a season lost

It was interesting to hear Jerry Manuel evaluate his performance last night on SNY, admitting he pushed the envelope in bringing back Jose Reyes and Carlos Beltran, and the experiment with Reyes at third.

MANUEL: The dreams of success have faded.

Much of the self-evaluation had been written by posters at the time, but it must be remembered Manuel is working off different information and conditions that we were.

Quite simply, Manuel knew there was pressure on him to win this year, and that only made it easier to be tempted, especially when the player says he’s ready.

Manuel didn’t get into it, but there was inconsistency in how he made out his lineup, set up his bullpen and bench. Lest we not forget, it was Manuel’s insistence to stay with Jenrry Mejeia, who has been shut down with a shoulder injury.

I also didn’t like how Manuel handled Jeff Francoeur and John Maine, but there are always be dust ups in the player-manager relationship.

Last night Manuel was candid, forthright and honest. There was very little excuse making, other than to say the collapse of the offense played a major factor into the season’s outcome. And. I don’t look at that as an excuse as much as a statement of fact.

If this had been Manuel’s first season with the Mets, you could make an argument for another chance, but he presided over the September collapse in 2008 and last year’s disaster. There were extenuating circumstances after both that warranted a second chance, the bottom line is that through a myriad of reasons, the Mets have taken a step back since 2006, and in this market, with this stadium and the expectations, somebody will have to pay the price for failure.

Keeping Manuel with roughly the same payroll as this season is to tell the fanbase “our hope is that we stay healthy and improve,’’ which is something they’ve been saying since Carlos Beltran took that third strike from Adam Wainwright.

Keeping Manuel would be saying this year was acceptable.

Jul 27

Mets Chat Room; Cardinals in town.

Game #100 vs. Cardinals

Things can always get worse. The question is: Will they ever get better? I mean, this year.

The weak-hitting Mets – who were shut out four time on their disastrous West Coast trip – open a three-game series tonight at Citi Field against St. Louis and Adam Wainwright, who is 4-0 with a 0.25 ERA over his last five starts and hasn’t allowed a run in 25 straight innings.

That’s whom the Mets will try to get better against.

The Mets went 2-9 on the trip, hit .196 and scored just 23 runs. One of the games they won was a gift from a bad umpire’s call.

“There’s no question that everybody’s frustrated,’’ said David Wright. “I think it adds to the frustration that our starters have been throwing the ball extremely well and our bullpen’s been solid. We just can’t get any runs for them. But now is not the time to hang your head or mope around.’’

Needing to pitch a shutout tonight – or at least it seems that way – will be Jonathon Niese, the beneficiary of all of four runs over his last three starts. He is 0-2 with a 3.20 ERA in that span.

The Mets return home with their coaching staff intact. There was speculation Howard Johnson would take the fall for the offense, but they decided that since their offense clicked in June that it would again.

Apr 19

April 19.10: About Last Night: Maine will get another start.

GM Omar Minaya said he’d take one out of three in St. Louis. He got it, but is anybody really happy? They could have won all three with a little bit of hitting. Then again, they could have been swept, too.

John Maine was better last night, but the qualifier is he was better in comparison to his previous two rotten starts. Adam Wainwright pitched a complete game last night with 107 pitches. Maine was lucky to get through five with the 115 he threw.

Maine worked out of trouble in each of the first four innings, which showed some improvement, but gave up a three-run homer to Colby Rasmus in the fifth. How often does a manager pull a pitcher winning 3-0 after four scoreless innings?

If he had to do it all over again, that might have been the way for Jerry Manuel to go last night.

While Maine on a whole was a disappointment again, he showed enough to where he’ll get the ball again. He threw his fastball more, and the more he throws it the harder it will become. He’s still throwing it in the low 90s with little movement. It should get better.

The one thing the Mets have to take out of their 2-4 road trip to Colorado and St. Louis was a definite improvement in the rotation collectively. What they got received from their five they’ll take every time.

Of course, they’ll still come away 2-4 at best because they offense is non-existent, especially with runners in scoring position, hitting .155 on the trip.

Moving Jose Reyes to the three hole isn’t the answer, because he’s not getting on base anyway. Nobody is hitting, including now Jeff Francoeur, whose 10-game hitting streak has fallen into an 0-for-9 slide.

Jason Bay? Well, he’s still on the team, but you’d never know it by his production.

“I’m living what they are watching,” Bay said in St. Louis last night. “It’s just one of those things you go through… I’m just going through a slump.”

Although Bay struck out four times Saturday, he did scorch a line drive that was robbed of a hit late in the game. Given he finally made contact, I thought he would have played last night.

A lot of pressure will be put on Ike Davis when he arrives, presumably tomorrow, as he was in the starting line-up today in Buffalo.

I’m encouraged by the pitching on the trip, but also tempered because it is one time through the rotation. We’ll see what we get from Jon Niese tonight against the Cubs.