Mar 15

Mets Have Reason To Be Concerned With Cespedes’ Wrist

The question isn’t whether Yoenis Cespedes should hit second, third or fourth in the Mets’ Opening Day lineup. The question is will he even be in the lineup?

Cespedes was supposed to be healthy this season and yoga was going to be the reason. Is yoga the reason Cespedes has a wrist injury that necessitated a cortisone inject earlier this week?

CESPEDES: Wrist concerning. (AP)

CESPEDES: Wrist concerning. (AP)

Could be as there are a lot of yoga positions where strain is applied to the wrist.

Cespedes played in only 81 games last year with several leg injuries. His legs appear to be all right, but a wrist injury for a slugger is concerning.

How long will Cespedes is out? With Opening Day two weeks away, and the Mets’ offense sputtering, there’s reason for them to be worried. How long will Cespedes be out?

“A couple days at the least, probably,’’ manager Mickey Callaway told reporters yesterday. “We’ll see how he feels after a couple of days and go from there. Not very concerned because he’s had it before and said he’s battled through it and was fine, hopefully, it was the same thing he was feeling a couple of years ago.’’

Cortisone injections can be tricky. If the needle hits the right spot, Cespedes could be out of trouble for several months. If the needle misses, then it could be a long season.

We should know by early next week.

Mar 13

Callaway Makes Smart Opening Day Call

Based on last year’s performance, Jacob deGrom deserves to be the Opening Day starter, but it’s a credit to manager Mickey Callaway handle on things that the start goes to Noah Syndergaard.

Despite deGrom throwing in the high 90s Sunday in his first exhibition start after a two-week delay with back stiffness, Callaway saw no reason to play charades and push him. What’s the purpose, especially when Syndergaard is healthy and throwing in the 100s?

All too often the Mets pushed pitchers to be ready for the start of the season – you only have to think back to Matt Harvey last year – with disastrous results.

DeGrom will start the season’s second game against St. Louis.

“We think that’s a pretty good one and two coming out of the gate,’’ Callaway said. “We were trying to do everything we can because he earned it based on last year. It just didn’t make sense to us to try and push it, and to get him ready for Opening Day.’’

Harvey and Jason Vargas will take the next two spots in the rotation with Steven Matz, Zack Wheeler, Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman competing for the final slot.

Mar 08

Mets’ Top Five Questions As Opening Day Looms

Opening Day is three weeks from today and there’s more than a foot of snow outside my door. The Mets lost today and now are 5-9 this spring. Today the Nationals lit up Jeurys Familia for five runs.

Results and stats don’t matter in spring training. It’s about getting ready for the season and right now Mickey Callaway’s team isn’t ready. Far from it.

Callaway and GM Sandy Alderson have a boatload of questions that must be addressed before the Cardinals get to town.

The following are the top five:

  1. What is the rotation?

A: There are four givens – Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, Matt Harvey and Jason Vargas – with Steven Matz, Zack Wheeler, Robert Gsellman and Seth Lugo competing for the fifth spot.

  1. What is the make-up of the front end of the bullpen?

A: Familia, AJ Ramos, Anthony Swarzak and Jerry Blevins are the givens at the back end.  If Gsellman and Lugo don’t start, one of them could end up in the pen. So might Rafael Montero, who is out of options. Jamie Callahan, Paul Sewald, Jacob Rhame and Hansel Robles will compete for the final spot or two.

  1. Who is the leadoff hitter?

A: Brandon Nimmo is the best bet because of his on-base percentage. But, will the Mets commit to him in center field until Michael Conforto returns or will they go with a platoon of Nimmo and Juan Lagares until then? Amed Rosario has the speed, but a poor on-base percentage. It could end up being Asdrubal Cabrera, who has a passable on-base percentage and can add some pop.

  1. Is there a healthy first baseman?

A: Adrian Gonzalez has a bad back and Dominic Smith has a bum leg. Other than me, nobody ever mentions Wilmer Flores, who is destined never to get a fair shake with the Mets.

  1. How healthy is Yoenis Cespedes?

A: He played only 81 games last year with a quad injury and is having a slow spring. If the Mets are to be competitive, they need a big year from Cespedes.

 

Mar 06

Is It Time To Worry About Rosario’s Knee?

The Mets have been upfront about their injury situation. Unfortunately, there’s a lot for them to talk about. The latest of consequence is shortstop Amed Rosario’s sore left knee.

Rosario didn’t return today against Houston, and still hasn’t undergone an MRI since leaving Saturday’s game. The Mets are calling it “left knee irritation,’’ but Rosario said: “I felt some sort of tightness about the knee. That’s what I felt. … On Saturday I felt a little bit of pain.’’ (Monday) I tried to run a little bit again, but not on the same level as Saturday, so it’s going down.’’

Opening Day is three weeks from tomorrow, and Rosario said he’s now “starting from zero.’’

The Mets have Jose Reyes to fall back on [although Ty Kelly started today].

Is it time to worry about making the Opening Day roster? If this continues to linger and doctors find something today, maybe it is.

The Mets finally gave Rosario an MRI today which came back negative.

 

 

Mar 05

So Far, So Good For Harvey

It’s not important Matt Harvey is no longer considered to be the Mets’ ace. What is important is for him to just be part of the rotation. As of now, with Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler hurting and struggling, Harvey figures to slot in as third in the rotation.

HARVEY: Looking good. (AP)

HARVEY: Looking good. (AP)

He’s been solid in his two starts, and if he continues to pitch as well in his remaining four exhibition starts as he did in his three shutout innings in today’s 4-2 victory over Detroit, he could conceivably start the season’s second game if Jacob deGrom isn’t ready.

Harvey was throwing free and easy, and topping out in the mid-90s, something he rarely did last spring.

“You don’t want to be a weak link in such a powerful rotation,’’ Harvey told reporters today. “That’s what keeps us going, and pushing each other so hard. It’s nice to finally be part of that.’’

Harvey struck out two, walked one and gave up one in 48 pitches. Ideally, you’d like for him to throw fewer over three innings, we have to remember he’s still trying to return from thoracic outlet syndrome and arterial surgery.

Harvey might never hit 100 again, but he threw hard enough today to win, and if his changeup and slider register in the upper-80s as they did today, he could be very successful.

Most importantly for Harvey is how he’s implemented manager Mickey Callaway’s suggestion to speed up his delivery.

“This is a completely new year, like I’ve said,’’ Harvey said. “My mechanics are completely different. My arm’s completely different.’’

Let’s hope the results are.