Oct 02

How About Collins Overseeing Mets’ Minor League System?

GM Sandy Alderson said Terry Collins is best suited to work in player development. If that is the case, and Alderson is telling the truth that he believes Collins has a lot to offer and he wants to continue working with him, then there is one role for him, and that is to oversee the minor league system with the goal of implementing a “Mets Way.’’

Both Alderson and Collins suggested a need for such a program in recent weeks. Collins did in a roundabout way several weeks ago when commenting about Amed Rosario’s habit of tapping his glove with the ball before throwing to first. That habit cost the Mets a game and Collins wondered why it wasn’t addressed in Las Vegas.

Alderson more conceded the need for such an instructor when he noted several of the Mets’ rookies came to New York with a multitude of bad habits.

Rosario’s habit and Dominic Smith’s brain cramps are just two of the most prevalent. There are others, beginning with pitchers’ inability to throw strikes, and including hitters’ plate discipline, atrocious base running and defensive fundamentals, such as hitting the cutoff man.

Situational hitting and improving on-base percentage also must be improved.

The idea is to teach, beginning with the rookie leagues the same things are expected from the major leaguers.

That way there are no surprises.

However, for this to work Alderson must first implement organizational philosophies on offense and pitching. The pitchers have to be taught to throw inside, the way Rafael Montero was when he was on his hot streak.

Too many of the Mets’ hitters are preoccupied with hitting home runs. Sure, home runs are great, but consider this, the Mets tied Milwaukee for the NL lead with 224 homers, but neither are in the playoffs.

Oct 01

Collins’ Era Over, But Not Career With Mets

A season that began with high expectations, mercifully ended today for the Mets with an 11-0 rout by the Phillies, and with it the anticipated announcement of manager Terry Collins future.

With both Collins and GM Sandy Alderson saying the time was right for a change, the longest-tenured manager in franchise history at seven years announced he was “stepping down’’ to take an undefined role in the organization concentrating on player development and working with the managers in the minor league system.

COLLINS: Still with Mets (AP)

COLLINS: Still with Mets (AP)

As the Mets played out the string to finish a dismal 70-92, speculation of Collins’ future raged and boiled over in a vicious Newsday article that featured numerous anonymous quotes ripping the manager.

Through it all, Collins insisted he wouldn’t resign and wanted to stay in baseball. There was a tremendous negative backlash against Alderson and Mets’ ownership that makes me wonder what the Mets’ true motivation is in this decision.

Collins spoke with owner Fred Wilpon and COO Jeff Wilpon prior to the game and it is then that it is believed the advisory role in the front office was offered.

“I don’t know if I had it in me right now,’’ Collins said, fighting back tears when asked if he would have accepted an offer to continue managing the Mets.

“But right now, I am going to get some rest and figure out how to help out down the road. … It’s been a blast, but it’s time. This is one of those years you want to forget. There’s a sour taste, but it’s in the best interest of the organization and I’ve always been a team player.’’

In this case, being a team player prevented the ugly scenario of Alderson having to fire Collins. You could tell what happened today was orchestrated, and if not offered a position Collins would have forced ownership to fire him.

So instead of falling on the sword to protect the emperor, Collins looked after himself. He wants to stay in baseball and he’s going to do that with the Mets in a teaching capacity. It’s not managing, but he’s still in the game.

It’s not what he wants, but it’s what he needs.

Speaking in his finest legalese, Alderson said: “From our standpoint, I think we are at the end of a seven-year run and we need to make a change in direction. That’s often a code phrase for changing positions and jobs and that I think is what we foresee here.”

Alderson said he’ll begin the interview process immediately from the pool of Robin Ventura, Kevin Long, Joe McEwing, Alex Cora, Bob Geren and Chip Hale.

But first, he’ll purge Collins’ staff, beginning with pitching coach Dan Warthen.

“That’s the unavoidable fallout from a change in manager is that coaching positions become question marks,’’ Alderson said. “Then we will start in earnest over the next few days [interviewing managerial candidates]. We certainly don’t want to waste any time.’’

That’s because Alderson has a lot of work to do beginning with the pitching staff decimated by injuries. Without those injuries, and those to David Wright, Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes, there could have been the playoffs for the third straight season and Collins might have been given an extension and a chance to improve on his 551-583 record with the Mets.

“It’s baseball,’’ Collins said. “I have spent my whole life in it, and there’s good days, bad days, good weeks, bad weeks, good years and bad years. You have got to be able to deal with them all. You can’t just ride the wave all the time, so we’ll move on.”

Sep 30

Alderson Unhappy About Anonymous Quotes

Sandy Alderson said he was upset with the published report that cited numerous anonymous critical comments of manager Terry Collins. Alderson said the Newsday article was unfair and did not reflect his feelings about Collins.

Alderson said he would find the source of quotes from the front office and fire him.

ALDERSON: Disappointed with nameless quotes. (AP)

ALDERSON: Disappointed with nameless quotes. (AP)

“If I knew who it was, they would be terminated,’’ Alderson said prior to today’s game in Philadelphia.

What Alderson didn’t do was apologize to Collins or refute the comments that claimed the manager ignored front office directives from the front office on managing the bullpen. He also wouldn’t comment on Collins’ future.

Alderson said the article overshadowed Collins’ seven-year managerial tenure and the Mets’ success under Collins “speaks for itself.’’

It also speaks for itself that if Alderson was that perturbed he would have said something yesterday when the article came out.

The Mets’ ownership, Alderson and the players quoted took considerable heat, with David Wright calling the anonymous quotes “cowardly.’’

Alderson said any relationship will have highs and lows, but wouldn’t say where he fell short. Regarding reports Collins’ job last year was saved by owner Fred Wilpon, Alderson said he has a good relationship with the owner.

The Mets’ list of potential replacements includes Robin Ventura, Alex Cora, Joe McEwing, Kevin Long, Bob Geren and Chip Hale. That’s six candidates, and if you have that many you really have none.

 

Sep 29

Gutless Players, Team Executives Lash Out At Collins

David Wright nailed it when he called the anonymous quotes from his teammates “cowardly,’’ but even more disturbing were the nameless comments from the front office, or to be more precise, GM Sandy Alderson’s lieutenants. Hell, they could even be from Alderson himself.

It’s just a gutless way of doing things, but considering the failed regimes of Bobby Valentine, Art Howe, Willie Randolph and Jerry Manuel, is anybody really surprised?

Hardly.

Players will always hide behind anonymous quotes, but you have to wonder what the motivation is for an executive whose job is safe. Unless it is to pile on before the inevitable on Monday in support of Alderson’s agenda, what is the point?

“Terry has no allies in the front office,’’ one official told Newsday. For another executive to say owner Fred Wilpon is too chummy with Collins paints an organization that is totally dysfunctional, much the way it was when Tony Bernazard was a mole in the clubhouse to spy on Randolph.

Wright is spot on about all those nameless, faceless quotes, they were cowardly and gutless, both from the players and especially from the front office.

Is Collins perfect? No. Were all his decisions the right ones? Hell no. Could Collins have done things differently? Of course. But, all those answers could be applied to every manager in history.

If Collins has no allies, it must be remembered the front office broke the alliance first with Alderson the main provocateur.

I also have a problem with Fred Wilpon in all of this. Wilpon said he doesn’t interfere. Who is he, Switzerland? It is his team, who just two years ago was in the World Series.

Wilpon owns the Mets, and it is his responsibility to do the right thing for his ballclub and the fan base that has supported him. And, the shabby treatment of Collins is his doing because he won’t do the right thing. Total dysfunction is the Mets.

 

Sep 28

Bravo For Collins Not Quitting

Several days ago I wrote Terry Collins shouldn’t make things easier for owner Fred Wilpon and GM Sandy Alderson, and if the Mets wanted him out they should be put in the awkward position of having to defend the decision to fire the longest-tenured and second-winningest manager in franchise history.

COLLINS: Treated shamefully. (AP)

COLLINS: Treated shamefully. (AP)

Yesterday, prior to the last game of the season at Citi Field, Collins did the right thing and said he has no intention of resigning.

“I said it a couple years ago, I didn’t know how long I wanted to manage, what could be my last year – I never said anything that I was going to retire,’’ Collins told reporters. “I always wanted to work until I was 70. That’s two more years … I can put something to rest: I’m not going to go home and go fishing. OK. Whatever anybody thinks about if I’m going to be here or not, I can’t answer that. But I’m going to be doing something.

“I’m going to be somewhere. If after we have discussions, if it feels I shouldn’t be here, then I won’t be. … We’ve created something here that’s pretty good. That’s my take. I haven’t talked to anybody about it so we’ll go from there.’’

Reportedly, the Mets are considering six candidates to replace Collins, but none with his resume.

There are also published reports pitching coach Dan Warthen is also on the way out. Of the five young arms that were to make up the core of the rotation, only Jacob deGrom hasn’t missed a start this season. Noah Syndergaard and Matt Harvey spent considerable time on the disabled list, and Alderson must accept responsibility by rushing Harvey on the Opening Day roster two months before he was ready and by letting Syndergaard pitch without the MRI.

None of the five, which includes Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz, have made a complete cycle through the rotation. Speaking of which 12 different pitchers started for the Mets this season, and that is more than partial explanation for the high number of walks.

Syndergaard and Alderson, and not Warthen or Collins, bear responsibility for bulking up last offseason. When Alderson took over prior to the 2011 season, he and Jeff Wilpon promised every aspect of the Mets’ training and medical staff would be evaluated.

That also applies to Yoenis Cespedes’ bulking up regime last winter. One would think a general manager to issues a $110-million contract to a player with an injury history would oversee the offseason conditioning program.

I have had issues with how Collins juggles his bullpen and batting order (149 different orders), but shouldn’t Alderson assume the lion’s share of the responsibility because he built this team then stripped it down of his veteran talent?

Collins has been undercut by Alderson at every turn. He said he wants to continue and believes he’s earned a considerable amount of respect throughout baseball.

Too bad he’s not getting any from his own team.