Dec 07

Reyes addresses New York media.

Jose Reyes spoke with members of the Mets’ media this afternoon at the Winter Meetings in Dallas. Here’s a transcript of what he said:

On whether he was surprised that Mets were not more aggressive:

“During the season, you guys know, I always say I want to go back to play there. But they don’t do anything to want me there. So, after that, there’s nothing really I can do. Now, I’m with the Miami Marlins. The Mets don’t do anything to have me. It is what it is, man. This is a business and I have to move on. It’s over. I can’t be crying about that, because they don’t show me anything. They don’t push anything to have me there. Why should I be worried about it if they didn’t want me?”

Do you think they just didn’t want you? Or was it probably their financial situation and not being to afford you?

“You know, I can’t tell you that, because they never talked to me. I don’t know if it was because of the money or they don’t want me there — they want to move on with some other pieces. I don’t know, because they never said anything. Sandy maybe talked with Peter, but they don’t offer anything. They don’t do like real offer. They don’t do anything, really.”

Would you have wanted them to call you more this offseason, show you more love?

“No doubt. They don’t do that. When we almost get close to making a deal with the Marlins, that’s when they called. But they call for nothing because they don’t offer anything. It’s kind of weird. I was confused a little bit. During the season a lot of times Sandy (Alderson) said, ‘We want Jose’ and stuff like that. I expect they’d at least call and say, ‘We’re still working on some things so we’re going to get to you guys.’ That never happened.”

Do you feel badly leaving David Wright behind in what may be a difficult situation to win?

“I don’t want to say I feel bad. They still have some good talent there on the team. I wish all the best to David. I think if he’s healthy this year he’s going to do what he did in the past. I don’t worry about David because he’s a guy who is working hard a lot. I know I’m going to miss him, because I play all my career with him beside me. But it was time for me to move on.”

The hair was to be cut?

“That’s the rule that they have.”

What about making only one postseason appearance with the Mets?

“It is disappointing because you play this game to win. A couple of times we had very good teams over the years and we weren’t able to do anything. I feel sorry from that part because we weren’t able to bring a championship to Queens.”

If the money was similar, would you have picked Mets?

“That’s too late to think about that.”

Are you still going to hear those “Jose, Jose” chants at Citi Field?

“I don’t know, to be honest with you. I don’t know. But, like I say, I show a lot of love to the fans. They show a lot of love to me too and they support me. They know that I’m going to play for another team. So I don’t know how their reaction is going to be. But I’m going to still love them. Whatever it is it is. But I’m going to play for another team now.”

Was it hard to walk away from only team you ever knew?

“I don’t want to say easy, but I’m on another team now. I’m past that place. … It’s never easy, because like I said, I spent all my life playing in New York. So it’s not an easy decision. But what can I do? They didn’t show anything. And Miami, they were there from the beginning for me. With the good plan that they have, I have to make my decision there.”

Several observations on what Reyes had to say:

1) Reyes made it clear he didn’t want to negotiate during the season, but he’s making it sound as if the Mets did nothing. They simply respected his request.

2) He’s right. There’s no reason he should worry about things if the Mets didn’t make a formal offer. Reyes, however, did understand the parameters the Mets were operating from. To say he was oblivious to what the Mets would offer is not accurate.

3) It was uneasy to hear him say, “I show a lot of love to the fans.” Isn’t this is the same guy who pulled himself from the game in the season finale to sit on his batting average? Not much love there.

4) “I’m past that place.” Kind of says it all, doesn’t it?

5) “This is a business and I have to move on.” Truer words were never spoken.

By the way, great line by Sandy Alderson when asked if he should have shown more love to Reyes, said: “If you’re asking me if I should have sent him a box of chocolates, perhaps I should have done that.”

 

Dec 07

On trading David Wright.

I wrote it also, losing Jose Reyes could make it easier for the Mets to eventually trade David Wright if they go in full rebuilding mode. However, it is not imminent and regardless of what you read, it won’t be to the Yankees.

WRIGHT: He's not going anywhere.

Despite his power dropoff in two of the past three seasons, Wright is the only marketable player the Mets have remaining. Ike Davis and Lucas Duda are a promise. Nobody else generates more than a yawn.

Wright will not be dealt while the Mets are trying to sell season tickets and advertising for SNY and Citi Field.  And based on his production in two of the past three years, his value is at its lowest. If the Mets are bent on trading Wright, they’ll need to see him healthy and hitting for power. That’s what will get Sandy Alderson’s phone ringing. Dealing Wright now would be trading him when the market is low.

Just not a smart thing to do.

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Dec 07

Are the Mets any better?

I’ve been scanning some of the other blogs and was surprised some believe the Mets are better now than they were at the end of the season.

How?

Make no mistake, I always thought Jose Reyes would leave, but until they add quality from their savings, I just don’t see where you can make the argument the team is better without him.

They’ve lost the NL batting champion and replaced him with Ruben Tejada. I like Tejada’s potential, but it isn’t proven production. So, there is a downgrade at shortstop.

Gone from the rotation is Chris Capuano, replaced by …. you tell me. I’m not buying into Johan Santana until I see him pitch regularly.

Angel Pagan and Andres Torres are essentially the same player. Torres is better defensively, and the improvement is in shedding Pagan’s sometimes lackadaisical attitude. That’s not saying the Mets won this trade.

The Mets added two pitchers to their bullpen with strikeout capabilities, but you have to ask yourself if they were so good why would they have been available? I’m seeing it as exchanging one set of mediocre arms for another.

The Mets still have questions in their rotation, bullpen, first base, catcher, second base, left field and right field.

Other than shedding payroll for the promise of doing something later, I don’t see where they’ve gotten any better.

 

ON DECK (Today): The market for David Wright.

 

Dec 07

Ramirez supposedly not happy; Mets deal Pagan.

Word out of the Winter Meetings has Hanley Ramirez upset about being asked to move to third base. Initial reports had Ramirez saying he’d be happy to move if it meant adding his buddy Jose Reyes.

RAMIREZ: Not a happy camper?

To hear Ramirez is unhappy is ridiculous, but hardly surprising considering how some teams communicate. This should have been resolved a long time ago, similar to when the Yankees traded for Alex Rodriguez, who knew he wouldn’t move Derek Jeter out of shortstop.

Ramirez is an immensely talented player, but also has pronounced streaks of petulance and moodiness, and can be a dog if he doesn’t get his way. This is not something a team on the rise needs. If these reports are true, the Marlins made a mistake, unless, of course they plan to deal Ramirez for pitching.

But, that’s Miami’s problem.

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Dec 06

If spring training were to start tomorrow ….

If spring training were to begin spring training tomorrow, the Mets would not bring to Florida that would be worthy of optimism, not with Philadelphia, Atlanta, Miami and Washington all getting better and willing to make the moves the Mets can’t afford in their present economic climate.

When asked what he would say to Mets’ fans to sell them on 2012, GM Sandy Alderson said his sales pitch would be focusing on the future, and if the team was healthy and played to its expectations they could be competitive.

We’ve heard that refrain before and we’ll hear it again,

But for now, assuming no additions to the roster, let’s see what the Mets will bring to Port St. Luice:

STARTING ROTATION

JOHAN SANTANA: Alderson said the other day he expects Santana back in the rotation. Would be nice for him go through a spring training first. There’s no guarantee when Santana will return, and if he does, how effective he’ll be. They can’t be thinking they’ll plug in a Cy Young Award winner.

MIKE PELFREY: The de facto ace last summer after a strong 2010 and Santana’s injury. He’ll get his raise for winning all of seven games. This just might be Pelfrey’s make-or-break season. If the Mets could land another starter, and they’ll need it after losing Chris Capuano to Los Angeles, I wouldn’t be adverse to trying Pelfrey as a closer. Something has to be done to shake up this guy.

RA DICKEY: After a rocky start, Dickey closed strong despite pitching injured. The fluke label should be removed because Dickey has been the Mets’ most consistent starter the past two years. Even so, he’s still a back end of the rotation guy.

DILLON GEE: Like Dickey in 2010, Gee came out of nowhere to become a viable member of the rotation. Gee sprinted out of the gate, but hitters eventually figured him out. However, on the plus side, Gee did his own adjusting. Gee passed through the organization without a lot of flash. Yes, we have to look at his first year with caution, but there’s also reason to be optimistic.

JON NIESE: Niese is another who is an injury question. When he’s been on he’s been nearly untouchable. He’s also had moments when he loses the strike zone. One of the Mets’ best decisions was not to include Niese in the Santana trade. It may turn out he’ll replace him in the rotation.

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