Jun 22

Poll: What should the Mets do with Carlos Beltran?

I’ve added a poll on what the Mets should do with Carlos Beltran. Your votes and comments would be greatly appreciated.

Should they:

1. Keep him and make a long-shot run at the postseason, even if it means not receiving any draft picks when he inevitably signs elsewhere as a free agent?

2. Trade him for whatever they can get and save some salary, even if that’s a white flag on the season?

3. And, the long shot of the all, re-sign him to an extension now. Figuring his agent is Scott Boras, he’ll probably ask for three years.

Thanks.

 

 

 

Jun 22

Today in Mets’ History: Franco climbs save list.

John Franco has always been one of the more popular Mets. You can catch him on SNY from time to time.

FRANCO: Hall worthy?

On this date in 1994, Franco passed Dave Righetti for the most saves by a lefthander with 253 in a 5-2 victory at Atlanta.

Franco finished with 424 saves, an average of 26 per season playing for the Reds, Mets an Astros. He had eight seasons of 30 or more saves – five of them with the Mets – with a career best 39 with Cincinnati in 1988.

That season was one of three times in which he led the National League in saves.

Franco is fourth on the career list behind Trevor Hoffman, Mariano Rivera and Lee Smith, but has received little consideration for the Hall of Fame, largely because he has one save in 15 postseason appearances.

Franco has always been a straight shooter, which accounts for much of his popularity among Mets fans.

During the summer of 2009 when the Mets were hit hard by injuries and struggling, Franco wanted to hear none of the excuses and pointed in a different direction.

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Jun 21

Examining potential Beltran trade.

BELTRAN: Trade deadline approaching.

The question doesn’t appear to be “if,’’ but “when,’’ the Mets will deal outfielder Carlos Beltran.

The physical questions that followed him into the season have seemingly been answered in the positive, which means the Mets don’t have to think solely about dealing with the American League, although there are several interesting possibilities, including Boston, Chicago and Detroit.

The Red Sox could have inside leverage because executive Allard Baird – who interviewed for the Mets’ GM job – was the general manager at Kansas City when Beltran played there. That could help in Beltran waiving his no-trade clause.

In the National League, San Francisco needs offense, as does St. Louis with Albert Pujols injured and out from four to six weeks. Lance Berkman could move to first base to replace Pujols and make room for Beltran in right field.

To move Beltran, the Mets figure to eat a portion of his $18.5 million contract. How much they digest could make it substantially easier to move him. Unless they decide to make a serious run at a wild card – which would have to mean adding players instead of subtracting them – it does the Mets no good to keep Beltran because they would not receive compensatory draft picks as he is not arbitration eligible.

As badly as the Mets want to save salary and add prospects, don’t look for a crosstown move to the Yankees for two reasons, 1) the Yankees’ priority is pitching, and 2) there should be no inclination on the Mets’ part to aid the Yankees.

Should GM Sandy Alderson trade him to the Yankees, it would clearly indicate he doesn’t have a grasp on the lay of the land in New York. The Mets are struggling, both on the field and financially, and the last thing they need is to trade a key player that could put the Yankees over the top.

A trading of Beltran would raise a white flag of sorts, but don’t trade him to a prime antagonist.


 

Jun 21

Today in Mets’ History: Jim Bunning was perfect.

This date wasn’t one of the Mets’ most shining moments in their history, but it was memorable nonetheless when Philadelphia’s Jim Bunning tossed a perfect game at Shea Stadium on Father’s Day, 1964, winning 6-0.

BUNNING: Perfecto vs. Mets in 1964

Tracy Stallard, the pitcher who served up Roger Maris’ 61st homer three years earlier, was the losing pitcher for the Mets.

Pinch-hitter John Stephenson struck out to end the game. It was Bunning’s 10th strikeout.

BOX SCORE

Lost on that day was in the second game of the doubleheader, Rick Wise beat the Mets on a three-hitter, 8-2.

Bunning, a Hall of Famer and nine-time All-Star, also pitched for Detroit, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles.

Bunning also threw a no-hitter for Detroit, July 20, 1958, over Boston. When he retired after the 1971 season following a second stint with the Phillies, he had 2,855 strikeouts, second on the career list at the time behind Walter Johnson.

Bunning is also the answer to a trivia question, as he was the only pitcher to strike out Ted Williams three times in a single game.

After has retirement, Bunning served as a state senator for Kentucky.

If anybody has any memories of that day, please share them.

 


 

Jun 20

Santana resumes throwing; return not soon.

Johan Santana resumed his throwing program and told ESPN Radio he believes it is possible to return in late July.

SANTANA: Throwing again.

That falls under the I’ll-believe-it-when-I-see-it category. Athletes are always putting a positive spin on the return dates of their injuries, and Santana is no exception.

The most hysterical thing I’ve heard lately was on a call-in radio show when the topic was who Santana would replace in the rotation.

There’s no way of telling when Santana would return as evidenced by his setback in June when he complained of soreness in his shoulder. Santana underwent surgery last September to fix a torn capsule in his left shoulder.

The protocol in these things is to throw off the mound to build up this arm strength and work on all his pitches.  From there, it will be throwing to live hitters in batting practice, until graduating to rehab games.

It takes a pitcher a six-week spring training to be ready for the season and that puts us into early August. As of now, Santana isn’t even at the first day of spring training.