Jun 27

Today in Mets’ History: Anthony Young loses again.

YOUNG: The losing never seemed to stop.

Futility is often a word linked to the Mets, and who dealt with it more than Anthony Young who lost 27 consecutive decisions, including No. 24 on this date in 1993, losing 5-3 to St. Louis.

From April 14, 1992 while with the Mets, until May 1, 1994, then with the Chicago Cubs, Young lost 27 straight decisions.

That stretch including 13 quality starts, defined as giving up three runs in at least six innings.

Young finished retired in 1996, last pitching for Houston, with a 15-48 record, but a decent 3.89 ERA.

Do you remember Young and that stretch? If so, please post your thoughts.

YOUNG’S CAREER

 

 

Jun 27

Mets Take Series With 8-5 Win Over Rangers

Dillon Gee pitched around some early inning trouble, and the offense put up enough runs to put the game out of reach as the Mets won the game, 8-5 and the series versus the Rangers

Game Notes

Dillon Gee was effective, if not spectacular in his six innings of work today. He allowed three runs on eight hits, walking two and striking out one while allowing one HR. Gee looked to be doomed in the first inning, giving up numerous hits. He settled down and looked very good in the later innings for the most part. He hasn’t shown that good control recently, and thus has been getting hit because he cannot locate.

Four of the bullpen boys came out today. Beato went an clean inning, Byrdak a clean two-thirds, Izzy a clean one-third and K-Rod came out in a game that was five runs ahead and managed to make it only a three run win. K-Rod has consistently looked…bad. It isn’t a matter of pitching himself in and out of trouble now. He is walking batters, giving up extra base hits and being forced into situations. His ineptitude to “close” also hurts some of his trade value.

The offense today existed thanks to major Ranger errors. The first run scored on a wild pitch, the second on an error and the fourth and fifth on a failed “intentional walk”. Its good to see the Mets winning with some timely hitting and aggressive baserunning, but at what point will the lack of any power create problems?

Jason Bay – 0 for 5 with an RBI and a strikeout. 51 K’s in 187 AB’s. Eek.

Daniel Murphy – 3 for 4 with two runs and an RBI. Also, caught stealing. Great to see Daniel put up some hits.

Ronny Paulino – 2 for 4 with two runs. He may not be hitting the lefties for power right now, but he is hitting them. Much more then can be said about..

Scott Hairston – 1 for 5 with a strikeout. Hairston only hit wasn’t hit very hard. How much longer is he the acceptable fifth OF?

Turning Point

Mets second inning after Gee gave up two runs. It just gave Dillon confidence to know he wasn’t going to have to win the game, he just couldn’t give it away.

Game Ball

Jose Reyes – 4 for 5 with three runs, an RBI and an SB. Honestly, he slumps for three games and does this. If thats how long he will slump for, opponents will begin walking Jose.

On Deck

The Mets have off tomorrow, and then will face off against the Detroit Tigers on Tuesday in Detroit. R.A. Dickey will toe the rubber against the Tigers Rick Porcello. Game Time is 7:05 P.M.

To read my thoughts on this game and the Mets in general, follow me on twitter @TheSeanKenny

Jun 26

Today in Mets’ History: Looking at Rusty Staub.

Rusty Staub was one of the good guys in Mets’ history, not to mention one of their better players. Who can forget him playing the 1973 World Series with basically one arm?

STAUB: Pinch-hitter delux

Staub developed into one of the game’s great pinch-hitters. On this date in 1983, Staub tied Dave Philley’s then major league record  with his eighth consecutive pinch-hit in the first game of a doubleheader against Philadelphia.

Staub played 23 seasons in the major leagues, including nine with the Mets. He broke in with Houston in 1963 – the Astros’ second year of existence – then played with Montreal (1969-71); the Mets (1972-75); Detroit (1976-79), where he had three of his best seasons; another brief stint with the Expos at the end of the 1979 season; Texas in 1980; and finally five more years with the Mets.

Staub finished with 2,716 hits and 292 homers.

After his career, Staub worked on Mets’ telecasts, then own and operated two restaurants in Manhattan. He is a chef and wine connoisseur.

The Expos retired Staub’s No. 10 in 1993.

STAUB CAREER

Jun 25

I’m glad Davey is back

Of all the managers I’ve covered, Davey Johnson might be the most intriguing. He heard, and marched to one drum, that being his own. He might be the only person to be named manager of the year and fired on the same day.

JOHNSON: He's back.

Many of the memories I carry from covering Major League Baseball for over 20 years happened off the field and not during a game, such as the afternoon in Baltimore when I was sitting next to Johnson during his pre-game press briefing.

Johnson was winding things down, when unprompted, threw out this nugget. Maybe it was to mess with our upcoming off day.

“You know,’’ he began in that slow drawl of his, “I’ve been thinking of moving Cal Ripken to third base.’’

Nugget? For an Orioles’ writer then, it was a bombshell. And, to make it more interesting is he floated the idea without talking to Ripken. He knew we’d all flock to Ripken like ants at a picnic, and this might have been his way of testing the waters.

Another time, Bobby Bonilla – the ultimate team player – didn’t want to play as the DH, this coming several weeks after saying he’d do anything to help the Orioles.

When he name wasn’t in the lineup, Johnson told us Bonilla had a sore ankle and underwent treatment. When asked about his ankle, Bonilla let loose the following obscenity: “Why don’t you ask the (bleeping) manager how it is?’’

Johnson was shaming Bonilla to DH.

Any team Johnson manages is his team, and he takes crap from nobody. Not an iconic figure like

Ripken, not a faux star such as Bonilla, and not a prima donna rookie.

Johnson had his way of dealing with players, and one was to utilize the press, and we were all willing to scoop up what he said.

The Orioles were in Milwaukee one year and going through a miserable stretch, and on this day they blew a game to the Brewers in the late innings. The clubhouse at old County Stadium didn’t have a manager’s office. Instead, there was a desk adjacent to the trainer’s room and players passed by us throughout the interview.

Speaking loud enough where everybody could hear, Johnson took apart his team, basically holding a team meeting in front of the press. No cursing, no yelling, no name calling. But, it was clear he was angry and not in a tolerant mood.

Johnson, of course, as he did with the Mets, got his point across.

Later in that series, Johnson made a decision I didn’t understand.

“Davey,’’ I asked. “I’m not being a wise guy. But, I don’t know as much baseball as you and don’t understand that decision. Could you explain?’’

As Johnson stared at me for a couple of seconds, I felt his glare go through me, but I never released eye contact. He realized I wasn’t kidding, that I didn’t understand, so he laid it all out for me.

So sarcasm, just teaching. Johnson loves to talk about the intricacies of the game. He’s a great teacher, and he’s going to a team in the Washington Nationals that could learn from him.

When it comes to strategy and analyzing a game, few can do it like Johnson and the Nationals are lucky to have him in their dugout. He will make that team smarter and concentrate on the fundamentals.

The Nationals still don’t have the overall talent to compete this year or next, but they will be better.

I’m glad Davey is back in the game and can’t wait until the Nationals are in town.